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Old 07-26-2011, 05:37 PM
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381 posts, read 328,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
I know that many southerners think that they don't have an accent, but when they go up north, they can then easily hear the south in their voices.
I can attest to this. I remember being in a room full of people from the New York City area and thinking, "Damn is this what I really sound like? I do have an accent." Yet when I'm down here people do not seem to hear that I have an accent.
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Old 07-26-2011, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
8,373 posts, read 6,761,008 times
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I will agree that “slight” Southern accents (and the use of certain words and phrases) is fairly indistinguishable until you get outside the region, where even then the use of “y’all” is pretty much universal now and NOT an indicator of Southern roots! (just returned from a trip to Montana, and people there were saying "y'all). However, what prompted this discussion was the over-emphasis of the accent by the Hollywood media which is NOT what we are talking about here. NOBODY in Metro Atlanta sounds like Gomer Pyle, but if we left it up to Californians and New Yorkers they’d have us sounding like that until the end of time. Thankfully, as Atlanta has become a haven for film and TV production, that stereotypical heavy southern drawl which was NEVER indicative of this region has subsided. Capiche?
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Old 07-26-2011, 05:52 PM
 
1,498 posts, read 1,711,753 times
Reputation: 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirkwoodhipster View Post
Very mature-lets just turn this into a hipster-bashing fest. Anyway None of the posters who repsonded is under 30. No offense but you ppl wouldnt know what cool was even if it crawled up ur a*$ and f'ed you.

and i dont care about bumblef*ck metro atlanta and how they talk out in the sticks. In the places that matter and are actually cool - intown atlanta and ITP - and acceptable suburbs like Dunwoody, THICK souther accents are not cool or commonplace. Of course, a light accent is perfectly acceptable and very attractive imo. But a thick one is lame. Get with the times or GTFO!
I am 24, and even though I hate hipsters and everything they stand for, I have to agree with you on this one. I think I may have already went through this, but my circle of friends is composed entirely of natives (albeit all of us were born of at least one transplant parent). Of course we use the standard "ya'll" and people think we have accents up north and out west. In addition, we consider ourselves Southern, as we were all born here. But we don't think we have accents.

Anyway, one of my friends' friends is from Vidalia, Georgia, and she gets a lot of teasing from us for her strong accent. It has gotten to the point where my friends openly call her "Keem", even though her name is Kim. Most of us tend to stereotype those with strong accents as country, and she is no exception.

In addition, based on my experiences cavorting throughout Atlanta and its suburbs, and the intensity level of my social life, southern accents in generation Y Atlantans are pretty rare, unless you are from an exurb. For what it's worth, one of my classmates was from Fayetteville, and she had no discernible accent. I have met someone from South Forsyth with an accent, though.

I don't hate the Southern accent. I also find a light one to be attractive on women. But I will admit that strong accents are generally looked down upon by natives of intown Atlanta and the northern suburbs. Strong accents tend to get the speaker labeled as "country" or "hick" or "small town folk" or "not from Atlanta."
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Old 07-26-2011, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Midtown Atlanta
4,759 posts, read 3,112,463 times
Reputation: 1729
Quote:
Originally Posted by BringBackCobain View Post
I am 24, and even though I hate hipsters and everything they stand for, I have to agree with you on this one. I think I may have already went through this, but my circle of friends is composed entirely of natives (albeit all of us were born of at least one transplant parent). Of course we use the standard "ya'll" and people think we have accents up north and out west. In addition, we consider ourselves Southern, as we were all born here. But we don't think we have accents.

Anyway, one of my friends' friends is from Vidalia, Georgia, and she gets a lot of teasing from us for her strong accent. It has gotten to the point where my friends openly call her "Keem", even though her name is Kim. Most of us tend to stereotype those with strong accents as country, and she is no exception.

In addition, based on my experiences cavorting throughout Atlanta and its suburbs, and the intensity level of my social life, southern accents in generation Y Atlantans are pretty rare, unless you are from an exurb. For what it's worth, one of my classmates was from Fayetteville, and she had no discernible accent. I have met someone from South Forsyth with an accent, though.

I don't hate the Southern accent. I also find a light one to be attractive on women. But I will admit that strong accents are generally looked down upon by natives of intown Atlanta and the northern suburbs. Strong accents tend to get the speaker labeled as "country" or "hick" or "small town folk" or "not from Atlanta."
BBC - I can certainly relate to your observations and think you are correct. As with most stereotypes, however, there are vast exceptions. My mom, who is from rural South Georgia, probably sounds a lot like your friend's mom, Kim. However, I know beyond doubt that mom and many folks with a heavy Southern drawl are quite intelligent. By the way, can you or some other poster tell me what a "hipster" is???
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Old 07-26-2011, 06:39 PM
 
309 posts, read 470,059 times
Reputation: 358
Quote:
Originally Posted by BringBackCobain View Post
I am 24, and even though I hate hipsters and everything they stand for, I have to agree with you on this one. I think I may have already went through this, but my circle of friends is composed entirely of natives (albeit all of us were born of at least one transplant parent). Of course we use the standard "ya'll" and people think we have accents up north and out west. In addition, we consider ourselves Southern, as we were all born here. But we don't think we have accents.

