U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-12-2012, 05:19 PM
Box
 
382 posts, read 537,445 times
Reputation: 232

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
Replacing low income people with middle and high income is addressing the issue. I don't understand why you wont accept the fact that low income people grouped together has a higher likilyhood to breed crime.
Addressing the issue for who? How is that helping the folks who have lived there? It is their neighborhood too after all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-12-2012, 05:20 PM
 
7,727 posts, read 9,595,829 times
Reputation: 5711
High income people are probably bigger threats to elected officials because they have the intelligence and organizational abilities to launch campaigns against officials that they feel are ignoring them. They are more likely to write op-ed articles, complain to the media, post signs in their yards, whatever it takes.

I've never lived in a gentrifying neighborhood, so I'm not aware of tension between gentrifiers and long term residents.

If the long term residents are generally good neighbors, I don't see what the gentrifiers problems with them would be. You know, if they don't blast music at 2am, keep their grass cut, and all of the things that make a neighbor good.

Where do you suppose the tension is stemming from? I highly doubt high income people are saying, "my neighbor doesn't make as much money as I do, therefore I do not like him."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2012, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
21,143 posts, read 33,127,907 times
Reputation: 12793
Good for Kirkwood, and the efforts of its residents.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2012, 05:30 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,492,476 times
Reputation: 409
Quote:
Originally Posted by Box View Post
Addressing the issue for who? How is that helping the folks who have lived there? It is their neighborhood too after all.
No one is holding a gun to their head and telling them to leave. If they don't like people with money they should just get used to them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2012, 05:31 PM
Box
 
382 posts, read 537,445 times
Reputation: 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
High income people are probably bigger threats to elected officials because they have the intelligence and organizational abilities to launch campaigns against officials that they feel are ignoring them. They are more likely to write op-ed articles, complain to the media, post signs in their yards, whatever it takes.

I've never lived in a gentrifying neighborhood, so I'm not aware of tension between gentrifiers and long term residents.

If the long term residents are generally good neighbors, I don't see what the gentrifiers problems with them would be. You know, if they don't blast music at 2am, keep their grass cut, and all of the things that make a neighbor good.

Where do you suppose the tension is stemming from? I highly doubt high income people are saying, "my neighbor doesn't make as much money as I do, therefore I do not like him."
A lot of the tension is cultural. When somebody grows up in an area that is neglected, and has issues and the only time you see things getting addressed is when white folks move into the neighborhood (i know a lot of people would say its not about black or white but its about economics, but this is how a lot of people see it), which results in the city catering to them, then on would feel a little slighted. Not to mention the fact that when too many people with higher incomes move in, the folks who have lived there end up getting priced out of their neighborhoods. Like i said before, people should aim for neighborhoods which are mixed income and diverse, not aim to replace folks because they don't make a certain amount of money.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2012, 05:32 PM
Box
 
382 posts, read 537,445 times
Reputation: 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
No one is holding a gun to their head and telling them to leave. If they don't like people with money they should just get used to them.
No, but folks are pushing/using governmental policies and business policies to have them priced out. I just dont see how people can be so non-nonchalant about the adverse effects of gentrification, as if people don't matter because "Oh, they dont fit the demographic that I'm comfortable around."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2012, 05:35 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,492,476 times
Reputation: 409
Quote:
Originally Posted by Box View Post
A lot of the tension is cultural. When somebody grows up in an area that is neglected, and has issues and the only time you see things getting addressed is when white folks move into the neighborhood (i know a lot of people would say its not about black or white but its about economics, but this is how a lot of people see it), which results in the city catering to them, then on would feel a little slighted. Not to mention the fact that when too many people with higher incomes move in, the folks who have lived there end up getting priced out of their neighborhoods. Like i said before, people should aim for neighborhoods which are mixed income and diverse, not aim to replace folks because they don't make a certain amount of money.

It isn't the gentrifiers fault they make more money or that they are catered to. Blame the landlords if they raise the rent, the people moving in don't set the prices.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2012, 05:36 PM
Box
 
382 posts, read 537,445 times
Reputation: 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
It isn't the gentrifiers fault they make more money or that they are catered to. Blame the landlords if they raise the rent, the people moving in don't set the prices.
No its not their fault, but when people are openly saying "Lets get rid of low income folks so that folks with higher incomes can move in" and actively work to have these policies enforced, then yeah it's their fault.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2012, 05:37 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,492,476 times
Reputation: 409
Quote:
Originally Posted by Box View Post
No, but folks are pushing/using governmental policies and business policies to have them priced out. I just dont see how people can be so non-nonchalant about the adverse effects of gentrification, as if people don't matter because "Oh, they dont fit the demographic that I'm comfortable around."
Who is using the government to rise rent? If so that person is wrong. As for landlords take it up with them. If the poor people don't own the land then it isn't theirs anyway.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2012, 05:38 PM
 
187 posts, read 332,575 times
Reputation: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
Enjoy it while you can.

The metric shows it's getting LESS diverse by the day.

BTW, I'm not bashing you. Just admit that the metic is completely useless and meaningless. Or admit that more white people makes an area better. Which is it?
You most certainly ARE bashing him, and as a resident of Kirkwood, I take offense to it. Kirkwood is EXTREMELY diverse, and it doesnt take some stupid METRIC (whether it is useless or not) to see that. If you dont like that, then GTFO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top