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Old 05-09-2012, 09:52 AM
 
230 posts, read 401,947 times
Reputation: 85

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgiaLakeSearch View Post

The wealthiest suburbs would be Dunwoody & Sandy Springs most likely.
>$200,000
Alpharetta: 13.5%
Dunwoody: 14.7%
Roswell: 9%
Sandy Springs: 15%

>$150,000
Alpharetta: 10.1%
Dunwoody: 11.2%
Roswell: 13%
Sandy Springs: 8.8%

Dunwoody News | Dunwoody named most expensive suburb in Georgia

I still think Sandy Springs is more expensive. Anyway just wanted to provide some numbers.
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Old 05-09-2012, 09:55 AM
 
230 posts, read 401,947 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
Before I moved back to NYC, they were redoing/installing sidewalks on Roswell Rd. between Morgan Falls and Nothridge. That area you speak of is an older part of Dunwoody; going towards Shallowford Rd. I know the area. I do believe in beautifying the area as I still own my home there, but I dont like over developing.
Agree. It just needs to be modernized and embellished. The city should not be acting as a land bank.
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Old 05-09-2012, 10:10 AM
 
188 posts, read 241,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0311 View Post
"Cherry picked stats" ....love it. Isn't it more important that more people have a higher income, rather than a few people have really, really high incomes that skew the stat?

So if 99% of the county is below the poverty line, and 1% are billionaires, you'd prefer that stat because you might be able to get a better per capita number? That's not affluence, although it makes for good statistics.
Agreed, median is the better measure but I think to address the other poster's concerns, a measure of median individual income would be better than median household income. The theory, at least, that more singles live in the city and more families (dual income) live in the suburbs.
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Old 05-09-2012, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
7,844 posts, read 14,721,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingFox View Post
Agreed, median is the better measure but I think to address the other poster's concerns, a measure of median individual income would be better than median household income. The theory, at least, that more singles live in the city and more families (dual income) live in the suburbs.
I think you're splitting hairs. Does it make a difference if my household income is the result of 100% my income or 50% my income and 50% my wife's income? In my case, I earn 100% of the income in my household, but the expenses and economic impact are the same. Same is true when you have two younger "single" people who live together, although they show as individuals for census and tax purposes.

The point that is lost among the statistical debate is that the suburbs are not these way out collections of ignorant, poor, uncaring (some would say racist), and unsophisticated people who don't want to "contribute to the common good", and want to waste gasoline to sit in traffic all day. As well, the corollary is that urban residents of the City of Atlanta are not all educated, affluent, sophisticated, caring, environmentally and socially responsible people who know what's best for all society.

The fact is that suburban residents statistically have higher household incomes. Why that is the case could be attributed to many possible reasons, including having greater education and/or work/life experience. That's subjective.
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Old 05-09-2012, 11:26 AM
 
1,114 posts, read 1,969,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0311 View Post
I think you're splitting hairs. Does it make a difference if my household income is the result of 100% my income or 50% my income and 50% my wife's income? In my case, I earn 100% of the income in my household, but the expenses and economic impact are the same. Same is true when you have two younger "single" people who live together, although they show as individuals for census and tax purposes.

The point that is lost among the statistical debate is that the suburbs are not these way out collections of ignorant, poor, uncaring (some would say racist), and unsophisticated people who don't want to "contribute to the common good", and want to waste gasoline to sit in traffic all day. As well, the corollary is that urban residents of the City of Atlanta are not all educated, affluent, sophisticated, caring, environmentally and socially responsible people who know what's best for all society.

The fact is that suburban residents statistically have higher household incomes. Why that is the case could be attributed to many possible reasons, including having greater education and/or work/life experience. That's subjective.
It doesn't matter who in the household earns the income but the number of people the total income supports. That has a big impact on the lifestyle you can afford. My income was much lower when I was a practical nomad living in Vinings, Lilburn, Duluth, or Marietta. That said, it was still higher Forsyth's median and I had basically zero liabilities. A 5k bicycle or 35k new car seemed to be reasonable expenditures since I was renting for $500/mon and saving ~30% of my income at 25. Take that same income for someone 5-6 yrs older and spread it over a family of 4 and you're barely making the mortgage payments on the 4 bdr house and the payments on the minivan especially if you have to try to buy in a top school district.

Everyone has to make choices on what's important to their lives and it's hardly a new concept. I'm sure no one loves a 1hr+ commute (I start road raging after 15 min) but it's a matter of priorities (school districts/space/etc). A Wieland cookie cutter townhouse community is no different than a Novare cookie cutter highrise condo. They're targeted for specific lifestyle tracks but it's not like there's an art appreciation exam to live intown. There are plenty of uneducated/unmotivated people here as there are anywhere but claiming a bedroom community having higher median household income as a sign of affluence ignores age/household size/etc.
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Old 05-10-2012, 07:26 AM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,514,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
Meh. Suburban park.

