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Old 06-27-2012, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Grant Park, Atlanta
54 posts, read 48,924 times
Reputation: 19

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
People keep bringing up the " well if you grew up in the burbs it isn't a big deal" argument and it is just the opposite for many Gen Y people. Growing up in the burbs makes some fine with living there while it makes some of us like me hate the idea of putting our kids through that as well as living that lifestyle.

I liked the fact that I lived in a safe area and has woods to play in, but hated the fact that it was nearly impossible or a day trip to go anywhere or do anything. It was a trek just to get to a gas station to get candy, much less anywhere else without getting a ride. Getting my first car was like opening a new world. Having a neighborhood or schools friends was possible, but meeting up before we learned to drive or got cars was just a hassle if we didn't live in the same subdivision.

I wonder sometimes" wow, I spent too much time inside alone watching cartoons".
Oh, these images reminded be of Philly in the Summer!

 
Old 06-27-2012, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Grant Park, Atlanta
54 posts, read 48,924 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by residinghere2007 View Post
I agree with the above. It depends on what you see as a good school. I will be honest about my opinion on what constitutes a "good school" in Atlanta ITP, APS especially. Basically it is a public school where white children attend. I don't mean that to be racially focused or anything, but for APS it is true.
YEP! I live in Grant Park and when I went to the charter, I saw very FEW "brown children" , yet at the zoned school, it was about 85% black and the kids were packed in classes like sardines!


Quote:

But on schools [sic] Once the hipsters start families, they want a decent education for their kids, especially for older Gen Ys and younger Gen Xs like myself. I was lucky in that I got my kid into a really good charter school the year it opened and my younger child is guaranteed a spot there due to having a sibling attend, but if we would not have gotten into this school, we more than likely would have moved away from GA period because I just think the standards here are lower than where I am from, even so-thought "good" schools to me are below the things I learned in an "inner city" urban school district when I was a kid.
Same here! My kids are currently at Kingfisher Academy, because the only option in Grant Park is the charter, which is based on lottery. I have two children and it's a bit pricey. While they will stay at KA next year, we are also looking at Horizon in Lake Claire. While I would LOVE to live in Lake Claire, we refuse to spend the prices they want (or spend $20K on renos, for a lower priced home) just to go to Lin.


Quote:
Personally on the whole "good school" thing here in Atlanta, I feel it is more race based versus test score based. [sic] IMO it has to do with what I started with - race and test scores. Both of which have no bearing really on how good a school actually is.
This is a touchy subject, but very important to address.

Quote:
And honestly I don't understand how Parkside, which is the school zoned to Grant Park, I believe is considered an inadequate school.
Parkside is zoned to the NW quadrant of GPark, where the homes are more expensive. It also gets a little "less brown" on that side also.
 
Old 06-27-2012, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Grant Park, Atlanta
54 posts, read 48,924 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobKovacs View Post
There's definitely no correlation between how much money is spent per pupil and the resulting outcomes. When I lived in NJ, there were certain towns that were called "Abbott Districts" as the result of a lawsuit that required all districts to receive the funding required to provide adequate education, even if the taxpayers of that city couldn't pay for it. The state kicked in huge amounts of $$ to these districts, taken from taxes paid by wealthier districts, and even spent over $8 billion building new schools in the districts. The result? Places like Jersey City, Newark, and Camden have some of the most expensive, beautiful schools in the country, have per-pupil spending that was double that of the top districts in the state, and still have the worst performing schools in the state. You can't fix some problems by throwing money at them.....

Exactly!
 
Old 06-27-2012, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Grant Park, Atlanta
54 posts, read 48,924 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by roxyrn View Post
We would have loved to be ITP nearer to GT where my husband works, but needing a decent public school for a high school student with autism brought us to Roswell.
And like you, many parents have made a similar choice--and not because they hate the city. Hence, the point of my original post.
 
Old 06-27-2012, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Grant Park, Atlanta
54 posts, read 48,924 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
You are comparing apples to oranges in certain ways.


I'm sure there are drugs in suburban Atlanta as well, but no way on earth is the access as easy.
You'd be surprised.

Currently working on a project tracking youth health risk behaviors. In my "other life" I'm a maternal/child health consultant, when i'm not online trying to figure out how the hell to live ITP, educate my kids and eat. :-)

Drug use in the suburbs is very prevalent (especially scripts and heroine). The difference is that there is no "drug dealer" standing on the corner.
 
