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Old 07-03-2012, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,490 posts, read 29,434,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRS86 View Post
Alabama has more abstract poverty in its rural areas than Georgia. Have you ever traveled through those Alabama Black Belt Counties in western and southwestern Alabama? It makes the poorest counties in Georgia look good. Growing up in South GA, I though I had seen the face of rural poverty until I traveled through those parts of Alabama and rural Mississippi. Rural Georgia has it's cases of severe poverty, but it's not nearly on Alabama's and Mississippi's level.
I'm sorry but I live in southwest Alabama, and I don't see any more poverty here than where my sister lived in central Georgia (same goes for the FL panhandle).


I wont deny some of the "black belt" counties in the center of the state are pretty rough though.
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
444 posts, read 781,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoslynHolcomb View Post
Actually I'll traveled through and WORKED IN the rural poverty areas in BOTH states. And I still maintain there's not a stone's throw worth of difference between them. And I daresay that Huntsville is by far more progressive minded than Atlanta.
Huntsville has one of the highest average levels of education in the country. Atlanta runs the full spectrum from very educated, to having a sizable percentage of the population with a HS diploma or less. Huntsville is a different animal, period, as compared to many other cities. Even cities that are considerably larger.

Quote:
I'm sorry but I live in southwest Alabama, and I don't see any more poverty here than where my sister lived in central Georgia (same goes for the FL panhandle).
When I was thinking SW Alabama, I was speaking more of counties like Choctaw, Marengo, and Wilcox. At the end of the day, I guess they would be considered more West-Central Alabama. I wasn't referring to Mobile or the surrounding areas.
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,095 posts, read 15,906,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRS86 View Post
Alabama has more abstract poverty in its rural areas than Georgia. Have you ever traveled through those Alabama Black Belt Counties in western and southwestern Alabama? It makes the poorest counties in Georgia look good. Growing up in South GA, I though I had seen the face of rural poverty until I traveled through those parts of Alabama and rural Mississippi. Rural Georgia has it's cases of severe poverty, but it's not nearly on Alabama's and Mississippi's level.
Any poverty is bad anywhere, and Georgia (like everyplace else) certainly has too much of it ourselves, but the difference between the haves and have nots in Alabama was some of the most shocking I've ever seen anywhere. And I'm not just talking about black poverty, but white rural poverty as well. What truly amazed me about rural Alabama (besides how beautiful it is) is how SEGREGATED it remains. One rural county would be nearly all black, and the next one over all white. The most sparsley populated counties (and Alabama has huge counties) have dozens of tiny little towns, each with a K-12 school. One school would be all white, the next one 10 miles down the road all black. Even fairly progressive Lee County, where Auburn University is located, has all these tiny little rural high schools -- either all white or all black. It was bizarre.

Best example of this I can give of this: Just 20 miles from affluent and fast-growing Auburn is the incredibly historic town of Tuskegee -- home to Tuskegee University, the Tuskegee Airmen, George Washington Carver, Booker T. Washington. Practically the whole town of 10,000 people is considered a national historic landmark. And yet, it's literally a rural ghetto -- crumbling streets, falling down houses, 95 percent black and 50 percent living in poverty. Not only are there no jobs, there are few stores. It's like a place that time forgot. I had to go there for my job one day, and when I retuned to the office and expressed my shock and dismay at what a sad place this was that I learned so much about in history class, my coworkers just shrugged. Most had never even been there. They didn't give a damn, and they said so.