This place probably stands little chance of having homeless people sleeping in the playground at night. Kids probably won't have to play around empty beer cans and needles. What's the fun in that?

There's no action. You're not likely to see crack deals going down here ever. Speaking of crack, I bet the nearest crack house is miles away instead of houses away. No diversity!

Probably the sidewalks will be concrete that kids can ride bikes on like in the picture. If they don't learn to ride on dilapidated hex pavers, how are they going to learn to weather life's bumps?

Those houses are cookie cutter. Probably they will be turn key ready and won't require tens of thousands of dollars of renovations before they are livable. No, thank you!

I bet the schools are even decent . What good is an education if it doesn't include the school of hard knocks? If children don't learn that discipline problems should take more time than education lessons, how are they to succeed later in life?

Suburban development. Who needs it?

Here folks is the mentality of American Suburban residents. That being urban and walkable and having character/culture means drugs, crime, minorities and bad schools. The same mentality that keeps us from moving foward with transit or any kind of substainable living. Once again it will take a generation of old farts to die before progression happens.
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Old 05-10-2012, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
7,844 posts, read 14,721,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
Here folks is the mentality of American Suburban residents. That being urban and walkable and having character/culture means drugs, crime, minorities and bad schools. The same mentality that keeps us from moving foward with transit or any kind of substainable living.
That may be the opinion and perception of one individual, but please do not tar all suburbanites with that same broad brush. My issue is not with a lifestyle, but with being asked to pay for others to have the privilege to live that lifestyle.

I grew up in the city and visit cities all over the world, but I prefer to live a suburban lifestyle. I do think that you cannot ignore the fact that most US cities have poor public schools and generally higher crime and drugs than suburban areas. Some of that is due to a higher concentration of poor.

People do have to be careful not to assume that correlation implies causation. That's the mistake you are pointing out, and I agree with you on that point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
Once again it will take a generation of old farts to die before progression happens.
Not sure what you deem as an "old fart" but I can tell you that folks in my demographic (40's and 50's) are what keep this country going, and there are "old farts" across many aspects of the political and social spectrum. Again...broad brush much?

I constantly wonder if I was as naive and blind as some of the 20 and 30 somethings I see now, when I was younger. I continually try to instill in my teenage children a more realistic view of our society. It's OK to be idealistic to a point, but delusional thinking helps no one.
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Old 05-10-2012, 09:15 AM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,514,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0311 View Post
Not sure what you deem as an "old fart" but I can tell you that folks in my demographic (40's and 50's) are what keep this country going, and there are "old farts" across many aspects of the political and social spectrum. Again...broad brush much?

.
Your generation put us in a debt ridden finicial hell and then have the nerve to call us " lazy" when we can't get a decent job. That is not something to boast about.
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Old 05-10-2012, 10:46 AM
 
9,124 posts, read 32,483,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
Your generation put us in a debt ridden finicial hell and then have the nerve to call us " lazy" when we can't get a decent job. That is not something to boast about.
I don't call your generation "lazy" when you can't find a job in a down economy.

I call you "lazy" when you won't go find a part-time job during high school to help pay for your own car, or gas for your parents' car, because you're too busy playing the latest version of "Grand Theft Auto" or "HALO" on the X-Box that your parents bought you. And don't give me the "there's no jobs to be had" line- you can cut your neighbors' grass if that's what it takes.

I call you "lazy" when you need to take a year off after high school or after college to "find yourself" by backpacking across Europe with a bunch of your friends.

I call you "lazy" when you decide to major in "gay and lesbian studies" or "French romantic literature" and wonder why you can't find a job other than at The GAP. Maybe if you majored in something that had a real-world application, or (god forbid) learned a trade, you wouldn't have it so rough.
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Old 05-10-2012, 11:00 AM
 
8,096 posts, read 9,934,857 times
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Quote:
Your generation put us in a debt ridden finicial hell and then have the nerve to call us " lazy" when we can't get a decent job. That is not something to boast about.
You sound like someone with no motivation or ideas. And you just want to blame everybody else for your problems. That is probably what is going to eventually make the U.S. more like Europe, with entitlements and socialism. It's working out great for them! Just ask Greece, France, or Spain.

Instead of complaining about the world, why don't you get off your behind and make something that people want? Or carve a niche for yourself?

I'm not that much older than you. I'm part of "Generation X." You know, the slackers. We weren't supposed to amount to much, we were a bunch of deadbeats who hated the world and just didn't care. Then we helped create the best economy this country has ever seen. And we'll do it again.

People who seriously can't find jobs aren't lazy. The problem is, too many people would rather sponge off others or collect unemployment rather than hustling bagging groceries, working construction, or some other kind of menial job. I don't necessarily blame the kids that much because they are products of their environments. Coddled by parents and getting trophies just for showing up.

Welcome to the world. We don't have a trophy for you. However, a few are still available for people who actually win.
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