Old 06-27-2012, 08:11 AM
 
28,311 posts, read 24,940,110 times
Reputation: 9689
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4KBH View Post
And like you, many parents have made a similar choice--and not because they hate the city. Hence, the point of my original post.
Have y'all looked in the Bolton Academy district? Lots of great intown homes in neighborhoods like Dupont Commons, Whittier Mill and Riverside priced in the $200s. The school is excellent.
 
Old 06-27-2012, 08:33 AM
 
Location: ATL by way of Los Angeles
842 posts, read 1,115,473 times
Reputation: 609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
lol, don't try to pin this off as some personal "issues" . What a cop out.
I experienced it shortly as I had cousins who grew up in South Florida with that experience and I spent summers down there. It was so much fun and refreshing to be able to walk out the door and meet the neighborhood kids or go chill at a one of his friends house, or walk to the stores with the groups of kids or barbershops or hop on one of the frequent buses to another part of town see a girl or another group of friends the hop on the bus to the mall.

They didn't have as much money or junk as I did but I can tell they had way more fun then I did sitting at home and only seeing my friends a few times a month when we got a ride. Just being kids.

I'll say the downside is wondering if your home is the "hang out house" when you're at work but you gotta trust your kids and raise em right. Can't keep a eye on them 24/7.
I still feel that these are personal "issues" on your part. The people that I know that grew up in suburbs similar to the ones that you are describing didn't just sit in the house or wait for a ride to have fun. Hell, most children knew how to make their own fun when I was growing up. That was regardless of where they grew up or how they were raised. If you sat in the house until you got a ride, that was either because you refused to go out on your own or your parents didn't let you out. Again, that is a personal issue and it does not reflect how most people that I know from low-density suburbs were raised.

Right now, we live in Gwinnett near the Walton line. The closest stores and shopping centers are not within walking distance and there is no public transportation in our area. However, I still see plenty of children out having the time of their lives either alone or with other children. I'm sure that my son will be the same way since we are not the type to force a child to stay inside or wait for us to drive them somewhere in order for them to have a good time.

When you were a child, didn't you at least have times when you rode your bike around the neighborhood? Shot some hoops somewhere? Just went out and explored the area? Your childhood was probably much better than you may think it was, but you appear to be focused on something very trivial in comparison. I know that these are different times, but most adults that I know had a lot of fun growing up unless they were abused or neglected. You never mentioned that, so I am going to assume that you also had fun even though you don't seem to think so.
 
Old 06-27-2012, 09:44 AM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,496,078 times
Reputation: 409
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big L View Post
I still feel that these are personal "issues" on your part. The people that I know that grew up in suburbs similar to the ones that you are describing didn't just sit in the house or wait for a ride to have fun. Hell, most children knew how to make their own fun when I was growing up. That was regardless of where they grew up or how they were raised. If you sat in the house until you got a ride, that was either because you refused to go out on your own or your parents didn't let you out. Again, that is a personal issue and it does not reflect how most people that I know from low-density suburbs were raised.

Right now, we live in Gwinnett near the Walton line. The closest stores and shopping centers are not within walking distance and there is no public transportation in our area. However, I still see plenty of children out having the time of their lives either alone or with other children. I'm sure that my son will be the same way since we are not the type to force a child to stay inside or wait for us to drive them somewhere in order for them to have a good time.

When you were a child, didn't you at least have times when you rode your bike around the neighborhood? Shot some hoops somewhere? Just went out and explored the area? Your childhood was probably much better than you may think it was, but you appear to be focused on something very trivial in comparison. I know that these are different times, but most adults that I know had a lot of fun growing up unless they were abused or neglected. You never mentioned that, so I am going to assume that you also had fun even though you don't seem to think so.

You are seriously not getting my point if you think I never left my house and rode my bike without a ride. I also never said I had a terrible childhood and didnt have any fun. I mean come on man. The point is there wasn't really many places to ride with a 3 mile radius except homes and since the kids were so spread out it made making friends and seeing them harder among doing other things. You really don't get it and that's cool if you never had a taste of what I'm talking about then you won't get it. Having experienced the other side I know what my area was lacking. My parents even had a simmilar experience I had when I visited cousins when they growing up in dense areas before their neighborhoods started getting dangerous after they moved out and they had to make choice of affordable , safe areas with good schools for me and my sister and could not return to those places.

