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Old 04-03-2012, 09:24 AM
 
906 posts, read 1,440,708 times
Reputation: 468

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Chris Leinberger tells Rotarians how Atlanta can become hot again | SaportaReport

Quote:
So why is Atlanta losing ground?
The major reason, as Leinberger sees it, is that the region quit investing in transportation — particularly public transit. Unlike Washington, D.C. and San Francisco (two cities that started building a rail system at the same time as Atlanta), Atlanta has barely expanded its MARTA system and it has not leveraged the economic development potential of developing around its transit stations. . . .

So what should Atlanta do to catch up lost ground.
Leinberger provided five suggestions.

1. Pass the July 31 referendum. “It’s the most important investment you will make in the 21st Century. If not, the next town that you will be lapped by is Birmingham,” he said.
2. Fast track the Atlanta BeltLine, which is one of the most important rail projects in the country.
3. Develop at least 25 to 30 more walkable urban places — including such places in the suburbs, and seek to serve at least 85 percent of them with rail transit.
4. Take better advantage of your knowledge-based generators — such as Atlanta’s research universities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
5. Look at the region as a whole. “This nonsense of outside the perimeter and inside the perimeter has to go,” Leinberger said. “I liken it to a baseball field with an infield and an outfield. You need both,” he said.
Note that this isn't ignoring the suburbs here. He's arguing that Atlanta is falling behind because we aren't linking up and strengthening urban and suburban cores.

If someone is opposed to transit development, what alternatives could be proposed to keep Atlanta economically competitive with other metros? I haven't seen any realistic alternative suggestions, frankly. Doesn't that mean that the default is simply "Do nothing"? That's not a reasonable or wise position to take here.
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,147 posts, read 16,147,338 times
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Why can't GDOT just build commuter rail. That would solve a lot of issue, but the suburb-to-suburb commute. North Fulton cities were never built on rail lines, HRT would have to traverse up 400. Setup stations at Doraville, Lenox, East Point, Avodale, and H.E. Holmes stations. That way commuters could transfer to HRT if they wanted. Commuter rail is the cheapest and easiest way to get commuter transit to the suburbs.
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:33 AM
 
7,687 posts, read 9,530,024 times
Reputation: 5657
Quote:
1. Pass the July 31 referendum. “It’s the most important investment you will make in the 21st Century. If not, the next town that you will be lapped by is Birmingham,” he said.
Legislators only want this tax passed because it saves them from having to make tough decisions to figure out how to handle projects. Taxpayers to the rescue! Don't you think if Congress proposed a national sales tax that would force Americans to pay off the nation debt that it would cut through partisan red tape and everybody would support it? Of course they want us to do their jobs for them! We're so far away from being lapped by Birmingham, it's ludicrous. They don't even want to lap us. If we get lapped by Birmingham, it's because people have decided they want smaller towns that are easier to navigate, certainly not because they want more public transportation!

Quote:
2. Fast track the Atlanta BeltLine, which is one of the most important rail projects in the country.
No it isn't. It's a rail line that will be cool, but will do practically nothing to make actually getting around the city any easier. I don't think even the biggest optimist thinks anybody is going to commute on the BeltLine. It's a neat project, but I'd throw it on the back burner and funnel all of its resources into rail that people will actually use.

Quote:
3. Develop at least 25 to 30 more walkable urban places — including such places in the suburbs, and seek to serve at least 85 percent of them with rail transit.
It's a nice idea. As soon as I finish getting my magic wand serviced, I'll wave it and make this happen.

Quote:
4. Take better advantage of your knowledge-based generators — such as Atlanta’s research universities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Sounds reasonable to me. I'm not an expert on these places, but if they are being underutilized, by all means maximize what they do.

Quote:
5. Look at the region as a whole. “This nonsense of outside the perimeter and inside the perimeter has to go,” Leinberger said. “I liken it to a baseball field with an infield and an outfield. You need both,” he said.
Hard to argue with this point, very well stated. And applies to this board, too!
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:36 AM
 
596 posts, read 1,379,356 times
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LOL @ rail line from Arts Center to Acworth...huge LOL!!!

Sorry, but I can't envision any situation in which public transportation will be a viable option for Atlanta. The MARTA as it is now is really even more than you need and hardly anybody is riding it anyway.

