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Old 10-19-2012, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,463 posts, read 4,124,289 times
Reputation: 2167

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I grew up at the conclusion of white flight in South Dekalb. The few white childhood friends that I had pretty much split by the 3rd grade. From then on it was James Crow Jr. time...

It certainly would've been nice for me to have known what it would've been like to actually grow up truly knowing & having a casual friendship with white people, instead of the superficial & often pretentious relationships I have with them today.

Despite the multiracial experience I've had in college, it's really hard to genuinely deal with diverse people as a grown up when you haven't had the opportunity to learn about & be used to the quirks, tics, cultural habits, and desires of said people as a child.

At a certain point in the childhood-to-adult process, we human beings will inevitably develop many presumptions & numerous bias filters that in many cases, can often be insurmountable.

I personally think that for those reasons is why black people & white people are at many times worlds apart, when it comes to figuring out what type of government is necessary for survival & thriving. It's probably why there will always be acrimony when it comes to the city-hood process in Georgia, especially in metro Atlanta.

There is just too much bad history in Georgia, and there yet to be a true reckoning from this sordid history.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
They was scared of black people moving into their neighborhoods.

Last edited by AcidSnake; 10-19-2012 at 05:27 PM..
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Old 10-19-2012, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,165 posts, read 16,001,395 times
Reputation: 9182
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoslynHolcomb View Post
I can't speak in terms of south Alabama. I am familiar with Auburn High and Smith's Station. They're both powerhouses. I'm betting though that lee county is an outlier. It is a sizable county though with over 616 square miles. And I don't know about Lee county, but I can't think of any school system in Alabama that provides transportation aside for special circumstances. So say, they consolidate and send all those kids to Smith's Station. how would they get there? Would the savings offset increased transportation costs?

Gadsden is another outlier. At one point it had the population to sustain three high schools. Emma Sansom and Gadsden High had close to a thousand students each, and this was in the 70s before big schools were the norm. Litchfield was considerably smaller, but you have to keep in mind that Gadsden has a river splitting it in half. East Gadsden was pretty much a city into itself and needed its own school. Especially given that the city didn't provide transportation. When the Goodyear and the steel plant tanked in the 80s Gadsden lost roughly half its population. Birmingham was the only city in the state hit harder. So yes, at that point consolidation made sense, but not when Gadsden still had a decent economy.
Lee County has school buses -- very crappy school buses. I covered multiple wrecks involving their drivers, including one that sent 20+ kids to the hospital.

Again, a huge difference in the culture of Alabama vs. Georgia. In this stay, local boards of education are required BY LAW to provide bus service to ALL STUDENTS who live beyond 1.5 miles of a school. Because it is mandated, the state foots most of the bill for buses, drivers and fuel.
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Old 10-19-2012, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,926 posts, read 9,626,329 times
Reputation: 5357
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Pretty dumb, if you ask me. Did they not remember what had happened when people in areas like East Atlanta and Kirkwood bolted 10 years earlier?

To me it doesn't look like anyone has gained much by all that chaos. The areas that fared best are the ones where folks simply stayed put, like Virginia Highland, Ansley and Buckhead.

The reason those neighborhoods stayed put? Economics. Incomes that could stay put because they weren't bound to the local schools and could go private.

We have come a long way in my lifetime. I remember the day when one AA moving on a street meant "there goes the neighborhood," one AA in a school meant "there goes the school." There are a variety of skin colors in every corner of the metro area now and we have moved past that deep rooted racist mindset. But how far?

There remains a mindset, especially among caucasians, where it is very, very difficult to be in the minority, especially when it concerns their kids and their schooling. Is it right? Is it fair? Probably not, but it is what it is. I myself would not live in a neighborhood where my kids were a small minority. My kids go to a school here in TX in the golden suburban county of Collin. McKinney, being the historic county seat does have a lot of older, poorer neighborhoods despite huge upper middle class suburban growth in the past few decades. My kids go to schools that are still predominantly white but have a far higher concentration of minorities than surrounding suburbs lilke Allen, Plano and Frisco. I see comments deriding the McKinney schools on the Dallas forum and I know it comes from folks that don't like the fact that there is a higher concentration of Hispanics and Blacks in McKinney.

At what point is it a tipping point where whites will flee because of the racial mix of their local schools? I remember a news report in the 90s showing Redan High School's yearbook, how it had gone from 90% white to 90% black in a span of only four or five years.