Anyway, one of my friends' friends is from Vidalia, Georgia, and she gets a lot of teasing from us for her strong accent. It has gotten to the point where my friends openly call her "Keem", even though her name is Kim. Most of us tend to stereotype those with strong accents as country, and she is no exception.

In addition, based on my experiences cavorting throughout Atlanta and its suburbs, and the intensity level of my social life, southern accents in generation Y Atlantans are pretty rare, unless you are from an exurb. For what it's worth, one of my classmates was from Fayetteville, and she had no discernible accent. I have met someone from South Forsyth with an accent, though.

I don't hate the Southern accent. I also find a light one to be attractive on women. But I will admit that strong accents are generally looked down upon by natives of intown Atlanta and the northern suburbs. Strong accents tend to get the speaker labeled as "country" or "hick" or "small town folk" or "not from Atlanta."

And honestly I don't know if having that opinion of others is the best thing...................but at least we both hate hipsters

I was born and raised in SW GA and when I went to school up North, I had a thick accent, but yet I'm sharper and more cultured than most people I come across and have done more than most 25 year olds professionally. However, I had to prove myself extra hard in college since people would joke and make fun of me...made my first year in college VERY difficult in terms of my social life...Yeah I laughed with everyone at first, but as time went on, It really got to me....especially when I went to state club meetings for GA and the people from ATL would look at me crazy like I was an alien........

But in my instance I nearly outshined everyone in my class, and after awhile people were asking ME for help in every single class since I regularly aced exams....I worked on my accent because of my own self-consciousness (and certain thoughts of Uppity A**Holes) but I do miss the twang I had before just for nostalgia purposes lol


It amazes me how people are more ok with a thick Foreign accent than an actual thick Southern one though........but that's another topic...............

However, The twang is awesome in certain social situations .....and ESPECIALLY if you're with a really laid back High-powered Conservative Executive at Happy Hour who automatically thinks you're conservative or finds kinship with you even though you're a liberal and a minority.....the stories I could tell...........***GOING TO WATCH SWAMP PEOPLE NOW***
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Old 07-26-2011, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Historic Downtown, Jersey City, NJ
328 posts, read 438,284 times
Reputation: 242
Hipsters =d i e h i p s t e r . c o m

Sorry. Couldn't resist.

Edit: In response to Ansley's question. All in good fun.

Last edited by Lagwagon113; 07-26-2011 at 06:51 PM..
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Old 07-26-2011, 06:52 PM
 
1,498 posts, read 1,711,753 times
Reputation: 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnsleyPark View Post
BBC - I can certainly relate to your observations and think you are correct. As with most stereotypes, however, there are vast exceptions. My mom, who is from rural South Georgia, probably sounds a lot like your friend's mom, Kim. However, I know beyond doubt that mom and many folks with a heavy Southern drawl are quite intelligent. By the way, can you or some other poster tell me what a "hipster" is???
Basically a bunch of d-bags in generation y that think they are cool because they drink PBR and listen to indie rock and live in places like EAV and wear fedoras.

Urban Dictionary: hipster

Quote:
Referring to young people of around 18-30 years of age, who drink cheap beer (most often Pabst Blue Ribbon, on occasion Budwiser), smoke Parliaments, Lucky Strikes or hard to obtain foreign cigarettes (such as Gauloises) and take recreational drugs, coke being the most popular. Use a great deal of sarcasm, claim to be ironic. Are usually less than 5% body fat, drink copious amounts of coffee and eat children's cereal. Listen to Indie Rock, rely heavily on Pitchfork Media to tell them what's cool. Don't dance at concerts. Wear a mixture of thrifted clothing and items bought at American Apparel (commonly Tri-blend v-necks) and Urban Outfitters. Extremely tight jeans worn by both sexes, pairing these with either a band or b-movie t shirt and a plaid shirt/v-neck and a cardigan along with Nike hi-tops/Vans/Keds. Females often wear retro style dresses and racerback tank tops without bras. Eschew public transport and instead choose to ride fixed-break bikes. Often claim to know about literature and film - will have googled a good deal of Vonnegut and French New Wave cinema.
They hate "frat boys" with a passion. I especially like this "example" on urban dictionary:
Quote:
A conversation outside a hipster bar in downtown NYC:

Frat Boy #1: Dude, are you having any luck picking up chicks in there?

