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Old 02-18-2012, 07:12 PM
 
97 posts, read 182,871 times
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For many people, however, a home is also invested with lots of emotions, not all of which are entirely rational. If one is going to be anxious or bothered by the threat of severe weather every time there's a thunderstorm, I can see opting for a structure that would offer greater protection even if, statistically, the threat of harm from a tornado is quite small.
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Old 06-15-2017, 10:10 AM
 
187 posts, read 146,952 times
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I'm about to move to the 27th floor of a residential highrise in my city and my mother-in law is freaking out. Now she's getting my wife on here side after the London fire. I have been researching trying to find solid evidence that highrise living is generally safer than SFH. Basically, there have been almost zero deaths by fire in highrises in the US in the past 5 or 10 years, while there have been thousands in SFHs. Where can I find solid evidence? Any good articles about highrise safety?
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Old 06-15-2017, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
1,956 posts, read 1,995,179 times
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I would not call high rises any safer than single family homes from a practical standpoint.

The real issue is what kind of danger/calamity/accident that your mother in law is worried about.

If its a fire then a high rise is more dangerous in that egress takes a much longer time than in a house (especially since elevators will stop working), but most high rises have sprinkler systems, fire alarms that go throughout the entire buildingand fire extinguishers at regular intervals.


If its a tornado then a high rise won't sustain the kind of structural damage that a SFH would (tree through a wall, roof torn completely off), but a tornado will easily tear the glass off of the side of a high rise, which leaves large, sharp edged openings that can present just as much danger to someone in the wrong place at the wrong time.


If its theft then a high rise (with self-locking doors, security kiosks, and cameras) offers more security, but a single family home the right neighborhood would be safe with open windows, zero window shades, and unlocked doors for decades on end.

Ceteris paribus, the high density of people in a smaller space in a high probably poses more inherent risk .... but there are a slew of other factors that have way more influence on the actual dangers.

Median income in the area, disparity of income in the area, crime rate, daytime vs nighttime population, geographic location, local culture & customes, amount and type of economic activity in the area, historical trends, etc.
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Old 08-03-2017, 09:28 AM
 
187 posts, read 146,952 times
Reputation: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarzanman View Post
I would not call high rises any safer than single family homes from a practical standpoint.

The real issue is what kind of danger/calamity/accident that your mother in law is worried about.

If its a fire then a high rise is more dangerous in that egress takes a much longer time than in a house (especially since elevators will stop working), but most high rises have sprinkler systems, fire alarms that go throughout the entire buildingand fire extinguishers at regular intervals.


If its a tornado then a high rise won't sustain the kind of structural damage that a SFH would (tree through a wall, roof torn completely off), but a tornado will easily tear the glass off of the side of a high rise, which leaves large, sharp edged openings that can present just as much danger to someone in the wrong place at the wrong time.


If its theft then a high rise (with self-locking doors, security kiosks, and cameras) offers more security, but a single family home the right neighborhood would be safe with open windows, zero window shades, and unlocked doors for decades on end.

Ceteris paribus, the high density of people in a smaller space in a high probably poses more inherent risk .... but there are a slew of other factors that have way more influence on the actual dangers.

Median income in the area, disparity of income in the area, crime rate, daytime vs nighttime population, geographic location, local culture & customes, amount and type of economic activity in the area, historical trends, etc.
So you're saying the highrise is more dangerous in a fire just because the elevators quit working? I've never heard of anyone dying from a highrise fire other than in London. These are made of steel and concrete and take extreme measures to ensure the whole thing isn't engulfed in flames. Look at the WTC... It took an airplane explosion to really do damage and the whole building was not engulfed. Obviously, I want to believe the highrise is safer ha! I'm just looking for solid evidence to present to a scared wife and mother inlaw.

Crime is obvious.. Few people would choose a random apt in a highrise at random to rob thinking they can get away with it with no cameras or running into other people. In our current complex, it's only the people on the first or second floors who have break in problems.

At the end of the day, every day in each state, someone dies from a house fire. The things are tinderboxes. Hundreds of homes are leveled from winds/tornados each year, but I have not heard of one single highrise to fail.

If I'm wrong please let me know. Thanks for all the input!
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