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Old 10-08-2012, 12:19 AM
 
3,208 posts, read 4,512,731 times
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Actually there are two separate lines in (one for each Class I carrier). Savannah's rail access is actually considered a positive attribute--Charleston's pales in comparison. And the number of tracks leading in and out isn't a huge consideration. A single track can handle, say, 20 trains a day easily, which would amount to about 5,000 truckloads. The port handles ~3,000,000 twenty foot equivalent units per year, which is probably 6,000 truckloads per day. In other words, one track has roughly enough capacity to handle all of Savannah's traffic.

The real bottleneck is arrival/departure tracks, staging areas, unloading areas, and the like. A BIG rail facility might do three trains a day in reality.

Still, truck traffic is definitely atrocious around big ports. Trains aren't optimal for the majority of movements. The state is doing a huge road project that will help greatly on this front--direct access to 95.
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Old 10-08-2012, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,851 posts, read 5,434,238 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by testa50 View Post
Actually there are two separate lines in (one for each Class I carrier). Savannah's rail access is actually considered a positive attribute--Charleston's pales in comparison. And the number of tracks leading in and out isn't a huge consideration. A single track can handle, say, 20 trains a day easily, which would amount to about 5,000 truckloads. The port handles ~3,000,000 twenty foot equivalent units per year, which is probably 6,000 truckloads per day. In other words, one track has roughly enough capacity to handle all of Savannah's traffic.

The real bottleneck is arrival/departure tracks, staging areas, unloading areas, and the like. A BIG rail facility might do three trains a day in reality.

Still, truck traffic is definitely atrocious around big ports. Trains aren't optimal for the majority of movements. The state is doing a huge road project that will help greatly on this front--direct access to 95.
Another problem is that the Savannah river for that stretch past the ports is not really that deep as sea ports go. Ships often spend hours waiting for the tide so that they can dock to load and unload and the new generation of larger ships to accommodate the the expanded Panama canal require even deeper water. That is why it is important for all of Georgia that we take advantage of federal monies being offered in the future for port deepening but there are some major political obstacles that have been thrown in the way. Clamoring for the future, Savannah has to first deal with the wreck of the CSS Georgia - CSMonitor.com

Savannah/Brunswick are truly Atlanta's as well as the rest of Georgia's ports. I think if not for them it's questionable whether IKEA, Home Depot, and a lot of other companies would have major operations in Atlanta. So the two really should (and have) work together and help promote each other's interest.
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Old 10-08-2012, 02:18 PM
 
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Yes, certainly the dredging project is critical. No doubt about that.

One misconception is that Savannah will fall apart if we can't get it dredged. It isn't really true. We just won't grow as fast.

The Panama Canal's expansion won't only allow for bigger ships; it'll allow for MORE ships to go through. More ships of all sizes. So no matter what, Savannah, Charleston, and everybody else on the east coast will see a bump. They're actually quite worried about this in LA right now: right now much of our containerized traffic gets offloaded in LA and shipped by train across the country. Together, LA and Long Beach handle 4x more cargo than Savannah. If Savannah can poach just a fraction of that following the canal expansion, it will post some pretty stellar results. And this is independent of the dredging project.

I really wish Georgia and South Carolina could reach a grand bargain with regard to the dredging. This isn't a zero sum game; there's plenty of cargo for everyone.
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Old 10-08-2012, 03:48 PM
 
28,150 posts, read 24,696,070 times
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Originally Posted by MathmanMathman View Post
You'd be surprised what the Army Corps of Engineers can do.
It was pretty cool when they accidentally dried up Bull Sluice Lake.


Corps snafu dries up lake, unsettles environmentalists | www.ajc.com
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Old 10-08-2012, 03:57 PM
 
188 posts, read 237,724 times
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This was pretty much the theme behind an entire Futurama episode parodying Atlanta:

http://www.hwdyk.com/q/images/futurama_s02e12_11.jpg

"Atlanta was a city on the planet Earth that was once landlocked. However, in an effort to boost tourism and become an even bigger Delta hub, it was moved offshore. The city then subsequently overdeveloped causing itself to sink to the ocean bottom and its inhabitants evolved into mer-people more quickly than usual since the caffeine from the Coca-Cola botteling plant helped speed things up."

http://futurama.wikia.com/wiki/Atlanta
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:34 PM
 
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Ah yes, Matt Groening is one of Atlanta's most famed detractors.
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:44 PM
 
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All the cool kids love to make fun of Atlanta. Too bad they don't have an anti-bullying law for cities, but you get used to it.
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:47 PM
 
7,113 posts, read 8,126,575 times
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Originally Posted by testa50 View Post
Ah yes, Matt Groening is one of Atlanta's most famed detractors.
What gets me is that's not even an Atlanta accent.
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:59 PM
 
7,113 posts, read 8,126,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by testa50 View Post
The Panama Canal's expansion won't only allow for bigger ships; it'll allow for MORE ships to go through. More ships of all sizes. So no matter what, Savannah, Charleston, and everybody else on the east coast will see a bump. They're actually quite worried about this in LA right now: right now much of our containerized traffic gets offloaded in LA and shipped by train across the country. Together, LA and Long Beach handle 4x more cargo than Savannah. If Savannah can poach just a fraction of that following the canal expansion, it will post some pretty stellar results. And this is independent of the dredging project.
I just wonder what is the most optimal way to transport? Get the container ship as close to its destination as possible...i.e. along the East Coast. Or dock and offload to trains as quick as you can...i.e. the West Coast. Is East Coast docking to move goods ultimately cheaper but West Coast gets your goods there faster? Or is more stuff available to carry back in your hold if you dock on the East Coast...i.e. ships hate to travel back empty or almost empty.
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Old 10-08-2012, 05:08 PM
 
28,150 posts, read 24,696,070 times
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Originally Posted by MathmanMathman View Post
Or is more stuff available to carry back in your hold if you dock on the East Coast...i.e. ships hate to travel back empty or almost empty.
We should load them up with the lazy bums in this country. Maybe the Chinese can get some work out of them.
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