At some point this will have to ease up, are whites going to move further and further out to remain in a majority white district? I don't have an answer, just looking at the reality of where demographic statistics meet the real time daily grind of where people live and why. As much as I am open and non-judgmental toward any person regardless of their skin color, I have to be honest and say I wouldn't send by kids to a school where their race would be out numbered, 3 to 1, 4 to 1, 5 to 1, etc, etc. Is this racism against sheer numbers vs. the individual?

I hope those of you who have read my posts for the past 5 years of visiting this site will take into account what I have posted before and not sling any mud. I offer all this up because I think it plays into the OP. The northern parts of DeKalb are incorporating for various reasons, but underneath it, one has to be honest and say that these neighborhoods are looking at what is happening in the county as a whole and want to maintain areas that do not become overwhelmingly minority. Am I wrong? Willing to be shown that I am off base on any of this if it can be done so in a constructive manner.
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Old 10-19-2012, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,926 posts, read 9,626,329 times
Reputation: 5357
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcidSnake View Post
I grew up at the conclusion of white flight in South Dekalb. The few white childhood friends that I had pretty much split by the 3rd grade. From then on it was James Crow Jr. time...

It certainly would've been nice for me to have known what it would've been like to actually grow up truly knowing & having a casual friendship with white people, instead of the superficial & often pretentious relationships I have with them today.

Despite the multiracial experience I've had in college, it's really hard to genuinely deal with diverse people as a grown up when you haven't had the opportunity to learn about & be used to the quirks, tics, cultural habits, and desires of said people as a child.

At a certain point in the childhood-to-adult process, we human beings will inevitably develop many presumptions & numerous bias filters that in many cases, can often be insurmountable.

I personally think that for those reasons is why black people & white people are at many times worlds apart, when it comes to figuring out what type of government is necessary for survival & thriving. It's probably why there will always be acrimony when it comes to the city-hood process in Georgia, especially in metro Atlanta.

There is just too much bad history in Georgia, and there yet to be a true reckoning from this sordid history.
Posted my last one before I read this. This is why I am glad I grew up in small town Georgia. After integration, us black and white kids had to co-exist and we did so remarkably well considering. Hogansville, GA in 1970, the year of complete integration across Georgia, was a small mill town with no white-flight academy. A handful of the upper crust did send their kids to private school in LaGrange, but the vast majority of us stayed in the local schools. Was it a seamless transition? Minor skirmishes here and there, but from my fourth grade viepoint (ath the time) we did alright. We weren't a suburban area where uprooting to the other side of town was an option. I did grow up appreciating the black culture of the time and I am sure the black students I went to school with got what you are saying here was not offered to you.

Maybe its time to get back to smaller towns.
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Old 10-19-2012, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA (Dunwoody)
2,047 posts, read 3,882,734 times
Reputation: 957
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Lee County has school buses -- very crappy school buses. I covered multiple wrecks involving their drivers, including one that sent 20+ kids to the hospital.

Again, a huge difference in the culture of Alabama vs. Georgia. In this stay, local boards of education are required BY LAW to provide bus service to ALL STUDENTS who live beyond 1.5 miles of a school. Because it is mandated, the state foots most of the bill for buses, drivers and fuel.
Well Constitutionally Alabama is not even required to provide an education. Those type things linger when you have a 300k word constitution.
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Old 10-21-2012, 11:49 AM
 
28,183 posts, read 24,769,791 times
Reputation: 9570
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcidSnake View Post
I grew up at the conclusion of white flight in South Dekalb. The few white childhood friends that I had pretty much split by the 3rd grade. From then on it was James Crow Jr. time...

It certainly would've been nice for me to have known what it would've been like to actually grow up truly knowing & having a casual friendship with white people, instead of the superficial & often pretentious relationships I have with them today.

Despite the multiracial experience I've had in college, it's really hard to genuinely deal with diverse people as a grown up when you haven't had the opportunity to learn about & be used to the quirks, tics, cultural habits, and desires of said people as a child.

At a certain point in the childhood-to-adult process, we human beings will inevitably develop many presumptions & numerous bias filters that in many cases, can often be insurmountable.

I personally think that for those reasons is why black people & white people are at many times worlds apart, when it comes to figuring out what type of government is necessary for survival & thriving. It's probably why there will always be acrimony when it comes to the city-hood process in Georgia, especially in metro Atlanta.

There is just too much bad history in Georgia, and there yet to be a true reckoning from this sordid history.
Good post, Acid. There is still much work to do, on all sides.
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