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Old 06-30-2012, 07:01 PM
 
29,239 posts, read 26,172,404 times
Reputation: 10208

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
That is basically what I am hearing.
I know that is what you are hearing but it is not what people are saying to you.

Families who live in up and coming neighborhoods like Kirkwood and Riverside are enthusiastic about their communities and their schools. They are extremely committed and they are working hard to see that progress continues. Yet you say their schools are no good. What is it that makes them unsatisfactory in your opinion?

Everyone knows what happened in Atlanta. Yes, when large numbers of people left the city in the 1950s, 60s and 70s Atlanta became a black mecca of sorts. But it was a mecca with high rates of crime and violence, where large sections of the population lived in poverty, where the schools were failing.

Unlike some places, however, Atlanta didn't collapse. A lot of people never fled the city to begin with, and by the 1990s many new folks were coming in. Neighborhoods that had sagged began to rejuvenate and before long a major renaissance was under way.

Bear in mind, however, that the folks who got good deals in the early days in areas like East Lake, Candler Park and Poncey-Highland didn't waltz into a ready made paradise. They got favorable prices because things looked iffy. Yet they were willing to put themselves on the line and to do the hard work to make their communities safe and their schools first class. Things might not have worked out for them, and many of their friends said, "Are you crazy? Why don't you just move to the suburbs?"

But they persevered and they did succeed. Before long the old neighborhoods were looking better than ever. Families regained confidence in the public schools -- even if meant going out on a limb to do that. And things continue to look up.

When that happens, of course, these areas become highly desirable and prices go up. So if you want the ready-made success, where the hard work and risk-taking have already been done by others, then you will have to pay a premium price. You don't get all that for nothing.

If you want to do the same thing that neighborhoods like Virginia-Highland and Oakhurst and Peachtree Hills have done, you still have that opportunity. You can join like-minded folks in Kirkwood, Riverside and any number of other areas and get some darn good prices on cool intown housing. But you will have to do the Phase II work I mentioned above. You will have to do what's necessary to turn your schools around and to make the community safe.

Assuming you've followed these up and coming communities you know that they share a tremendous amount of enthusiasm. When have you seen the sort of passion for schools that has come forth in support of Coan and Toomer? The residents have seen great things happen in other communities and they mean to have it happen in theirs. And as I commented earlier, the situation often improves very rapidly.

You simply can't have it both ways. You can't expect to pay "up and coming" prices in a neighborhood that has already taken the risks, done the hard work, and created a success story. Great neighborhoods and great schools don't just happen. They are always the result of a lot of people doing the right thing. That is true both in and outside the perimeter.
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Old 06-30-2012, 07:02 PM
 
100 posts, read 111,661 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by lastminutemom View Post
I am curious as to which cities provide non-choice (ie magnet, charter, etc) solid k-12 schools in their core cities. Again, schools have to be open enrollment, in otherwords, not lottery or other requirements.
City of Decatur.
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Old 06-30-2012, 08:18 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,532,283 times
Reputation: 409
Quote:
Originally Posted by lastminutemom View Post
I am curious as to which cities provide non-choice (ie magnet, charter, etc) solid k-12 schools in their core cities. Again, schools have to be open enrollment, in otherwords, not lottery or other requirements.
The city of Decatur.



San Jose
San Francisco
DC
Portland
Seattle
NYC
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Old 06-30-2012, 08:20 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,532,283 times
Reputation: 409
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I know that is what you are hearing but it is not what people are saying to you.

Families who live in up and coming neighborhoods like Kirkwood and Riverside are enthusiastic about their communities and their schools. They are extremely committed and they are working hard to see that progress continues. Yet you say their schools are no good. What is it that makes them unsatisfactory in your opinion?

Everyone knows what happened in Atlanta. Yes, when large numbers of people left the city in the 1950s, 60s and 70s Atlanta became a black mecca of sorts. But it was a mecca with high rates of crime and violence, where large sections of the population lived in poverty, where the schools were failing.