We have the same thing here in Georgia, particularly in the Southwest part of the state below Colbumbus, around Albany and all the way to Florida. Admittedly, that part of Georgia is MOST like Alabama (and Mississippi). That's our segment of the "Black Belt." But I don't think anything in Georgia matches the sad poverty I saw in Alabama.
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:42 PM
 
369 posts, read 532,902 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoslynHolcomb View Post
Lotteries are regressive because the poor bear a disproportionate share of the tax burden. Even worse, they stand to lose more and gain less of the benefit. After all, who's more likely to gain entry to Georgia Tech on the Hope scholarship; the kid whose parents work slinging hash at Waffle House down in Clayton County, or the one whose parents are corporate executives out in East Cobb?
That can't be all can it?
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
444 posts, read 781,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Any poverty is bad anywhere, and Georgia (like everyplace else) certainly has too much of it ourselves, but the difference between the haves and have nots in Alabama was some of the most shocking I've ever seen anywhere. And I'm not just talking about black poverty, but white rural poverty as well. What truly amazed me about rural Alabama (besides how beautiful it is) is how SEGREGATED it remains. One rural county would be nearly all black, and the next one over all white. The most sparsley populated counties (and Alabama has huge counties) have dozens of tiny little towns, each with a K-12 school. One school would be all white, the next one 10 miles down the road all black. Even fairly progressive Lee County, where Auburn University is located, has all these tiny little rural high schools -- either all white or all black. It was bizarre.

Best example of this I can give of this: Just 20 miles from affluent and fast-growing Auburn is the incredibly historic town of Tuskegee -- home to Tuskegee University, the Tuskegee Airmen, George Washington Carver, Booker T. Washington. Practically the whole town of 10,000 people is considered a national historic landmark. And yet, it's literally a rural ghetto -- crumbling streets, falling down houses, 95 percent black and 50 percent living in poverty. Not only are there no jobs, there are few stores. It's like a place that time forgot. I had to go there for my job one day, and when I retuned to the office and expressed my shock and dismay at what a sad place this was that I learned so much about in history class, my coworkers just shrugged. Most had never even been there. They didn't give a damn, and they said so.


We have the same thing here in Georgia, particularly in the Southwest part of the state below Colbumbus, around Albany and all the way to Florida. Admittedly, that part of Georgia is MOST like Alabama (and Mississippi). That's our segment of the "Black Belt." But I don't think anything in Georgia matches the sad poverty I saw in Alabama.
I attended TU back in the early 80's. Unfortunately, everything that you have stated about the City of Tuskegee is true. It's a lot worse now than it was back in the 80's. The fact that Tuskegee is as bad off as it is, considering that it has so many more things going for it than the typical Black Belt town rankles me and my classmates. I mean, you have an world renowned university, an interstate highway, plus a major rail line in the area, and it's still bad off. We have been devising some plans to invest in businesses to provide jobs. The City of Tuskegee is similar to a lot of areas that thrived during the Jim Crow era, but fell on hard times, once other areas opened up to the middle and upper class African American population

There is a very high level of segregation down in the Black Belt of Alabama. Most all of those cities in that region are at least 70% or more African American.
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA (Dunwoody)
2,047 posts, read 3,874,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by readyset View Post
That can't be all can it?
I'm sorry, I don't understand the question.
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA (Dunwoody)
2,047 posts, read 3,874,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRS86 View Post
Huntsville has one of the highest average levels of education in the country. Atlanta runs the full spectrum from very educated, to having a sizable percentage of the population with a HS diploma or less. Huntsville is a different animal, period, as compared to many other cities. Even cities that are considerably larger.
Yeah, amd I miss it terribly.
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
444 posts, read 781,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoslynHolcomb View Post
Yeah, amd I miss it terribly.
Had I majored in Engineering instead of Accounting, I could have gone to Huntsville out of college.

At the end of the day, I don't regret my time spent here in the ATL.
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Old 07-03-2012, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,458 posts, read 7,255,582 times
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Old 07-03-2012, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,095 posts, read 15,906,284 times
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Roslyn, what's keeping you from moving back to Huntsville? If it's as wonderful as you say and has so many opportunities I mean? Just asking ... Seriously curious. I agree it's got a lot to offer by Alabama standards, but saying it is more progressive than Metro Atlanta sounds kinda bitter.
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