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Old 06-24-2012, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Jawjah
2,468 posts, read 1,528,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post

The new suburbs/exurbs are exceptionally red socially and fiscally.
And these would be...Lawrenceville, Buford, et al?

I am in Norcross and find it to be very diverse and far from exceptionally red.
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Old 06-24-2012, 02:57 AM
 
Location: North Fulton
1,039 posts, read 1,961,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
well I can't speak for rcsteiner, but from my experiences growing up here... it depends where you are. The suburbs are very red. They are less red in parts of Gwinnett, Cobb, Clayton where the areas are denser, more diverse, and attracting immigrants at a rapid rate, but many of the bedroom communities within them are bright red....

some are red for different reasons. Some are more accepting of social issues, but not fiscal issues and some are not very accepting of social issues at all. Some people are actually good natured and haven't been exposed to many people with lifestyles different from their own and some people flat out aren't.

Speaking about the LGBT population in particular I can imagine people in the chruch I grew up with being very friendly with someone who is gay one-on-one (and would probably say in their mind... oh bless his heart...), but would they would be adamantly against politically and religiously. I would say generation Y is coming around more.

...and I definitely knew people that would be more uncomfortable and combative about the issue personally and politically.

The new suburbs/exurbs are exceptionally red socially and fiscally.
In metro Atlanta, most of the regular voters in the outer suburbs are definitely red / conservative. In the older days, say early 1990s, the conservative voters largely lived outside of 285. Definitely not that simple to say that anymore due to a more diverse population in the metro and lots of demographic changes to local neighborhoods.

Some ATL suburbs that have become more diverse over time, are definitely blue. Most of the regular voters in rural Georgia are very conservative and tend to vote Republican in most areas.

I do think it is plausible, in a decade or 2, the voters could come back to voting more for Democratic candidates more in this state due to many reasons, some maybe unforseen at the current time. I think GA could be come a swing state.

I mostly grew up in Atlanta and have seen people of all political stripes. I try to avoid talking about politics, but sometimes when people bring it up, I may debate, it just depends on the situation. I basically tell people this who want to hear what I have to say if they want to discuss politics: the Tea Party movement is largely a populist reaction to the current economic times and really nothing specific to GA, per se.

To the OP, I would call Norcross (and most of Gwinnett) pretty divided between blue and red.
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Old 06-24-2012, 03:07 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,458 posts, read 7,268,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rorqual View Post
And these would be...Lawrenceville, Buford, et al?

I am in Norcross and find it to be very diverse and far from exceptionally red.
yep, but Lawrenceville has been around for awhile. There are parts of the zip codes of lawrenceville that are new, but it is Gwinnett's county seat, so it was always a town and has little neighborhoods built in just about every decade the past 50 years.

You see more red in the older single family neighborhoods around Peachtree corners, western parts of Duluth, Lilburn south of the railroad tracks, and then circling Lawrenceville from the southeast to the north going towards Buford.

I managed to track down a precinct level data map of the 2004 election results for the state of Georgia. It is really interesting to look at, but it is also a 6MB file for google earth!

It shows the areas that are blue ... barely... red... barely... and then the areas that are extreme red... extreme blue...

I am attaching screen shots of my google earth browser. Keep in mind 2008 brought more blue into parts of the county. (I wish I had this same map for 2008)

The other thing I will add... in the primaries Gwinnett was the county with the largest amount of Republican primary voters in the state and they voted for Gingrich....
Attached Thumbnails
Atlanta --> GA a swing state?-2004_state.jpg   Atlanta --> GA a swing state?-2004_metro.jpg   Atlanta --> GA a swing state?-2004_gwinnett.jpg  
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Old 06-24-2012, 03:18 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,458 posts, read 7,268,204 times
Reputation: 4205
It might also be worthwhile to go to NYTimes Mapping america Mapping America ? Census Bureau 2005-9 American Community Survey - NYTimes.com

-recenter the map on Atlanta
-Click "housing and Families"
-Click "same-sex couples"

You can hover over every census tract and see what percentage of households have same-sex couples.

This might reveal some information. I would suspect most places above 1% offer some level of comfort for same-sex couples to locate there in way or another.

However, it is also hard to infer all areas that don't exceed that would be problematic for same-sex couples socially speaking. Same-sex couples might not choose to locate to some areas for other reasons.

...but I figured it was an extra layer of information to consider...
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Old 06-24-2012, 05:01 AM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 21,912,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rorqual View Post
Are you talking about Georgia or the Metro Atlanta area? It would be surprising to get that kind of conservative attitude in large doses in the metro area especially considering the large LGBT population and the general acceptance of that community in the area and the large number of immigrants.
The folks I'm talking about live in Metro Atlanta, mainly. Although some (perhaps most) of them grew up in other southern states or in areas of Georgia outside of the metro and moved here later on in life, which may well explain those attitudes. Most of the folks I know who currently live in Cobb, for example, were not born here in Cobb.

