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Old 06-27-2012, 07:33 PM
 
13,168 posts, read 21,529,812 times
Reputation: 4278

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
I don't know, Suwanee has done a pretty good job with its largely manufactured downtown.
And so has Smyrna. Totally awesome.


I think manufactured and created downtowns/town centers/town greens will be the saving grace for the suburbs.


And for Metro Atlanta--more municipalization (after the city proper expands and annexes some key areas first).

Last edited by aries4118; 06-27-2012 at 07:42 PM..
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Old 06-27-2012, 07:36 PM
 
13,168 posts, read 21,529,812 times
Reputation: 4278
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
Suburbs are baaaad.....

They aren't walkable - suburbs makes plans for walkable community

Oh yea... they aren't organic enough - suburbs becomes walkable

New businesses and residents move in... not everything is developed by a single company

Oh yea... They have old people!!!!!!


cqholt... always a cynic if it is in the evil OTP!

Not every place can be a nice community, be old, have character that took 50+ years to develop over night.

But if you want to build a new community... you have to start somewhere. They are starting to do the right thing, but you don't see that... you just keep criticizing them because it won't be what you want it to be right off the bat. Yet they are showing great signs of improvement.

This.
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Old 06-27-2012, 07:41 PM
 
13,168 posts, read 21,529,812 times
Reputation: 4278
And this awesome article explains what needs to be done in the suburbs. Remember people, it is better to think "both and," not "either or."


The Grave Health Risks of Unwalkable Communities - Design - The Atlantic Cities#

...
But in modern times, aren't we stuck with these car-dependent neighborhoods? No, we aren't. As the PBS series Designing Healthy Communities showed, there are plenty of good examples of neighborhoods that point the way. More walkable, transit-oriented suburban neighborhoods such as Oregon's Orenco Station prove that it's possible to offer places where people will choose to walk more. (At Orenco Station in 2002, 17 percent of residents reported walking to shopping 5 or more times a week. By 2007, that number was up to an amazing 50 percent.)
We argue that it's time to "retrofit the suburbs," adding living streets and centers for humanity – young and old, rich and poor – to formerly sprawling areas. These places are not just healthier, they offer a better quality of life, and if they have a mix of services and public transit, monthly transportation costs can be lower, too.
The idea is not to "take away people's yards," or any other choice. The idea is to provide more choices, in how to get around and what to do outdoors, and especially, more healthy choices. You might still live in your current suburban house, if you want, but find that you can now walk to a small town center nearby that has a bus or streetcar stop, a little park, and a market. As a result you can get a quart of milk without burning up a quart of gasoline. Along the way, you might see a neighbor, exchange some news, or bring the kids for a nice walk. And you might not just be improving your life: you could be saving it.
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Old 06-27-2012, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Georgia
5,144 posts, read 4,167,932 times
Reputation: 2947
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
You can't just create a downtown, its something that has to develop on its own. A total failure on Sandy Springs trying to create an identity. Sandy Springs is nothing but nice homes, nice to middle apartments and strip malls. The kroger shopping center is nice, but still a sea of parking lot in the middle of the shops.
Totally disagree. Because the SS government isn't forcing this on the municipality. It's working closely with local businesses to see what kind of overhaul would best suit their needs. That's part of why the process is taking a long time to get off the ground--SS would rather take their time and get it right. (See what happened in Alpharetta as an example of how rushing the process can backfire.)
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Old 06-27-2012, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Georgia
5,144 posts, read 4,167,932 times
Reputation: 2947
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
And this awesome article explains what needs to be done in the suburbs. Remember people, it is better to think "both and," not "either or."


The Grave Health Risks of Unwalkable Communities - Design - The Atlantic Cities#

...
But in modern times, aren't we stuck with these car-dependent neighborhoods? No, we aren't. As the PBS series Designing Healthy Communities showed, there are plenty of good examples of neighborhoods that point the way. More walkable, transit-oriented suburban neighborhoods such as Oregon's Orenco Station prove that it's possible to offer places where people will choose to walk more. (At Orenco Station in 2002, 17 percent of residents reported walking to shopping 5 or more times a week. By 2007, that number was up to an amazing 50 percent.)
We argue that it's time to "retrofit the suburbs," adding living streets and centers for humanity young and old, rich and poor to formerly sprawling areas. These places are not just healthier, they offer a better quality of life, and if they have a mix of services and public transit, monthly transportation costs can be lower, too.
The idea is not to "take away people's yards," or any other choice. The idea is to provide more choices, in how to get around and what to do outdoors, and especially, more healthy choices. You might still live in your current suburban house, if you want, but find that you can now walk to a small town center nearby that has a bus or streetcar stop, a little park, and a market. As a result you can get a quart of milk without burning up a quart of gasoline. Along the way, you might see a neighbor, exchange some news, or bring the kids for a nice walk. And you might not just be improving your life: you could be saving it.
Yes, yes, yes! People should not be forced to drive, neither should they be forced NOT to drive. Give them OPTIONS. An all-of-the-above approach is the way to go.
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:55 PM
 
8,096 posts, read 9,934,857 times
Reputation: 6053
Quote:
17 percent of residents reported walking to shopping 5 or more times a week. By 2007, that number was up to an amazing 50 percent.)
Who in the world are these people? I don't know anybody who GOES shopping 5 times a week, regardless of how they get there.
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Old 06-27-2012, 11:09 PM
 
13,168 posts, read 21,529,812 times
Reputation: 4278
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
Who in the world are these people? I don't know anybody who GOES shopping 5 times a week, regardless of how they get there.

"Goes Shopping" could also include just stopping by the store...
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Old 06-28-2012, 03:46 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
1,052 posts, read 1,335,138 times
Reputation: 497
Quote:
Originally Posted by toll_booth View Post
Totally disagree. Because the SS government isn't forcing this on the municipality. It's working closely with local businesses to see what kind of overhaul would best suit their needs. That's part of why the process is taking a long time to get off the ground--SS would rather take their time and get it right. (See what happened in Alpharetta as an example of how rushing the process can backfire.)
Completely Agree!!
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Old 06-28-2012, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,984 posts, read 16,974,129 times
Reputation: 5214
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
Suburbs are baaaad.....

They aren't walkable - suburbs makes plans for walkable community

Oh yea... they aren't organic enough - suburbs becomes walkable

New businesses and residents move in... not everything is developed by a single company

Oh yea... They have old people!!!!!!


cqholt... always a cynic if it is in the evil OTP!

Not every place can be a nice community, be old, have character that took 50+ years to develop over night.

But if you want to build a new community... you have to start somewhere. They are starting to do the right thing, but you don't see that... you just keep criticizing them because it won't be what you want it to be right off the bat. Yet they are showing great signs of improvement.
Never said that, just giving my opinion about a strip-mall suburb trying to create a downtown. Now Roswell, Norcross, Marrietta, and Lawrenceville they have traditional downtowns. But Sandy Springs is trying to create an identity. Anyone else not see how this goes against their small government, privatize public service ideology?
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Old 06-28-2012, 07:40 AM
 
9,124 posts, read 32,483,080 times
Reputation: 3530
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Anyone else not see how this goes against their small government, privatize public service ideology?
They're trying to generate business, which will increase property tax ratables, as well as generating sales tax revenue. This will lessen the load on the taxpayers, and give them additional funds to pay for the privatized services that they have. How is any of this changing their "small government, privatize public service ideaology"?????
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