U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-06-2012, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,209 posts, read 16,231,134 times
Reputation: 4923

Advertisements

Quote:
Tunnels often frighten people, because they create dark, confined spaces, but in this case I think it might work.
I love walking thru Krog Street tunnel. It doesn't get darker than that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-06-2012, 01:15 PM
 
28,183 posts, read 24,739,302 times
Reputation: 9560
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Make a deal on new ground floor retail at the corner or another prime spot. That building has to expensive to maintain, make a deal for new infrastructure in a new mixed-use development.
A deal like that could be one of the most expensive aspects of the entire project. I seriously doubt there's any debt on thee proprieties after 60 years of ownership and the maintenance costs are probably negligible. So there's not a lot of motivation to sell.

If it were me and I didn't need the cash, I'd sit tight and watch the value go up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2012, 01:12 PM
 
7,113 posts, read 8,132,877 times
Reputation: 1777
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Easier said than done, though. Both of them have been there for 60 years, knowing that the land would someday be extremely valuable. It's not likely the owners would be enticed to sell for anything less than a premium price.
Didn't the Supreme Court recently rule that private property could be seized to sell to another private party if it increases property taxes? Horrible decision by the Court in my opinion.

I want the Zesto's to stay as is. Sort of a throw back to the 1960s.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2012, 01:16 PM
 
7,113 posts, read 8,132,877 times
Reputation: 1777
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Mathman, I know you love to play the contrarian
I am not!

To me, Lindbergh is mostly strip mall. I see no harm in a classic Walmart. Lindbergh is more suburban than urban.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2012, 11:47 AM
 
28,183 posts, read 24,739,302 times
Reputation: 9560
I can't understand why the city would approve this. The land has been set aside for TOD, plus it's adjacent to the Beltline.

How does a big box store with a huge surface parking lot fit in with that?



Looks like the opponents have a website: Save Lindbergh
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2012, 12:26 PM
 
6,612 posts, read 6,563,074 times
Reputation: 4046
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I can't understand why the city would approve this. The land has been set aside for TOD, plus it's adjacent to the Beltline.

How does a big box store with a huge surface parking lot fit in with that?



Looks like the opponents have a website: Save Lindbergh
...and a petition: Petition | Walmart: Don't build a 150,000 square foot superstore across from Lindbergh MARTA | Change.org
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2012, 01:02 PM
 
9,596 posts, read 10,948,351 times
Reputation: 2139
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I can't understand why the city would approve this. The land has been set aside for TOD, plus it's adjacent to the Beltline.

How does a big box store with a huge surface parking lot fit in with that?



Looks like the opponents have a website: Save Lindbergh
Why doesn't Walmart build their store here with apartments above? Seems like this would be the perfect site for that since it's right next to a Marta stop. They are already building a Walmart with apartments above it in DC and that model should be used for all urban area's in my opinion. Walmart needs to learn how to add to the urban environment instead of taking from it. I thought they had learned that considering what they are building in DC and their proposals for NYC and Boston. Im glad the neighborhood is fighting it, seems like there may still be time to switch it to an urban format. Here is one of their urban Walmarts with apartments above it:

NoMa Walmart Residences to Deliver in Late-2013

and here is another one:
http://forttottennews.com/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2012, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,463 posts, read 4,121,817 times
Reputation: 2162
What's probably needed here is a Super-PAC(political action committee).

Because it is nakedly obvious that whoever is in charge of NPU-B or whoever is the city councilman for this area is not listening to the residents. Folks need to realize that y'all can't just vote and then forget for the next couple years until the next election.

You gotta stay on your elected officials; constantly.

You have to be just as willing to attend a city council meeting as you are to hang with your friends on a Friday night at the Tongue & Groove. Because it's pretty obvious that Wal-Mart has the ears of your local elected officials. And that won't change unless the anti-Wal-Mart folks who reside in Lindbergh come together and "Super-PAC" your local city councilman out of office and put someone in who actually gives a crap about your needs.

Just my humble two pennies on the whole issue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2012, 02:38 PM
 
28,183 posts, read 24,739,302 times
Reputation: 9560
Wow, and a 6.7 acre surface parking lot! How can that be compatible with the Beltline or any other sort of TOD?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2012, 03:17 PM
 
7,713 posts, read 9,569,702 times
Reputation: 5691
Acidsnake is exactly right.

Based on what I'm reading, current zoning laws do not allow this development. The developer is trying to change the zoning laws. So concerned residents do not have to have their government take any action at all, all they have to do is prevent them from taking action. What's the point of even making zoning laws if they can be changed any time?

When I bought my house 3 years ago, one of the things I found out was that the community had gotten together and prevented a Wal-Mart from opening up. That made me think highly of the area, anywhere with enough community involvement to take on Wal-Mart has to be good. However, when I read further, I found out what actually happened was that the community was not able to take on Wal-Mart. They tried for months, but ultimately failed. Wal-Mart won and was coming.

So the community went into "if they're going to build it, it's at least going to be nice" mode, so they pressured the government and refused to allow exceptions to architectural standards. The Wal-Mart would have had to have 3 sides of brick or stone, and a bunch of other things that would have been quite expensive for Wal-Mart to do. In the end, Wal-Mart voluntarily pulled out of the project because they didn't want to construct a high-end store, and to this day there is no Wal-Mart there.

My point is this: You can't just say Wal-Mart should do this, why can't they do that? Well, they CAN do whatever they want, but they will never do more than what is required of them by local governments. I'm pretty sure that Wal-Mart never voluntarily built apartments in their buildings or constructed underground parking decks. They did so because areas where they really wanted to go required it. Thus, anybody who petitions Wal-Mart directly to upgrade their store is completely wasting their time. What you have to do is pressure the government and zoning boards to require it. If Wal-Mart wants in badly enough, they will do what is required. If they determine it isn't worth the effort, they will just give up and not build.

So these people need to keep on the zoning board. They also need to take a look at reality. It's one thing to say "we want high density housing!" but when the rubber meets the road, you have to have people who are willing to pay the price to live in that housing as well as people who want to be in the neighborhood. You can't just build it and they will come, you have to make sure the demand is there. If you build it, they will definitely come, but you want to make sure prices don't have to bottom out and everybody loses money before they are willing to come.

The big question is, is the land valuable enough and do the residents care enough to try to bully Wal-Mart? If so, the proper avenue is through the zoning board, or whoever has the authority to change the rules. This will be a test of how powerful the community as and how much the people care. One problem with having a lot of apartments is renters rarely, if ever, care enough to go to bat for their communities. I guess we will see if the homeowners are powerful enough.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top