But, haven't people Cobb struck down the MARTA extension idea like 20 times already? The people there obviously don't want it, keep voting against it, and don't want to pay for it. If this were to be implemented you'd have the same problems with traffic, they'd just be centered around the train station on a 2 lane county road as opposed to be an 8 lane interstate.

It will just never work. The suburbs are just way too far away and the fares to pay for it all would have to be way too high to make it viable.
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,147 posts, read 16,147,338 times
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Quote:
I don't think even the biggest optimist thinks anybody is going to commute on the BeltLine.
People living in O4W or VaHI that need to commute to Buckhead could catch the BeltLine to Lindbergh then transfer to HRT or buses. Same of those living in SWAT or SE ATL.
Quote:
The MARTA as it is now is really even more than you need and hardly anybody is riding it anyway.
Have you ever commuted on MARTA. Its standing room only during rush hour on all lines! Please experience commuting on MARTA before making comments on here. 500,000 people commute using MARTA, that's 10% of the regions population.
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Old 04-03-2012, 10:01 AM
JPD
 
11,849 posts, read 14,462,248 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post

No it isn't. It's a rail line that will be cool, but will do practically nothing to make actually getting around the city any easier. Of course it will. I live in Cabbagetown, and I would use the beltline any time I wanted to go to Piedmont Park or most anywhere in Midtown or the Westside, not to mention any number of other places along its route. Now, if you said it won't make getting around the metro area any easier, you'd be right, but in no way does that diminish what the beltline project is trying to do. I don't think even the biggest optimist thinks anybody is going to commute on the BeltLine.You're severely overstating your case. I would use the beltline to commute if I worked somewhere along the beltline route. As it is, I work downtown and can walk to work from my house, so I personally will not need the Beltline for commuting. Many others definitely will use it for that, though. No different than MARTA in that regard. It's a neat project, but I'd throw it on the back burner and funnel all of its resources into rail that people will actually use. Why give a huge gift to communities that stonewalled transit for decades?
answers in bold.
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Old 04-03-2012, 10:17 AM
 
2,407 posts, read 2,610,897 times
Reputation: 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
No it isn't. It's a rail line that will be cool, but will do practically nothing to make actually getting around the city any easier. I don't think even the biggest optimist thinks anybody is going to commute on the BeltLine. It's a neat project, but I'd throw it on the back burner and funnel all of its resources into rail that people will actually use.
I'm with you on this one. The Beltline is a cool idea, but it hardly does anything to address the real transportation issues in the region. Of course you will have the same predictable people chime in and talk about how they'll ride the train, but will it have a significant regional impact? No. It is a lifestyle project that brings more parks and green space to these neighborhoods. That is a good thing. However, lets not talk about it like the transportation element of it is revolutionary. I wouldn't spend TSPLOST funds on it because I don't view it is a transportation project that warrants the amount of money allocated to it.
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,147 posts, read 16,147,338 times
Reputation: 4894
The BeltLine was added to the TSPLOST because of its economic impact on the areas. It will increase private investment within the corridor and therefore increase the tax revenue within the TAD. If we're going to pick at projects why is there projects for aviation in Cobb County? What does that do to relieve traffic?
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:43 AM
 
2,407 posts, read 2,610,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
The BeltLine was added to the TSPLOST because of its economic impact on the areas. It will increase private investment within the corridor and therefore increase the tax revenue within the TAD. If we're going to pick at projects why is there projects for aviation in Cobb County? What does that do to relieve traffic?
Get rid of those too.

I single out the Beltline because the amount allocated for the Beltline. The last I checked, this is a transportation initiative and not a redevelopment plan. I'm not saying the plan is not worthwhile, because I think it is, but it shouldn't come out of this pot of money IMO.
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Old 04-03-2012, 12:00 PM
 
7,687 posts, read 9,530,024 times
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Even some Beltline supporters are against the TSPLOST funding it.

I don't fully understand it, but watch that video I posted it. It has something to do with screwing the areas out of bond money. This might be a way of trying to take control away from the Beltline project people.

Regardless, it does not belong on a transportation plan. Nor does the airplane stuff, whatever that is.
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