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Unread 03-29-2012, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
736 posts, read 496,554 times
Reputation: 297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oppressed1982 View Post
I have lived here in Oakhurst for 35 years in the same house. I have noticed that I am no longer welcome in my own neighborhood, I get dirty looks and people follow me when I go to the local shops. During an event in Oakhurst I walked down to see what was going on and was told by a group of people working the even that it was for "residents only".
This is effing shameful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oppressed1982 View Post
When buying these houses you must keep in mind that poor blacks lived there, and were offered less than half what their property was worth, and because of the flipping the taxes increased making it impossible for them to live there. Do you ever think about where they go? Do they not deserve a family home to pass down to their children?
This is history repeating itself. The same thing happened back in the 1950s, only it was white people selling their homes for pennies on the dollar due to aggressive blockbusting. Poor blacks bought the homes and moved in, even though they did not live there historically. Did you wonder where all those families went, who lost their homes and in many cases, their life savings? Did they not deserve a family home to pass down to their children?

...And if you go further back, it was Native Americans who were displaced. We know where they went (Oklahoma), and it wasn't a fun trip. And they equally deserved a family home to pass down to their children. So clearly it's not about what people deserve, it's just something that happens. As arjay57 mentioned, neighborhoods naturally shift and change over time, and the dynamics can be complex. Unfortunately it's not always pretty or easy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oppressed1982 View Post
Go back to the burbs where you belong.
I am truly sorry that you're being treated the way you are, in the neighborhood where you've lived your entire life. The behavior that you described is completely inexcusable. But with a statement like this, you sound just like those new yuppies who have moved in and taken over. Who is to say where another person "belongs"?
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Unread 03-30-2012, 11:12 PM
 
Location: atlanta
2,171 posts, read 1,239,562 times
Reputation: 1150
there needs to be a law on the books in fulton county or just the city of atlanta that says if you've lived in a location longer than ten years, your property taxes in the future cannot be any higher than anything you paid in the previous ten years, adjusted for inflation. this seems fair enough and would prevent gentrifiers from shoving out older residents.
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Unread 03-31-2012, 09:00 AM
 
220 posts, read 334,278 times
Reputation: 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oppressed1982 View Post
I have lived here in Oakhurst for 35 years in the same house. The gentrification of my neighborhood is the most depressing thing I have seen. I have noticed that I am no longer welcome in my own neighborhood, I get dirty looks and people follow me when I go to the local shops. During an event in Oakhurst I walked down to see what was going on and was told by a group of people working the even that it was for "residents only". The new neighbors on my street dont so much as smile when I walk my dog. As a child I lived next to a crack house here..and I would much rather they come back than have to deal with the snooty and rich that are taking over. I went to college and came home 3 years later and did not see anyone I knew, thats one of the perks of a small town, but everyone was gone. The city schools and new residents like yourselves have made it very clear that "we" african americans are no longer welcome. I went to the Decatur schools...I worked for the city...I baby sat for many white families in the area and I am college educated yet the racism trumps it all. I recieve letters on a daily basis from people trying to push me out of my home...I shall not be moved. When buying these houses you must keep in mind that poor blacks lived there, and were offered less than half what their property was worth, and because of the flipping the taxes increased making it impossible for them to live there. Do you ever think about where they go? Do they not deserve a family home to pass down to their children? Go back to the burbs where you belong.
I felt for you till you wrote this...

I also find it a bit hard to believe that all your neighbors are as rude as you paint them to be...this is the most bleeding heart liberal city in metro Atlanta...all I hear is how wonderful Decatur is for its "diversity".

Know what? I get those letters too (I usually get about 2 a year)! Just throw them away and don't assume its about race, unless they say "because you are black we would like you to move" which I doubt yours do. Its usually a developer who wants to make a buck and could care less if you are black, white, elephant or donkey.

Last edited by carrot; 03-31-2012 at 09:09 AM..
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Unread 05-22-2012, 01:58 PM
 
12,605 posts, read 7,205,652 times
Reputation: 2871
Sounds like a number of folks are unhappy with what's going on in Oakhurst.

Quote:
Oakhurst has become a bastion of white privilege where new residents are imposing their values on the community in ways that are deconstructing it building by building and person by person. McMansions punctuate streetscapes once defined by modest vernacular homes and young, mostly white families with strollers and children in tow jockey for sidewalk space while walking to the revitalized business district’s hip outdoor eateries and drinking establishments. The community’s email list carries the usual queries about local contractors, lost pet announcements, and yard sales. These are interrupted, however, by occasional class-laden debates like the one in early 2012 about whether a Family Dollar store is appropriate for a long-vacant commercial property that once housed the neighborhood’s only grocery store.

