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Old 09-12-2011, 05:01 PM
 
14,593 posts, read 9,187,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomno00 View Post
That is part of the problem in Atlanta. The conservative population is not willing to open up it's wallet or pocket book (But it's ok because we are good church going folk.). More so in atlanta than other large cities, I find that we have a "it's all about me" attitude. People would rather save a few dollars than to see their city improve.
Well, how would you propose to deal with that problem?

It certainly doesn't help just to complain about it.

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Old 09-12-2011, 05:07 PM
 
357 posts, read 370,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Well, how would you propose to deal with that problem?

It certainly doesn't help just to complain about it.

Honestly, it's just the way ATL is. I think a city needs a healthy mix of both liberals and conservatives, but I dont think we have that here. I don't know how to deal with it. That's asking a lot... to understand and try to influenence the philosphical and economical motives of a human being
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Old 09-12-2011, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,793 posts, read 2,301,575 times
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Actually, it can be argued that the 1965 Voting Rights Act indirectly share some of the blame for Atlanta's relative misfortunes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomno00 View Post
Honestly, it's just the way ATL is. I think a city needs a healthy mix of both liberals and conservatives, but I dont think we have that here. I don't know how to deal with it. That's asking a lot... to understand and try to influenence the philosphical and economical motives of a human being
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Old 09-12-2011, 06:50 PM
 
14,593 posts, read 9,187,137 times
Reputation: 3448
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomno00 View Post
Honestly, it's just the way ATL is. I think a city needs a healthy mix of both liberals and conservatives, but I dont think we have that here. I don't know how to deal with it. That's asking a lot... to understand and try to influenence the philosphical and economical motives of a human being
I hate to say the obvious, but can't never could.

That is not Atlanta's history. What has marked us through the years is the ability to hang in there and forge compromise where many cities would have given up. You can start with us being burnt to the ground, but that was hardly a blip on our radar screen.

Who would have thought we could become the transportation and financial center of the Southern US only 20 years later? Who believed we could have hosted successful world fairs in the late 1800s? That we could overcome the Klan and the horrible assault on Leo Frank? That we could desegregate our schools without the violence of other cities? Bring in big league sports in the 1960s? Build a gigantic freeway system AND a subway system at the same time? That we could become the center of the civil rights movement, produce a President, host the Olympics, acquire 5 million new residents and become the springboard for 24 hour cable news? The nation's busiest airport, its largest maternity hospital, and the greatest cultural center south of Washington DC?

What we do in Atlanta is pretty simple -- we don't give up and we don't accept the status quo. And bear in mind we have done ALL of the above things with a population that is just as complex and multifaceted as it is today.

I simply don't accept the idea that "that's just the way it is in Atlanta." Like generations of Atlantans before us, we can make this go if we want to. It just takes hard work.
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Old 09-13-2011, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,793 posts, read 2,301,575 times
Reputation: 1449
YES!!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I hate to say the obvious, but can't never could.

That is not Atlanta's history. What has marked us through the years is the ability to hang in there and forge compromise where many cities would have given up. You can start with us being burnt to the ground, but that was hardly a blip on our radar screen.

Who would have thought we could become the transportation and financial center of the Southern US only 20 years later? Who believed we could have hosted successful world fairs in the late 1800s? That we could overcome the Klan and the horrible assault on Leo Frank? That we could desegregate our schools without the violence of other cities? Bring in big league sports in the 1960s? Build a gigantic freeway system AND a subway system at the same time? That we could become the center of the civil rights movement, produce a President, host the Olympics, acquire 5 million new residents and become the springboard for 24 hour cable news? The nation's busiest airport, its largest maternity hospital, and the greatest cultural center south of Washington DC?

What we do in Atlanta is pretty simple -- we don't give up and we don't accept the status quo. And bear in mind we have done ALL of the above things with a population that is just as complex and multifaceted as it is today.

