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Old 07-04-2012, 02:15 AM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,986 posts, read 9,675,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atltechdude View Post
Well I agree with that, the ridiculous sprawl that is now considered Atlanta is why the TSPLOST is going to fail.
Ain't nothing sprawling in Meriwether. MSAs are deemed so by the Census Bureau on commuting patterns of the county into the metro area. I can't see that that many people form Meriwether commute into Coweta or Fayette for work. Troup County, yes, but not the others.
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:27 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA (Sandy Springs)
3,914 posts, read 2,417,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
Those are for 99 and 09... based on estimates.

The census always reevaluates the MSA boundaries a couple years after the census (so they can analyze the full data)

Here is the 2003 map for Georgia http://www2.census.gov/geo/maps/metr...sa2003c_GA.pdf

They added those counties a couple years after the 2000 census.

I've been waiting for the post 2010 revision (the first revision using data from the census)
Oh ok, well since we were comparing the 2010 MSA population, I figured those 28 counties are basically the most updated definition of it. Plus I really can't see why they would need to add more lol.
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:36 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
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Actually, St. Marks a huge number of Meriwether residents -- something like 20 percent -- commute to Fayette County for work, to either the PTC Industrial Park or the Fayette Pavilion. I did a story on this for the local paper about 8 years ago and those were the figures provided by the Fayette County Development Authority at the time. As you well know, and sad to say, there are very few jobs in Meriwether County. It is a GORGEOUS place for sure, land rich but cash poor, not unlike ... ?
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:44 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,462 posts, read 7,333,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atltechdude View Post
Oh ok, well since we were comparing the 2010 MSA population, I figured those 28 counties are basically the most updated definition of it. Plus I really can't see why they would need to add more lol.
its all good... I was just hoping you guys knew something I didn't about the new revisions being released


Somewhere they should list the 2000 totals with all 28 counties though (it will make it easier to compare)
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Old 07-04-2012, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,986 posts, read 9,675,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Actually, St. Marks a huge number of Meriwether residents -- something like 20 percent -- commute to Fayette County for work, to either the PTC Industrial Park or the Fayette Pavilion. I did a story on this for the local paper about 8 years ago and those were the figures provided by the Fayette County Development Authority at the time. As you well know, and sad to say, there are very few jobs in Meriwether County. It is a GORGEOUS place for sure, land rich but cash poor, not unlike ... ?
I guess my study sample is anecdotal. Our property is actually a Hogansville address, most of the people I know in that corner work in Hogansville or LaGrange. One of my high school buddies was a policeman in PTC but he has since moved into Coweta.

A lot of the manufacturing and agricultural based jobs that were around when I was a kid are gone. My Northwestern corner was always rural, jobs were always across county lines. Woodbury and Manchester were more of the job centers. But the tide is turning, Meriwether has built an industrial park right off the 54/100 exit of I-85, two suppliers for the Kia plant in West Point have located there.

Speaking of, I wonder if the Kia Plant in and of itself could swing the commuting patterns enough that Meriwether would leave the MSA after the next census data is analyzed?
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Old 07-04-2012, 08:54 AM
 
Location: 30080
2,135 posts, read 3,416,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
The main reason Kia decided to build its plant in West Point was the close proximity to unemployed blue collar textile mill workers right across the state line in Alabama. I agree that Georgia could and should be competitive in luring these large manufacturers, but there are downsides as well. Besides, we already have some pretty big players. Gulfstream is expanding in Savannah and the new caterpillar plant in Athens is nothing to sneeze at.

BUT THE MAIN THING TO REMEMBER IS THIS: Georgia is home to 15 Fortune 500 HQs. Alabama and South Carolina only have 1 each.
Having fortune 500 hq's doesn't really mean much when they employ 50 people. Whats the benefit of these HQ's for the state financially over the large industrial companies moving into Alabama? The industrial companies obviously bring more jobs and well, i'm pretty sure that's what the state needs right now.
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Old 07-04-2012, 09:03 AM
 
Location: 30080
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoslynHolcomb View Post
My husband's job. I don't think it's bitter, just a statement of fact from someone who has lived in both. Georgia had a tremendous opportunity and a few progresdive governors, that were leading the state in the right direction. Unfortunately the last few election cycles have not served the state well and it seems to be going backwards, or, at best, treading water. Alabama has never had a progressive governor and it blew its last best opportunity to transform the tax code that has kept that state mired in the 19th century. There was a time when Georgia did stand out from its southern brethren not so much now.