Now before Oakhurst residents gin up a virtual lynching party because they think I’m calling them racist, that’s not what I’m saying. I’m suggesting that they exhibit what legal scholar Barbara Flagg describes as the “transparency phenomenon.” White people, according to Flagg, are born with the privilege of not having to think of themselves in racial terms on a daily basis. “Whites appear to pursue that option so habitually that it may be a defining characteristic of whiteness: to be white is not to think about it.” Transparency, then, writes Flagg, operates to require black assimilation even when pluralism is the articulated goal; it affords substantial advantages to whites over blacks even when decisionmakers intend to effect substantive racial justice.

White privilege is a package of unearned assets that remains unrecognized by its holders. That privilege allows whites a certain hegemony that includes residential mobility, educational choices, and access to power. It is systemic and it gives holders the power to reshape cultural landscapes like Oakhurst. Legal scholars, like Wildman, Flagg, and others have deftly shown that the privilege attributed to whites may be found in other social groups, e.g., heterosexuals, males, etc., and can manifest itself in the ways people in these groups interact with women, gays, and others.

Longtime residents, like former Decatur mayor Elizabeth Wilson and former community leaders like William Denton, lament the resegregation, diminished diversity, and wholesale destruction of the cultural landscape that gave Oakhurst its sense of place. Wilson continues to live in Oakhurst; Denton, however, moved away as soon as he retired in 2000. ”From our point of view, we were glad that we were leaving South Decatur at that time because it definitely wasn’t the kind of diverse community that we had enjoyed,” Denton said in a Skype interview.

Privilege, gentrification, and displacement in Decatur, Georgia | History Sidebar
[footnotes omitted from quote - see citations in link]
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Unread 05-23-2012, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
736 posts, read 496,554 times
Reputation: 297
Interesting read, Arjay - thanks for the link. There's another good, related article here:

Waiting for the other shoe to drop, the next house to fall | History Sidebar

Quote:
Oakhurst in many ways is a mythical place. There’s the place romanticized by new upper-middle-class residents moving in and buying large new homes on teardown sites. And then there’s the place described by the people who have witnessed economic strife and rebirth who feel increasingly alienated and marginalized. It’s the latter folks who are dying out and who are being displaced as their homes are torn down and their neighborhood is reworked into a hip, trendy residential community with outdoor cafes, jazz nights, wine crawls, and festivals. City and neighborhood leaders turn a blind eye to the problems so evident that they are plainly visible to anyone who looks and who speaks to those most affected.
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Unread 05-23-2012, 04:41 PM
 
12,605 posts, read 7,205,652 times
Reputation: 2871
Quote:
Originally Posted by researchnerd View Post
Interesting read, Arjay - thanks for the link. There's another good, related article here:

Waiting for the other shoe to drop, the next house to fall | History Sidebar
Quote:
Oakhurst in many ways is a mythical place. There’s the place romanticized by new upper-middle-class residents moving in and buying large new homes on teardown sites. And then there’s the place described by the people who have witnessed economic strife and rebirth who feel increasingly alienated and marginalized. It’s the latter folks who are dying out and who are being displaced as their homes are torn down and their neighborhood is reworked into a hip, trendy residential community with outdoor cafes, jazz nights, wine crawls, and festivals. City and neighborhood leaders turn a blind eye to the problems so evident that they are plainly visible to anyone who looks and who speaks to those most affected.
I can't imagine what it feels like to see your neighborhood turned into a hip, trendy residential community with outdoor cafes, jazz nights, wine crawls, and festivals while city leaders sit there and watch it happen.

Perhaps some of it is simply the shifting sands of time. My own memories of Oakhurst go back to the days when it was a sleepy little enclave of middle class white folks. Some of them had lived there for decades and you got the impression they thought it was "their" neighborhood. But nothing lasts forever and eventually they moved on.
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Unread 06-08-2012, 02:24 PM
 
12,605 posts, read 7,205,652 times
Reputation: 2871
You get the impression not everybody in Oakhurst is happy about the young urban types moving in and changing things around.

Oakhurst voices: Elizabeth Wilson | History Sidebar


Decatur's new "Sustainability Plan" - YouTube
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Unread 06-08-2012, 03:08 PM
 
748 posts, read 384,729 times
Reputation: 332
Expect to see a 5/4 with 2-car garage and dual master suites, in the $600k range, towing above homes on either side in a couple months.

Weird that the returning GI's had no problem raising kids in that house back when it was built, but now it needs to be three times bigger.
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Unread 06-08-2012, 03:31 PM
 
12,605 posts, read 7,205,652 times
Reputation: 2871
You have to wonder what makes young people want bigger houses nowadays. I grew up in a little cottage like that and nobody seemed to have a problem. If you didn't like it, your parents told you to get out and get your own place.
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Unread 06-08-2012, 04:40 PM
Status: "Mayor of MARTA" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Kirkwood
6,220 posts, read 2,887,136 times
Reputation: 1305
Society and the media influence people to buy bigger homes. I was raised in a 900sq ft house. My sister and I shared a room. I bought a decent 1300 sq ft house.
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