Frat Boy #2: Man...I haven't experienced anything like this before. These chicks are totally rejecting me and going for all these hipster guys in tight pants and shaggy hair instead.

Frat Boy #1: Maybe we should head back up to that bar in Murry Hill where you hooked up with that drunk b*tch from Alpha Sigma Phi last week?

Frat Boy #2: Yeah...I don't think we have what it takes to compete with these guys in here. These hipster chicks won't even give us the time of the day!
^^^Totally written by a hipster. I was in a fraternity and we don't talk like that, and we certainly don't have to compete with hipsters for girls.

Hipster (contemporary subculture) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Evolution of the Hipster 2000-2009 :: Culture :: Features :: Paste
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Old 07-26-2011, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Midtown Atlanta
4,759 posts, read 3,112,463 times
Reputation: 1729
Quote:
Originally Posted by BringBackCobain View Post
Basically a bunch of d-bags in generation y that think they are cool because they drink PBR and listen to indie rock and live in places like EAV and wear fedoras.

Urban Dictionary: hipster

They hate "frat boys" with a passion. I especially like this "example" on urban dictionary:
^^^Totally written by a hipster. I was in a fraternity and we don't talk like that, and we certainly don't have to compete with hipsters for girls.

Hipster (contemporary subculture) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Evolution of the Hipster 2000-2009 :: Culture :: Features :: Paste
Sounds like an "interesting" lot, to say the least.
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Old 07-26-2011, 07:43 PM
 
8,718 posts, read 12,373,504 times
Reputation: 1978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
... How have I "been looked down upon"? Please explain?
...
{Answer and explanation just below}
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
...My entire life, I've had people in other parts of the country look down on m[e] because of my Southern heritage ...















Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
...my opinions here are held in higher regard than yours...

I'm sure they are, my good brother--and that is fine by me.


I'd take my sense of class, style, and elegance over uncouthness anyday.

Last edited by aries4118; 07-26-2011 at 08:12 PM..
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Old 07-26-2011, 07:44 PM
 
8,718 posts, read 12,373,504 times
Reputation: 1978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
I wonder if Newsboy thinks that when listening to a light southern accent that he hears no distinguishable southern accent.

I know that many southerners think that they don't have an accent, but when they go up north, they can then easily hear the south in their voices.

This is to Newsboy and Kirkwood hipster.

I think that you are suffering from regional hatred. Seriously, why would you despise the accent of the people of your region? My only opinion on that, I suppose, is that you have learned to hate the accent because the media has treated it with contempt. I also think that you're fairly young, and those in their late teens and early twenties tend to care more about what others, especially those from other regions, think about them. They also tend to adopt the mentality of the media. Since the media has portrayed southerners in a negative light, youth tend to shun that which is not seen as "cool" by the media, and the southern accent is not cool, for southerners are not cool (as determined by the media).

I know this to be the truth, because I attempted to get rid of my southern accent when I was eighteen years old. In fact, I did a pretty good job of ridding myself of it, to the point where people questioned whether I was actually from Georgia. From about eighteen to twenty-one, my southern accent was a no-show. As I aged, however, I realized that I wasn't being myself, and was exhibiting shame for my people and my upbringing. When I realized my error and stopped trying to consciously listen to how I pronounced words, my southern speech returned around age twenty-five, albeit a light southern accent, but it has only continued to thicken as I've gotten into my thirties.

By the way, I think that you'll come home to your roots one day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
My job in the past has taken me all over metro Atlanta. I have sat in restaurants, businesses, and storefronts all over metro Atlanta and have carried on multiple conversation. Furthermore, my brother's ex-girlfriend was from Fayetteville, and I was there on numerous ocassions. Fayetteville is every bit as southern, as is all the other places I mentioned. Peachtree City does have a lack of a southern accent, in many local residents, as only around forty percent of residents are southerners.

Not many years ago, a survey was done, which detailed areas all over metro Atlanta. It detailed those who were native southerners but not born in Georgia, native Georgians, as well as those who were transplants. All southside communities, except Peachtree City, had high southern populations, and many of them had high Georgian populations. Other locations that were like Peachtree City included Roswell, Alpharetta, Norcross, and many intown communities.

Southern accents are very common in Henry and Coweta counties. What I think you're looking for is a thick drawl, as opposed to a light to moderate southern accent, which is clearly present in most residents. Griffin displays a thicker southern accent, much like you'd find in Carroll County, or in more rural locations. Accents nationwide are generally not as strong in urbanized areas as opposed to rural areas.

Good posts.
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