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Old 07-19-2011, 11:52 AM
 
6,235 posts, read 3,585,299 times
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Default Border's is no more

"Borders is filing for bankruptcy and liquidating.

Borders liquidation could provide opportunities *| ajc.com

That also means that almost 11,000 employees will lose their jobs.

So is that good news for Barnes & Noble or will they eventually be next? Bookstores might become a tiny niche in the retail market. Guess "Fahrenheit 451" got it wrong.

It also raises a question for libraries. Will books become as popular as VHS and CDs? Should university libraries expand or contract?

Last edited by MathmanMathman; 07-19-2011 at 12:07 PM..
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Midtown Atlanta
4,096 posts, read 2,409,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MathmanMathman View Post
Borders is filing for bankruptcy and liquidating.

Borders liquidation could provide opportunities *| ajc.com

That also means that almost 11,000 employees will lose their jobs.

So is that good news for Barnes & Noble or will they eventually be next? Bookstores might become a tiny niche in the retail market. Guess Fahrenheit 451 got it wrong.

It also raises a question for libraries. Will books become as popular as VHS and CDs? Should university libraries expand or contract?
Ya know, I've tried the e-reader route (iPad). I just don't find myself "wanting" to read on my iPad. It just doesn't feel right. I'd much rather lug around a paper book, turn down the pages as my bookmark, care not a wit if there is glare on my screen, and, when I'm done, put it on a bookshelf, give it to a friend, save it for my kids to one day read... Borders closing is disheartening. To your question though: I don't think that libraries should contract due to books being printed electronically. I think we will always need our paper books. Right now, a paper book, properly stored, will way outlast anything on digital media. There are still copies of original Chaucer manuscripts in museums! I think e-books, while more than a fad, will lose popularity as the newness wears off.
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by AnsleyPark View Post
Ya know, I've tried the e-reader route (iPad). I just don't find myself "wanting" to read on my iPad. It just doesn't feel right. I'd much rather lug around a paper book, turn down the pages as my bookmark, care not a wit if there is glare on my screen, and, when I'm done, put it on a bookshelf, give it to a friend, save it for my kids to one day read... Borders closing is disheartening. To your question though: I don't think that libraries should contract due to books being printed electronically. I think we will always need our paper books. Right now, a paper book, properly stored, will way outlast anything on digital media. There are still copies of original Chaucer manuscripts in museums! I think e-books, while more than a fad, will lose popularity as the newness wears off.
I don't think so because e-readers will improve and become more versatile. Right now I have too many books at home taking up too much space and if I have to move to a new place...oh man...a book is light but 500 of them.... I would love to have all those books on a flash drive and backed up at Carbonite.

I used to get tired reading stuff off of a computer screen but I think a combination of improved screens and just "getting used to it" have made it my preferred way. Just as newspapers are going on-line, I think books will go electronic. As fewer books are printed, the costs will go up and make them even less desirable.

Libraries should go virtual and contract. The only library I know that is expanding a lot is Georgia Tech's. They are chasing after relevance but their library might turn into more of learning support center than a traditional library. But even then, I think on-line is the smarter way. Video training is tricky to do well but I think it is improving. Lynda offers some excellent training and better training than you'd get in a class.
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
714 posts, read 319,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnsleyPark View Post
Ya know, I've tried the e-reader route (iPad). I just don't find myself "wanting" to read on my iPad. It just doesn't feel right. I'd much rather lug around a paper book, turn down the pages as my bookmark, care not a wit if there is glare on my screen, and, when I'm done, put it on a bookshelf, give it to a friend, save it for my kids to one day read... Borders closing is disheartening. To your question though: I don't think that libraries should contract due to books being printed electronically. I think we will always need our paper books. Right now, a paper book, properly stored, will way outlast anything on digital media. There are still copies of original Chaucer manuscripts in museums! I think e-books, while more than a fad, will lose popularity as the newness wears off.
Different strokes for different folks. I love reading on my IPAD. Last book I read was on it via kindle app.

Here is why. About 9:00 at night a friend told me about a cool book. Instead of waiting until I had some time over the next few days, and then going to the book store, searching it out, etc., I downloaded it via kindle and was reading it less than 5 minutes later! Very Cool.

Many universities are seeing decreased use of their physical libraries. With computers and the internet, who needs to go to the library to do research? As university budgets come under increasing pressure, digital storage will prove FAR cheaper and cost efficient than caring for thousands and thousands of paper documents that take up in one one space where digital can store thousands.

I think digital will only gain in popularity. Once Ive read a book why do I need it to sit on a shelf like some trophy? Takes up space I dont have or want! Smaller houses are a long term trend, IMO. Not to mention the whole environmental aspect vis-a-vis trees.

This is not to say paper books will disappear. They wont. But they will become "quaint", like home phones and film-based photography.

