U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-11-2013, 06:51 AM
 
200 posts, read 405,700 times
Reputation: 79

Advertisements

I've been thinking about this. I was hoping to hear some opinions on the home value side of things. (Setting aside the Beltline concerns for a moment) Assuming there isn't a fire sale on houses as soon as the development is built, how much could home values REALLY drop? (And I mean drop compared to now, not compared to hypothetical home values when the Beltline is complete) It will still be an intown neighborhood full of young families and a strong neighborhood association. IMO there will always be a market for that moving forward.

My wife and I just moved from a place we were renting in Underwood Hills. (And yes I know there are plenty of differences between neighborhoods, but you can still make a comparison as far as consequences from a big box development) There is a very similar development with a Wal-Mart on Howell Mill. Granted it is 4 lanes right there, but a couple hundred yards either direction on H.M. and it turns into 2. The traffic gets BRUTAL on that road. However, home values in that area do not seem to have taken a dive. And honestly, you can still walk to stores and restaurants but you just need to be a little more careful.

Like I said, I am totally opposed to the project as proposed and I'm not arguing that its a good thing. However, I am anxious to hear some opinions on whether or not people actually believe home values will decrease in the long run as opposed to just slowing down growth in the future.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-11-2013, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,209 posts, read 16,223,527 times
Reputation: 4923
Quote:
Um, I wouldn't count on it. Remember, the mayor's office pressed VERY hard for approval of the Lindbergh big box project as well.
They are just salivating over the tax revenue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2013, 08:06 AM
 
9,931 posts, read 6,929,113 times
Reputation: 3022
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankster87 View Post
Also why was the city's legal department aligned with Fu-ckya? I thought the city was in favor of the Glenwood vision?
The BZA council actually seemed very accommodating towards the neighborhood, and I think the city and its elected officials are largely in support of the Beltline and the neighborhood in this fight. However, the COA planning office seems to be very much be in support of the developers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mjedwards409
I was hoping to hear some opinions on the home value side of things. (Setting aside the Beltline concerns for a moment) Assuming there isn't a fire sale on houses as soon as the development is built, how much could home values REALLY drop? (And I mean drop compared to now, not compared to hypothetical home values when the Beltline is complete) It will still be an intown neighborhood full of young families and a strong neighborhood association. IMO there will always be a market for that moving forward.
To be honest I don't think it will be that bad. Pretty much all the nice areas of town already have big boxes in them. I don't think it will hurt land values except maybe a slight hit for anyone directly of Bill Kennedy or Glenwood. And I think increasing land values will force it to be redeveloped within a decade.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2013, 08:15 AM
 
28,178 posts, read 24,730,127 times
Reputation: 9560
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
...I think the city and its elected officials are largely in support of the Beltline and the neighborhood in this fight. However, the COA planning office seems to be very much be in support of the developers.
The planning department staff are employees of the city, working under the direction of the mayor and city council.

If the elected officials wanted this project stopped (or changed), they would do so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2013, 08:23 AM
 
28,178 posts, read 24,730,127 times
Reputation: 9560
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjedwards409 View Post
Like I said, I am totally opposed to the project as proposed and I'm not arguing that its a good thing. However, I am anxious to hear some opinions on whether or not people actually believe home values will decrease in the long run as opposed to just slowing down growth in the future.
Housing values tend to reflect many factors, and in strong neighborhoods they can usually overcome traffic and development problems. So I don't think this project will cause a direct hit to housing values, at least in the long run.

However, what you lose with big-box-in-a-sea-of-parking is the opportunity to make the area less car dependent, and more oriented toward pedestrians and bikes. Once you allow one big box development, you have more or less established the character of the area and it becomes much more difficult to encourage smaller scale, pedestrian and transit oriented development in the area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2013, 08:58 AM
 
9,931 posts, read 6,929,113 times
Reputation: 3022
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
The planning department staff are employees of the city, working under the direction of the mayor and city council.

If the elected officials wanted this project stopped (or changed), they would do so.
That's like saying this is all the presidents fault. We are not a dictatorship, we have a government built on separation and checks and balances. As much as we might not like it, the land owner and developer are protected by the same property rights and laws as you and me. The mayor cannot swoop in and seize property at his own discretion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2013, 09:01 AM
 
9,931 posts, read 6,929,113 times
Reputation: 3022
Good article: In Defense of The Atlanta BeltLine Master Plans - ATLGal's Blog - Midtown, GA Patch

Don't forget that the developer has deep pockets for lawyers. The neighborhood is dependent on donations. If you do care about this, put your money where your mouth is: Smart Growth Atlanta I have already donated a good chunk.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2013, 10:16 AM
 
28,178 posts, read 24,730,127 times
Reputation: 9560
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
That's like saying this is all the presidents fault. We are not a dictatorship, we have a government built on separation and checks and balances. As much as we might not like it, the land owner and developer are protected by the same property rights and laws as you and me. The mayor cannot swoop in and seize property at his own discretion.
That's not a correct analogy. Nobody is talking about seizing the property and that would obviously be outlandish and illegal.

This is simply a zoning and land use issue, and that is a policy decision that the mayor and city council do control. That's one of the primary reasons they are elected to office. The employees of the planning department are hired to implement those policy decisions, not to act as some sort of independent authority.

And sure developers have the same property rights as every other citizen. But they don't have greater rights than anyone else. Assume you owned some property within the Beltline overlay that was designated for residential development in a walkable, transit oriented format -- would you be permitted to blow that off and build a huge parking lot with big box retail?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2013, 10:22 AM
 
28,178 posts, read 24,730,127 times
Reputation: 9560
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
Don't forget that the developer has deep pockets for lawyers. The neighborhood is dependent on donations. If you do care about this, put your money where your mouth is: Smart Growth Atlanta I have already donated a good chunk.
One would hope that our elected officials would fight to uphold the city's carefully developed master plans, rather than leaving residents to battle wealthy developers on their own. Much less siding with said wealthy developers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2013, 11:09 AM
 
28,178 posts, read 24,730,127 times
Reputation: 9560
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
And I think increasing land values will force it to be redeveloped within a decade.
I can't think of any big box shopping center that has been redeveloped within 10 years. Not to be a wet blanket, but if it's built it will likely be around for a long time to come.

I'm certainly no expert but it seems to me that major development opportunities typically come around in 40-50 year cycles. That's one of the reasons setting the character correctly is so important (and that's why master plans are created).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top