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Old 07-10-2012, 09:28 PM
 
12,989 posts, read 21,140,052 times
Reputation: 4142

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobKovacs View Post
No, you don't have to pay to go to a charter school. They get their money from the state and from property taxes. The state pays $XX per student to school district, which gets re-allocated to the charter school, and the schools portion of the city/county property tax gets diverted to the charter school as well- if the charter school has 5% of the city/county's student population, it gets 5% of the funds.

The problem that many school districts have with charter schools is that they siphon away money from the district's operating budgets, but don't reduce the district's costs proportionately. If a charter school takes 500 students, the district technically should be able to reduce their number of teachers by say 25 (if there were 20 kids/class), but it doesn't work out so conveniently, since the charter school pulls from multiple schools in a district. If it only pulls 5 1st-graders from a particular school, that school can't reduce it's number of 1st grade teachers. The administrative expenses also don't go down proportionately, so the district ends up short-changed in the process- if there's only one superintendent of schools, the cost of having that superintendent doesn't get reduced just because 5% of the students are not in the district system anymore.

Now, don't get me wrong- charter schools are a great thing if they're providing something unique from what's already offerered in the district, such as specialized curriculum, or if the overall district is performing poorly and the charter school can provide a better education. But if they're just offering an "alternative" to what's already offered in a high-performing district, they're hurting the rest of the district. And as already mentioned by someone else, these charter school companies aren't in it "for the good of the children"- if there wasn't money to be made, why would a Florida-based company be opening schools in Georgia???
Good post, Mr. Kovacs.
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Old 07-10-2012, 10:05 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 1,495,016 times
Reputation: 409
Quote:
Originally Posted by kittyjo View Post
Thanks, Aries


Wow, you really need it explained to you why the privatization of public schools is a bad thing? There is huge a amount of private money being invested in charter schools, because there is a lot of money to be made. One of the biggest investors is the Walton Foundation (ie Walmart) not a company famed for their altruistic qualities. Even when expanded, Drew does not have to take everyone who lives in EL and Kirkwood (it can't)Toomer and Coan do. Charter schools can remove children with discipline problems much more easily than traditional schools (and guess where those kids get sent when Drew decides they are too disruptive - Toomer and Coan). Over the past few years, Drew's demographics have changed (because the surrounding neighborhoods have changed) and that was one of the main reasons the plan was initially rejected. Who are these extra seats going to be filled by?
The parents at Lin and Inman would never have turned their public schools around if they had had a high-performing charter in the neighborhood. The one thing that affects a school more than anything else is the level of parental involvement and a high % of parents who value education. Those are the kinds of parents who bother to apply to charter schools, which automatically improves their performance and leaves the traditional public schools with a lower % of parents involved in improving the school. It's not a level playing field. And it results in a fragmentation of funding as well as neighborhoods.
So why do the good parent's have to pick up the slack and suffer for the bad?
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Old 07-11-2012, 05:11 AM
 
1,552 posts, read 2,559,586 times
Reputation: 619
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
So why do the good parent's have to pick up the slack and suffer for the bad?
How is joining other parents in your community to improve your neighborhood schools (which are already on an upward trajectory) "suffering"? Is it better to abandon your neighborhood school while still living in the neighborhood based on the outcome of a lottery? Wouldn't that cause a bit of a rift in the solidarity of a rapidly improving neighborhood? Is a "me" mentality better than a "we" mentality in this case? They say it takes a village...
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Old 07-11-2012, 07:38 AM
 
100 posts, read 108,754 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onthemove2014 View Post
So why do the good parent's have to pick up the slack and suffer for the bad?
We are not talking about 'good' v. 'bad' parents. We are talking about a neighborhood banding together to improve its schools. If the neighborhood public schools are split its very hard to get the numbers to do that.

But the 'me, me, me' mentality makes me so sad. My next door neighbors don't have any kids, so why should they pay the school tax in their property taxes? Surely they should get that money back so they can go on vacation? The whole public school system would collapse but that's not their problem. I was going to help my elderly neighbor mend her fence but hell, if she's too old to mend it herself then that's tough, right?
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Old 07-11-2012, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,352 posts, read 16,373,686 times
Reputation: 4971
Quote:
Originally Posted by kittyjo View Post
We are not talking about 'good' v. 'bad' parents. We are talking about a neighborhood banding together to improve its schools. If the neighborhood public schools are split its very hard to get the numbers to do that.

But the 'me, me, me' mentality makes me so sad. My next door neighbors don't have any kids, so why should they pay the school tax in their property taxes? Surely they should get that money back so they can go on vacation? The whole public school system would collapse but that's not their problem. I was going to help my elderly neighbor mend her fence but hell, if she's too old to mend it herself then that's tough, right?
WE are all in this together. The quality of schools has a direct effect on property values. Everyone in a neighborhood should care about the quality of schools because it effects them even if they don't kids. The pictures and video of the Coan M.S. rallies should people of all ages. Some don't have kids, but understand what I just stated above.
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