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Old 06-18-2012, 02:27 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,498,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10 feet tall View Post
What is southern about that? DO Chicago, NYC, and LA not have suburbs?
Getting married,having kids and buying a suburban home at a relatively young age seems to be a southern thing. As you can see from statistics above that's even changing in the ATL.
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Old 06-18-2012, 02:34 PM
 
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I think the article was saying that it's still happening, just at a later age, right? Or did I misread it?
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Old 06-18-2012, 02:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
I'm sure everyone wants to own at some point but the difference is where. This is the only study that I've ever seen that said millenials want to be in suburbs.
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Old 06-18-2012, 02:40 PM
JPD
 
11,953 posts, read 14,608,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
50/50 split? Huh?
That is referring to the fact that the state mandates how MARTA gets to spend its money.

50% has to go to operations.
50% has to go to capitol projects.
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Old 06-18-2012, 03:21 PM
 
616 posts, read 884,956 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
Getting married,having kids and buying a suburban home at a relatively young age seems to be a southern thing. As you can see from statistics above that's even changing in the ATL.

Oh I see, your issue is with the age. But is 30 (or even late 20's) really too young to have a young family?
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Old 06-18-2012, 06:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10 feet tall View Post
Oh I see, your issue is with the age. But is 30 (or even late 20's) really too young to have a young family?
Apparently for people outside of the south in large urban cities.Regardless even if they do the trend of running to outer burbs seems to be dropping in favor of denser areas.
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Old 06-18-2012, 07:05 PM
 
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I think the truth actually lies closer to the middle.

It sounds to me that most people still do want to own houses. Most want to live in the suburbs. But instead of living in sterile suburbs, they want to live somewhere with a sense of community, which means parks, restaurants, and a downtown area.

A lot of people on this board will say, "That means they all want to be in places like Decatur or Kirkwood!"

Not so fast.

A lot of them might want to be in areas like Roswell, Duluth, or Suwanee. Those are suburbs that also fit the things that the people in the article are seeking.

That's why you see places like Alpharetta starting to make plans to build downtown areas. That's why areas like Peachtree Corners and Brookhaven are talking about incorporating (well, Peachtree Corners already did). People seem to favor suburbs that have individual identities and features, and the suburbs are changing to accomodate that desire.

I don't think it necessarily means denser areas. The article says people want to be within 3 miles of their downtown areas. I live in Duluth, which can't by any measure be considered dense. However, I am much less than 3 miles from downtown Duluth. Many residents of Suwanee, Roswell, etc. are within 3 miles of their downtown areas, but those areas aren't dense.

My personal take is what people are looking for are the benefits of low density areas, meaning they can have yards and decent sized houses, but they also want the benefits of high density areas, like a definite entertainment and shopping district they can frequent instead of driving from store to store to get different items.
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Old 06-18-2012, 09:21 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,498,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
I think the truth actually lies closer to the middle.

It sounds to me that most people still do want to own houses. Most want to live in the suburbs. But instead of living in sterile suburbs, they want to live somewhere with a sense of community, which means parks, restaurants, and a downtown area.

A lot of people on this board will say, "That means they all want to be in places like Decatur or Kirkwood!"

Not so fast.

A lot of them might want to be in areas like Roswell, Duluth, or Suwanee. Those are suburbs that also fit the things that the people in the article are seeking.

That's why you see places like Alpharetta starting to make plans to build downtown areas. That's why areas like Peachtree Corners and Brookhaven are talking about incorporating (well, Peachtree Corners already did). People seem to favor suburbs that have individual identities and features, and the suburbs are changing to accomodate that desire.

I don't think it necessarily means denser areas. The article says people want to be within 3 miles of their downtown areas. I live in Duluth, which can't by any measure be considered dense. However, I am much less than 3 miles from downtown Duluth. Many residents of Suwanee, Roswell, etc. are within 3 miles of their downtown areas, but those areas aren't dense.

My personal take is what people are looking for are the benefits of low density areas, meaning they can have yards and decent sized houses, but they also want the benefits of high density areas, like a definite entertainment and shopping district they can frequent instead of driving from store to store to get different items.
No matter how you slice it density plays a role in that. You can't say " people want to live close to walk-able amenities but they don't want density". The two are mutually exclusive in most cases. Also, lets be real, most of the suburb downtowns don't offer much of anything but a old historic feeling. You aren't gonna do much shopping or playing at these cute little downtowns with Roswell, Vinning, Marrieta and Alpharetta downtown being exceptions and even then there is a huge cultural and retail offering drought in those downtowns. Most major festivals,events,shopping and bars are still gonna happen in the Perimeter.