Just my two cents.
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:27 PM
 
2,642 posts, read 5,086,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnsleyPark View Post
Ya know, I've tried the e-reader route (iPad). I just don't find myself "wanting" to read on my iPad. It just doesn't feel right. I'd much rather lug around a paper book, turn down the pages as my bookmark, care not a wit if there is glare on my screen, and, when I'm done, put it on a bookshelf, give it to a friend, save it for my kids to one day read... Borders closing is disheartening. To your question though: I don't think that libraries should contract due to books being printed electronically. I think we will always need our paper books. Right now, a paper book, properly stored, will way outlast anything on digital media. There are still copies of original Chaucer manuscripts in museums! I think e-books, while more than a fad, will lose popularity as the newness wears off.

I can't agree with you re e-books. I bought a Kindle a couple of years ago. My reason for doing so is that I travel a lot for work. When I go to southern Africa the flight from Atlanta to Joburg is 16 hours. That's at least 2 books each way. Then I like to read while I'm there. I don't like to check luggage and packing 4-6 books just takes up valuable space.

My kindle is so thin and holds a lot of books. And because it's e-ink technology there's no glare. It's like reading a real book - no backlight, etc. Also, the e-ink technology benefits from being super-low powered. You only drain the battery when you "turn the page" because it uses magnetic forces (loosely speaking) to create a page. As a result, if you have the wireless card turned off the battery will last 2-3 weeks. That's way longer than any kind of iPad or other backlit (ie, Nook color) e-reader.

And I got the one with the global wireless so I can connect to Amazon.com in any major city all over the world.

I haven't bought a paper book in 2 years. My only caveat is I tell people who don't need the global wireless that they're just as well off with a Sony e-reader. Those can accommodate more formats and communicate with public libraries easier than a Kindle.

And I've found the only books I CAN'T get as an e-book are out-of-print fiction. Not classics. You can get classics, usually for free, as e-books.

I don't think e-books are a fad at all.

But, before I bought my Kindle I felt the same as you.

Too bad about Borders. But I could see it coming. They didn't seem interested in keeping up with the way books/reading is going.
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:33 PM
 
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I've found myself using the library more than ever these days. Part of it is simply a little belt-tightening.

But I also really like the experience of being there and literally walking the aisles of knowledge. Invariably I come across something I didn't expect and find myself branching off in a different direction.

And as Ansley says, I enjoy the tangible aspects of books. It feels good to hold when in your hand. You don't have to worry about whether its battery is charged up. You can read a book just about anywhere. I've got an iPad (and love it) but don't want to take it poolside or down to the beach. You can easily pass a book on to a friend, or store it for later on.

I've also noticed that the library always seems full of people these days. I enjoy being among them. A lot of them probably don't have the luxury of an electronic reader. You can check out movies and music there as well. And find maps, photographs and research materials that aren't available online.

Moreover, libraries are good community gathering places and are used for all sorts of meetings.

Ansley, I know just what you mean about rare books. We were in New Haven last year and I spent all afternoon wandering around the Beinecke in absolute awe.
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:45 PM
JPD
 
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Originally Posted by plessthanpointohfive View Post
Too bad about Borders. But I could see it coming. They didn't seem interested in keeping up with the way books/reading is going.
I could see it coming, too. It was obvious. Borders hasn't been interested in offering a quality shopping experience at a good price for at least 10 years. You could sense the desperation in the air for the last few years. Add to that the emails from them every single day, sometimes more than one email per day, and you'd have to be clueless not to have seen this coming.

I feel bad for their employees, but I won't miss Borders.
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:47 PM
 
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But even the electronic medium has its aspects of serendipity. I've taken off and explored new ideas and learned more on-line than I have ever done in a library. Sure there will be some trade-offs, but ebooks are the future for convenience and economy.

Libraries have been store houses of literature and information. But with the revolution in information technology, and better and better search engines, libraries will have to find another use probably as community centers. University libraries might fare better as students seek places to go to study or get with their groups but staffing needs there might be minimal.
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Midtown Atlanta
4,096 posts, read 2,409,442 times
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Originally Posted by MathmanMathman View Post
Just as newspapers are going on-line...
Please don't tell my dogs that there is a chance that they won't be able to accompany me to the sidewalk each morning to pick up the morning paper! I just can't imagine them getting as excited about my booting up my iPad...
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:55 PM
 
13,747 posts, read 8,133,220 times
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Originally Posted by MathmanMathman View Post
But even the electronic medium has its aspects of serendipity. I've taken off and explored new ideas and learned more on-line than I have ever done in a library. Sure there will be some trade-offs, but ebooks are the future for convenience and economy.
Oh, yeah, I love the Internets and the ability to leap from subject to subject. And there's no doubt the future of ebooks is bright.

However, I still like libraries and bookstores. To me ebooks are more or an adjunct rather than a replacement.

But it may be a generational thing. People in my age bracket will be gone in another couple of decades and the next crop my decide books should go on in the dustbin too.

With regard to Borders' demise, I wonder if it's ebooks that are doing the damage, or the availability of online shopping for print books?

No doubt they've suffered from some business decisions as well. I read that they'd racked up a lot of debt and were having trouble servicing it and keeping books in stock.
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