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View Poll Results: Most common trees in the neighborhood
Deciduous (Oak, Hickory, Poplar, Dogwood, Sassafrass, Birch) 18 54.55%
Pine (Loblolly) 3 9.09%
Trees? My neighborhood has twigs after it was clear-cut 0 0%
Half & Half 12 36.36%
Voters: 33. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 12-10-2011, 07:58 AM
 
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Given that metro Atlanta has some areas where pines seem to be the majority of trees, and other areas where you'd be surprised to see more than a few pines, I think it is in order to ask Atlanta forumers what their neighborhoods mostly consist of, in terms of trees.

If you could mention deciduous or pine, followed by the type of deciduous, if you happen to know.
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Old 12-10-2011, 08:46 AM
 
Location: GA
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Mostly pine in the back and oak on the sides and front. Darn leaves!!!!
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Old 12-10-2011, 11:20 AM
 
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All the houses in our neighborhood back up to woods, and the woods have loads of pines. The builders did a good job of leaving some of the larger deciduous specimens, oaks, hickory,pears and magnolias.
Most people have landscaped with maples, crepe myrtles, cherry trees, bald cypress, holly and birches.

A little bit of everything around here.
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Old 12-10-2011, 11:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattie View Post
All the houses in our neighborhood back up to woods, and the woods have loads of pines. The builders did a good job of leaving some of the larger deciduous specimens, oaks, hickory,pears and magnolias.
Most people have landscaped with maples, crepe myrtles, cherry trees, bald cypress, holly and birches.

A little bit of everything around here.
In what part of town is this?

I've never known native magnolias to be in high abundance is most areas around here. In fact, it's generally close to zero in most locations.

My neighborhood is mostly deciduous. Pines are an invasive species given the fact that they are gymnosperms. Carried by the wind, pines can come to inhabit any open lot, as long there are only a few pine trees in the area surrounding the lot.

Prior to the rapid development of metro Atlanta, there weren't very many pines in this part of Georgia. One can look at photos from the 1800s and see that it was mostly deciduous, on the order of 95% + compared to today where it's only around 60% deciduous.
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Old 12-10-2011, 11:32 AM
 
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Pines - mostly backyard but some in front. I have a HUGE one on the side of my yard. I have gone from full sun to mostly shade in the 17 years I have lived in my house.

Dogwoods and Bradford Pears - lots in the front yards

Eastern Redbud - I have seen one in the back. Would love to plant one but not sure I have enough room

Magnolias - both front and back

Redtips - I had three big ones in the back that were planted too close and eventually got too unhealthy.

River Birch - several in front yards

Plum Trees - side and back yards but most have become unhealthy overtime due to not being properly trimed or planted too close to other trees.

Crepe Myrtles - mostly front

Maples (Amercian I think - not Japanese) - front yards

Weeping Willows - there were two beautiful ones in front yards when I first moved in but they are now gone.

I have seen lots of trees removed because they were improperly trimmed over the years or planted too close to another tree or house with no consideration to size when full grown. Many have been lost to drought (weak root systems that could not support the tree).
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Old 12-10-2011, 01:54 PM
 
7,781 posts, read 9,343,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
In what part of town is this?

I've never known native magnolias to be in high abundance is most areas around here. In fact, it's generally close to zero in most locations.

My neighborhood is mostly deciduous. Pines are an invasive species given the fact that they are gymnosperms. Carried by the wind, pines can come to inhabit any open lot, as long there are only a few pine trees in the area surrounding the lot.

Prior to the rapid development of metro Atlanta, there weren't very many pines in this part of Georgia. One can look at photos from the 1800s and see that it was mostly deciduous, on the order of 95% + compared to today where it's only around 60% deciduous.
We are in Milton. You can see magnolias along the road in some spots where there is undeveloped land.

Yeah, about those pines. I am constantly pulling up sprouts out of all our garden beds.

We took down all the pines within striking distance of our house.
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Old 12-10-2011, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Virginia Highland, GA
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I have mostly deciduous here in Va Highland, very few pines at all...............
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Old 12-10-2011, 02:50 PM
 
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I'm in Candler Park, so like brent the neighborhood is mostly deciduous. Though my neighbor behind me has a scrub pine. Several homes have "christmas tree" trees. My own home only has TWO trees, if you can believe that. An 85 year old oak in the front and a young hickory in the back. But, I have very little property so it's actually the right amount of tree. My neighbors, however, have humongous oaks. Scary fall on your house and kill you oaks.
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Old 12-10-2011, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Jupiter, FL
1,184 posts, read 1,141,687 times
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I hate pine trees. They are the source of our annual yellow pollen blizzard, they provide little shade in the summer, and they are only pretty when very young.
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Old 12-10-2011, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
338 posts, read 396,355 times
Reputation: 206
About 60% deciduous, 40% pine in my subdivision straddling the DeKalb-Gwinnett County line.
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