I simply don't accept the idea that "that's just the way it is in Atlanta." Like generations of Atlantans before us, we can make this go if we want to. It just takes hard work.
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Old 09-13-2011, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Midtown Atlanta
4,560 posts, read 2,845,886 times
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Well said.
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Old 09-13-2011, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Back in Boring Seattle
90 posts, read 95,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantagreg30127 View Post
You can thank Sonny Perdue for that. Roy Barnes put it together with the ultimate goal that GRTA would eventually have authority over all metro Atlanta transit agencies and be able to make certain key decisions about expansion without a lot of the red tape involved today. After the "boot Barnes 'cause we're mad about the flag", campaign, Perdue took over and drastically slashed the GRTA budget and power/authority. I would be shocked if Deal repairs it - it sounds like he wants something under his own name to claim fame to, but time will tell.
I remember that. When Cobb had once again rejected a Marta expansion into their county, the Barnes administration got fed up and at the time had only talked about an authority at the state level. I moved away and now 10 years later I'm surprised to find out it still hasn't been done. That's disappointing, here I thought there'd be a whole slew of new Marta stations by now
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Old 09-13-2011, 10:05 AM
 
14,593 posts, read 9,187,137 times
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Here's another aspect of the transportation problem. We're entering an era when an increasing portion the population is seniors. How will their mobility be affected without transit?

Quote:
Study: 90 percent of metro Atlanta seniors to lack transit access by 2015

Yep, metro Atlanta has found itself at the top of yet another "worst" list.

According to a new study by Transportation For America, 90 percent of metro Atlanta's seniors that's more than 500,000 people have "poor access" to transit and "will face shrinking mobility options as they age" by 2015. That means they'll have a harder time visiting the doctor, shopping at the supermarket, and seeing their families. The golden years of their lives will be spent sitting inside, watching Maury, and posting cute yet embarrassing things on their grandchildren's Facebook walls. The number is most likely to increase in metro Atlanta, where one in five residents is expected to be over the age of 65 by the year 2030.
I don't know how many of you attended the Andres Duany charrettes a few years ago on finding ways to allow senior citizens to continue to live in place with dignity. It was eye-opening and it will define our city in important ways.
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Old 09-13-2011, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,793 posts, read 2,301,575 times
Reputation: 1449
Another great cause for concern.

We will all grow old at some point, and that is the inevitable truth. Our eyesight will weaken, our reflexes will slow down, and our bodies will atrophy to the point where driving a car will no longer be an option. Some of us may choose to lean on our children, but by doing so we may unfortunately limit their ability to be a marketable force on the employment circuit.

Would be nice if America had a confirmed & consistent "safety-net" culture so that services like MARTA's paratransit bus system can operate without the constant fear of being shutdown...but that ain't happenin' anytime soon.

So what are we Georgians and Americans willing to do to address this situation of all these graying babyboomers retiring in such dire straits? Are we Americans really going to maintain this insane hyper-individualistic machismo culture where socialistic benefits like a paratransit system are to be frowned upon?

Or will we Americans at some point in the future finally acknowledge that "no man is an island unto himself", and that we all need a little helping from the community?

I guess only time will tell what the answer will ultimately be...

Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Here's another aspect of the transportation problem. We're entering an era when an increasing portion the population is seniors. How will their mobility be affected without transit?

I don't know how many of you attended the Andres Duany charrettes a few years ago on finding ways to allow senior citizens to continue to live in place with dignity. It was eye-opening and it will define our city in important ways.
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Old 09-13-2011, 05:21 PM
 
21 posts, read 18,143 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomno00 View Post
That is part of the problem in Atlanta. The conservative population is not willing to open up it's wallet or pocket book (But it's ok because we are good church going folk.). More so in atlanta than other large cities, I find that we have a "it's all about me" attitude. People would rather save a few dollars than to see their city improve.

Actually I think they have watched all the money taken out of their pocketbooks in the form of taxes and aren't happy with the results of how that money has been spent. The layered effect of county and city governments in the metro area is a huge waste. Most people I know understand the reality that certain parts of the population of a county or city are going to subsidize other parts in certain ways. I have owned multiple properties in the City of Atlanta since 1988. I am married, but have no kids. Yet, I pay school taxes every year. I understand that a good public school system is part of what makes a city an attractive place to live in/move to, blah blahblah, but if you think that I believe my school taxes have been spent well you are crazy.

I think what you see is a metro area that has reached a bit of a tipping point. I still live in the City of Atlanta and my business is located entirely in the City limits. I pray that the recent trend of new north Fulton cities being created will be stopped, but my guess that the City of Milton will be here soon. What we are experiencing here is a microcosm of the nationwide debate that is underway. For those that pay the majority of the taxes, entitlement progeams, subsidies, etc. have grown too large and made a large segment of the population too dependent on the "safety net" that Acid Snake is so concerned about. When you spend too much time in that safety net it actually turns in to a hammock, which isn't good for anyone.

To say that the conservatives haven't "opened their pocketbooks" is, to say the least, myopic. Whether they are willing to keep them open much longer for a system they see is broken is a much more accurate and realistic way to look at it.
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