Apparently other people in this thread do get it or expereinced it and even said they want their kids to have the same. So no, I am not the one with "issues" here. Also, trust me no kid is "having the time of their lives" playing alone unless the are simply introverted.They are just dealing the best way they can.

Last edited by Onthemove2014; 06-27-2012 at 10:06 AM..
 
Old 06-27-2012, 11:49 AM
 
Location: ATL by way of Los Angeles
842 posts, read 1,115,473 times
Reputation: 609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
You are seriously not getting my point if you think I never left my house and rode my bike without a ride. I also never said I had a terrible childhood and didnt have any fun. I mean come on man. The point is there wasn't really many places to ride with a 3 mile radius except homes and since the kids were so spread out it made making friends and seeing them harder among doing other things. You really don't get it and that's cool if you never had a taste of what I'm talking about then you won't get it. Having experienced the other side I know what my area was lacking. My parents even had a simmilar experience I had when I visited cousins when they growing up in dense areas before their neighborhoods started getting dangerous after they moved out and they had to make choice of affordable , safe areas with good schools for me and my sister and could not return to those places.

Apparently other people in this thread do get it or expereinced it and even said they want their kids to have the same. So no, I am not the one with "issues" here. Also, trust me no kid is "having the time of their lives" playing alone unless the are simply introverted.They are just dealing the best way they can.
Actually, you are the one that is missing the point.

Kids that didn't grow up in the city (or who grew up like you grew up) did not "miss out" on anything and should not have had any problems developing socially as you seem to suggest. A child also doesn't have to be introverted to be able to play alone.

Do you have any children? Your assessment of child rearing seems to be very warped based on this thread and some others that I have seen you in.
 
Old 06-27-2012, 12:33 PM
 
7,759 posts, read 9,642,454 times
Reputation: 5760
I wanted to address a few points here....

OTM2014, I'm wondering, why do you think a kid would have to travel over 3 miles to see a friend? Most of the time, kids have friends because of school and other local activities, so by definition they will be nearby. I kind of see it as non-issue anyway, because say you lived in Decatur and had a friend in Chamblee, and let's just pretend Atlanta had good public transit. There's no way my mother would have ever let me get on a bus to go visit a friend who lived several miles away. I don't really get why you think that kids being able to run wild and do whatever they want equals more fun. The most fun is to have lots of kids nearby, and for the most part, suburbs provide that better than cities do. I understand how it might not be fun to grow up in one of the gated McMansion communities where nobody knows each other or whatever, but a lot of non-urban areas aren't like that at all. Also, kids that grow up in rural areas seem to have perfectly fine childhoods exploring the woods, playing in rivers, and whatever they do. Everybody has to decide what experience to provide their child, but there's nothing inherently better about a high density environment. Of course, like adults, each child probably enjoys certain environments more....so maybe you are just a city boy!

As for the drugs in South Florida, I wasn't trying to say that high density causes drugs. I was just saying that everything has a certain set of tradeoffs, and down there the tradeoff is drugs. Having gone to several schools throughout my life, I never ever saw anything like the drugs in South Florida. And I lived in plenty of areas where the kids could have afforded drugs. Therefore, nobody is ever going to be able to convince me that schools in North Fulton have drug problems as bad as schools in Miami-Dade because I've lived both and seen both with my own eyes. Nothing I have ever seen can touch South Florida. It's epidemic. That might be my own personal issue, I'll admit that.

Regarding race, I wasn't aware there were any white schools in APS. At least not majority white. I'm going to go in the middle on the race issue. I want my kid to go to a school that is diverse. That means there should be some white kids there. It would be my preference that the school is at least 30% white, but a lot of that really depends on the rest of the distribution. For example, I have no problem with Duluth High School, because even though it's only 25% white, it's 25% Asian, 25% Black, and 25% Hispanic (roughly). I'd have a big problem with it only being 25% white if it was 75% Black or 75% Asian or whatever. I don't mind a white minority situation, so long as there is not some other majority. I would imagine that most races feel the same and don't want their kids going somewhere that most other kids are one other race.
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