I am not sure how other cities work but in Atlanta ITP still dominates in what most people want in a dense walk-able and cultural center with close by amenities. If perimeter center gets more of a nightlife I can see that being the idea "compact" suburb which is why it is currently my favorite suburb next to Decatur.
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Old 06-18-2012, 10:06 PM
 
Location: East Side of ATL
4,170 posts, read 5,796,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
How late do the buses run?
Most run until the last train but others lines end at 9 or 11pm at night...
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Old 06-18-2012, 11:40 PM
 
7,789 posts, read 9,669,722 times
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I think your suppositions are a bit off.

Quote:
You can't say " people want to live close to walk-able amenities but they don't want density". The two are mutually exclusive in most cases
That's untrue. You can have walkable amenities in places with quite low density. Buckhead Village was a good example of that. Everything was very walkable, but most of Buckhead isn't that dense. All those downtowns like Smyrna and Roswell are all walkable, but not in densely populated areas. Even the mixed use shopping centers like the Forum shops are all walkable, but not in dense areas. All you'd have to do is add a bit more diversity to the businesses there and it would satisfy the desires of many of the people we are talking about. Commercial density is extremely easy to create even in areas where residential density is low. I think that's what people want, they are looking for that commercial density without wanting to give up their own personal residential space.

Quote:
Also, lets be real, most of the suburb downtowns don't offer much of anything but a old historic feeling. You aren't gonna do much shopping or playing at these cute little downtowns with Roswell, Vinning, Marrieta and Alpharetta downtown being exceptions and even then there is a huge cultural and retail offering drought in those downtowns
I guess you haven't been to downtown Roswell lately. You can do TONS of playing there, it's like a miniature Virginia Highland. It's kind of beside the point, though, because most people just want an area to rally around and go to for festivals and events. Downtown Suwanee is a perfect example, you're not going to eat out there every week, but during the summer there is pretty much something happening in the downtown area every weekend. That's what the residents like. It's not that it has incredible shopping and dining, it's just that it's the center of town, the place where the events take place. Even in high density areas the downtowns basically serve this purpose. It's not like you're going to do tons of shopping and playing in downtown Inman Park, Kirkwood, or Candler Park.

Quote:
Most major festivals,events,shopping and bars are still gonna happen in the Perimeter.
Yep. The major ones will. The thing is, as people get older, they tend to prefer the smaller more manageable events. In my early 30s I stopped attending Dogwood because it just became such a clusterf*ck and too much trouble. Inman Park festival is the only one I still make it a point to attend, and quite honestly, even it is starting to get to be too much trouble. And that's just for me, I can't even imagine what it would be like trying to keep up with kids there. Couples with children are happy going to the events in Suwanee, Norcross, and Duluth. Maybe there are events here and there like Inman Park they want to go to, but they can commute to those. They aren't going to choose a place to live based on it having festivals and bars. Those things just aren't as important to people trying to raise families.

Quote:
I am not sure how other cities work but in Atlanta ITP still dominates in what most people want in a dense walk-able and cultural center with close by amenities.
I think you're viewing this through the eyes of a young single man when the article was talking about couples who have children or want to have them.

Quote:
If perimeter center gets more of a nightlife I can see that being the idea "compact" suburb which is why it is currently my favorite suburb next to Decatur.
That's because you are a single young man. I don't think couples who have or want children are as concerned with how much nightlife their suburb offers. So long as there are places to get dinner and maybe a dessert or night cap, I don't know how much they care about having pubs that are open until 3am.

Personally, I have no problem with Perimeter Center, but I don't see why you would like it since by it's nature it basically completely defies the entire concept of walkability. Sure, Park Place is walkable, but where can you walk from there? I guess maybe over to the mall..... I suppose you CAN walk, it's just that nobody DOES walk. Of course, the very notion of walkability is also completely overrated, particularly in an area like Perimeter where there is ample free parking. In that case, proximity is more important than walkability. If you can get somewhere in under 5 minutes, that's good enough.
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