As for Huntsville being more progressive, I've said this before, just about any city with a small black population will be more progressive than a city with a large one. That's pretty much across the board in this country. Huntsville's black population is less than half that of Atlanta's. For a city its size in this region it has a large and growing Asian population. A sizable percentage of them population is employed in high paying jobs.
I actually have to agree with you. I've lived in both as well and Huntsville is definitely more progressive than Atlanta. Actually been considering moving back there myself.
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Old 07-04-2012, 09:06 AM
 
Location: 30080
2,135 posts, read 3,416,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
All of the previous points mentioned above aside, the biggest difference between the two states is that Georgia has succeeded at shaking whatever negative image the rest of the nation might have had from it being an Deep South "Dixie" state, while Alabama continues to fight those demons -- and not very well! Don't your license plates still read "Heart of Dixie"? During the Civil Rights era, blood was literally running in the streets of Alabama and making front page news around the world. But Georgia -- NOT JUST ATLANTA -- escaped with very few battle scars. This is a fact I think many Alabamans are still oblivious to.
That image hasn't gone anywhere if you live anywhere outside of Ga. Go up north and they still just consider people in GA to be Bama's. That'll never change. Let's be real here, people move to Atlanta because it's cheap to live and was painted as the land of milk and honey for many African Americans and an area plentiful for jobs. That image has changed quite a bit in the last 5 years though. I think the worst housing market in the nation right now pretty much reflects that.
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Old 07-04-2012, 09:19 AM
 
369 posts, read 535,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brownhornet View Post
That image hasn't gone anywhere if you live anywhere outside of Ga. Go up north and they still just consider people in GA to be Bama's. That'll never change. Let's be real here, people move to Atlanta because it's cheap to live and was painted as the land of milk and honey for many African Americans and an area plentiful for jobs. That image has changed quite a bit in the last 5 years though. I think the worst housing market in the nation right now pretty much reflects that.
First of all, Atlanta deosn't have the worst housing market in the country and never did. Miami, Las Vegas and Phoenix were much worst with empty half built condos.

Second, what's the primary reason one goes to any city? JOBS! According to a BLS report that is the greatest factor in moving to any area.

Why would one move to Miami besides weather and water? Why does one go to NYC even, for their great beaches and weather?

People seem to fail to realize that demographics aside Atlanta is quite the corporate juggernaut, very few other cities have this many fortune 500 companies in its metro and despite the recession NONE have left, so they'll be hiring again and possibly consolidating here. Also didn't someone post data showing that the job decline reports of Atlanta in the past couple of years was erroneous?

Last edited by readyset; 07-04-2012 at 09:33 AM..
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Old 07-04-2012, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,851 posts, read 5,459,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by red92s View Post
CAT is adding 1,000,000 SF of manufacturing capacity and well over a thousand jobs to Atlanta.
Are you speaking of the Caterpillar assembly plant being built in Athens? Yes, that will have a benefit to the Atlanta economy and Georgia in general because of Athens proximity to here but will much more help out Athens economy.

Manufacturing is looked on negatively by many here in America because of the bad experiences the Rust Belt and other areas have had with plant closures and such. But it still plays a very vital role to the economy of the United States and should. Over the past decade the percent of jobs supplied by the manufacturing sector has grown smaller and smaller in this country and that many economist believe is a bad thing for many reasons. Even a top executive at Honda once stated that he doesn't think it's healthy for Americas' GDP to be less than 16% manufacturing based and we have fallen from over 20% manufacturing well under 16 and shrinking.

The top reasons America needs to have more manufacturing to help shore up it's economy include.

1. Manufacturing is a higher value added endeavor than most other sectors which allows it to pay employees more money. Thats why manufacturing as a whole pays better than most other industries.They also spend more money on local services such as utilities and trucking and construction companies, etc.

2. Manufacturing unlike retail, real estate and some other sectors is less beholding to domestic consumer whims since it exports far more than other sectors. This means even when spending is down in the local economy because of low consumer confidence or whatever manufacturers can often still make good output because they are exporting product to other parts of the world where spending is more robust.

3. Manufactures spend more on capital than other operations which is good for other parts of the economy. When business is good manufactures spend millions on expensive equipment and building expansions. More so than other areas of the economy.

4. Exports from manufactures help America correct it's trade imbalance which raises the value of treasury notes and US bonds and lowers the deficit which makes investors happier and more confident about the over all state of things which makes the stock market and capital growth improve. Its a domino effect you don't get from other sectors.

Last edited by Galounger; 07-04-2012 at 04:34 PM..
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