Unlike some places, however, Atlanta didn't collapse. A lot of people never fled the city to begin with, and by the 1990s many new folks were coming in. Neighborhoods that had sagged began to rejuvenate and before long a major renaissance was under way.

Bear in mind, however, that the folks who got good deals in the early days in areas like East Lake, Candler Park and Poncey-Highland didn't waltz into a ready made paradise. They got favorable prices because things looked iffy. Yet they were willing to put themselves on the line and to do the hard work to make their communities safe and their schools first class. Things might not have worked out for them, and many of their friends said, "Are you crazy? Why don't you just move to the suburbs?"

But they persevered and they did succeed. Before long the old neighborhoods were looking better than ever. Families regained confidence in the public schools -- even if meant going out on a limb to do that. And things continue to look up.

When that happens, of course, these areas become highly desirable and prices go up. So if you want the ready-made success, where the hard work and risk-taking have already been done by others, then you will have to pay a premium price. You don't get all that for nothing.

If you want to do the same thing that neighborhoods like Virginia-Highland and Oakhurst and Peachtree Hills have done, you still have that opportunity. You can join like-minded folks in Kirkwood, Riverside and any number of other areas and get some darn good prices on cool intown housing. But you will have to do the Phase II work I mentioned above. You will have to do what's necessary to turn your schools around and to make the community safe.

Assuming you've followed these up and coming communities you know that they share a tremendous amount of enthusiasm. When have you seen the sort of passion for schools that has come forth in support of Coan and Toomer? The residents have seen great things happen in other communities and they mean to have it happen in theirs. And as I commented earlier, the situation often improves very rapidly.

You simply can't have it both ways. You can't expect to pay "up and coming" prices in a neighborhood that has already taken the risks, done the hard work, and created a success story. Great neighborhoods and great schools don't just happen. They are always the result of a lot of people doing the right thing. That is true both in and outside the perimeter.
I can have all of that at a low price in burbs. That's why people have to move out there for good public schools.
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Old 06-30-2012, 08:39 PM
 
29,239 posts, read 26,172,404 times
Reputation: 10208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
I can have all of that at a low price in burbs. That's why people have to move out there for good public schools.
That's what some people choose to do. Obviously many have chosen otherwise.

It's simply a personal choice.
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Old 06-30-2012, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
668 posts, read 812,637 times
Reputation: 595
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Families who live in up and coming neighborhoods like Kirkwood and Riverside are enthusiastic about their communities and their schools. They are extremely committed and they are working hard to see that progress continues. Yet you say their schools are no good. What is it that makes them unsatisfactory in your opinion?
Ranking in the bottom 5% in the state in test scores. High drop out rates. Majority at risk student populations. All those just for starters. I agree these areas are up and coming, but let's not pretend they've already turned the corner. They have a long way to go and success isn't guaranteed. To call someone out because they might not be willing to take that gamble with their kids is bs.
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Old 06-30-2012, 10:42 PM
 
13,452 posts, read 21,925,769 times
Reputation: 4487
arjay--

Your posts are spot on. There are unspoken reasons why some of these posters "look down" on certain schools.
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Old 06-30-2012, 11:51 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,532,283 times
Reputation: 409
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
That's what some people choose to do. Obviously many have chosen otherwise.

It's simply a personal choice.
A personal choice that they shouldn't have to make. I don't get why you think the status quo is acceptable.
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Old 06-30-2012, 11:52 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,532,283 times
Reputation: 409
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
arjay--

Your posts are spot on. There are unspoken reasons why some of these posters "look down" on certain schools.
Like low test scores. That is no secret.
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Old 06-30-2012, 11:59 PM
 
13,452 posts, read 21,925,769 times
Reputation: 4487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
Like low test scores. That is no secret.
Nope. That's not really it. You may try again.
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