That makes sense given the tremendous growth Cobb County has seen (population was 196,793 in 1970, and is 688,078 today).

Last edited by rcsteiner; 06-24-2012 at 05:09 AM..
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Old 06-24-2012, 05:35 AM
 
Location: atlanta
3,967 posts, read 4,563,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rorqual View Post
Hello everyone,

I finally moved to Atlanta a couple of months ago and have been really enjoying it. The metro area is very diverse, the dining options are equally awesome (Buford highway has become a favorite) and there are shopping and social activities a plenty.

I am however a bit perplexed by a couple of things - on one side Atlanta seems progressive what with the Clean Air act, tons of diversity, and one of the largest LGBT populations in the country (and a city board that actively promotes it via gay-atlanta.com). On the otherhand for the past year or so the Georgia house and senate has been overtaken by TeaParty-Republican members and as a result there have been bills filtering through the state house (mix that with some local birther groups) which might be on par with the zaniness coming out of Arizona.

I am sort of fascinated with this disparity between Atlanta and Georgia as a whole and was just wondering if Georgia will be a swing state this year, or if the state will ever reach a more progressive/conservative swing state status like North Carolina (which, despite Atlanta's showmanship, is the real progressive "Deep South" state).
believe it or not, the places that the tea party types have gotten the most attention and have the biggest wins, are the rapidly growing suburbs and exurbs of atlanta, and not south georgia as many might think. if you look at the voting trends, the "reddest" counties in the state are in north georgia, in 2004 it was forsyth county, and in 2008 it was dawson county.

starting in at least the 80s, the suburbs became attractive for your white collar, higher income WASPy types, attracting people from all over the country because of the increase in high-paying jobs. now 9 in 10 residents of metro atlanta live in the suburbs.

people bash south and middle georgia a lot for being backwards compared to atlanta, but in reality there is a good mixture of blue and red counties in south georgia, and at least when it comes to the economic side of the equation, they appear to be more open to different political ideologies as those counties "swing" frequently.

take a look at creative loafings annual "golden sleaze" awardsó they award the biggest "do-nothing" and backwards state representatives in georgia, and many are surprised to see the biggest extreme right wing types are from the atlanta suburbs. of course there is corruption to be had in both parties, but since the republicans greatly outnumber the democrats in georgia, there's certainly more nonsense coming out of their side right now, and extremists rather than those willing to work together on both sides tend to create the most problems.
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Old 06-24-2012, 05:44 AM
 
Location: atlanta
3,967 posts, read 4,563,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
[...]We also have a bit of a libertarian streak in our population (urban/liberal and rural conservative alike)[...]
as a lifelong georgian (and somewhere between a democrat and a libertarian), that really makes me happy. you'll find that a lot when the super-liberal folks in town and the right wing tea party folks out of town can agree here in georgia on basic constitutional issues like the right to protest, opposing SOPA/PIPA, protecting privacy rights, etc.

it always shocks me when i hear folks from out of town, whether "liberal" or "conservative", talk about stuff like banning smoking in cars and cameras on streetcorners and all that nonsense. i love georgia because whether we're on the right or the left, we always keep our constitution nearby.
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Old 06-24-2012, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
266 posts, read 467,518 times
Reputation: 287
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryantm3 View Post
as a lifelong georgian (and somewhere between a democrat and a libertarian), that really makes me happy. you'll find that a lot when the super-liberal folks in town and the right wing tea party folks out of town can agree here in georgia on basic constitutional issues like the right to protest, opposing SOPA/PIPA, protecting privacy rights, etc.

it always shocks me when i hear folks from out of town, whether "liberal" or "conservative", talk about stuff like banning smoking in cars and cameras on streetcorners and all that nonsense. i love georgia because whether we're on the right or the left, we always keep our constitution nearby.
The constitution (however interpreted) may be close by but the bible is closer. One day the Latinos and blacks will turn this state around for the good.
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Old 06-24-2012, 08:59 AM
 
27,786 posts, read 24,826,396 times
Reputation: 16505
Quote:
Originally Posted by rorqual View Post
And these would be...Lawrenceville, Buford, et al?

I am in Norcross and find it to be very diverse and far from exceptionally red.
The core counties tend to be blue or blue-leaning. The others, not so much.
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Old 06-24-2012, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Jawjah
2,468 posts, read 1,528,898 times
Reputation: 1098
Thats a lot of great info folks - will be very helpful when I plan on buying a house with my family. Anymore detailed info will be very welcome.

Having been to almost all the main cities in Alabama I am just a bit wary of winding up in an extreme right wing suburb/city - I consider myself a center-left moderate who supports investment in education, research, and infrastructure, diversity, equal rights for all, green tech/recycling, responsible spending, and an innovative approach to starting a business (startups etc.). However I also like the climate and culture of the south and hence the move to Atlanta and not Boston or Chicago.
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