U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Should Atlanta..
Should Atlanta Stay They Way It Is 17 50.00%
Annex With A neighboring Surburb or City 9 26.47%
Consolidated With Fulton County 8 23.53%
Voters: 34. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-22-2012, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,851 posts, read 5,434,238 times
Reputation: 1722

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
I guess people are fine with paying 100 dollars in gas a week just to get from and to work.
It's more complicated than that. A lot of people that live away from Atlanta's core actually live there to be close to their jobs. In other words a lot of jobs locating in the Atlanta metro are locating for different reasons out in the burbs.

Can you fault someone working for living in Fayetteville when that's where their company opened it's operation? A lot of autoworkers would love to continue living closer in in the Atlanta metro but the plants here have closed and the closest in they can live to enjoy the metro area and still be reasonable commute distance from the closest auto maker in Lagrange or Chattanooga is up in Barrow county or out in Newnan.

You can't force employers locating to the area to locate inside or close to the city and even if you tried they very well might tell you "guess what I'll just locate in Texas or where ever if you want to tell me what to do".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-22-2012, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek area
9,568 posts, read 8,639,816 times
Reputation: 5072
Quote:
Originally Posted by MathmanMathman View Post
I think the pressure of lowering costs would kick it pretty quick. The allure of cheaper land further out would out weigh the benefits of being closer in. Economics dictated early "dense" growth patterns. And if Atlanta was losing business and growth to other regions due to artificial boundaries, I think we'd revert to something similar to what we have now pretty quick.
Absolutely beyond a doubt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2012, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek area
9,568 posts, read 8,639,816 times
Reputation: 5072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
I guess people are fine with paying 100 dollars in gas a week just to get from and to work.
Ant - Do you live in the City of Atlanta, Fulton County? If so, are you a homeowner or a renter? A $350,000 house in Johns Creek / Duluth with the land, would likely run you close to a million in the City of Atlanta, Fulton County. Any idea what the property taxes are on that? About $20,000 a year. So do the math, even assuming gas would run $100 per week to commute (at 20 mpg and $4.00 / gal., that's 500 miles... not quite average around here I am sure), over 52 weeks that $5,200. That same house in Johns Creek / Duluth that costs a fraction of the intown equivalent, will run you $4,500 or so in property tax per year.

So, your point is what?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2012, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA (Dunwoody)
2,047 posts, read 3,877,308 times
Reputation: 957
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galounger View Post
It's more complicated than that. A lot of people that live away from Atlanta's core actually live there to be close to their jobs. In other words a lot of jobs locating in the Atlanta metro are locating for different reasons out in the burbs.
Precisely. We live in Dunwoody because my husband works in Chamblee. In town neighborhoods are far too pricey for us.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2012, 01:33 PM
 
28,150 posts, read 24,687,439 times
Reputation: 9549
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galounger View Post
It's more complicated than that. A lot of people that live away from Atlanta's core actually live there to be close to their jobs. In other words a lot of jobs locating in the Atlanta metro are locating for different reasons out in the burbs.
True. Most jobs are located outside the city limits. Even the majority of people live inside the city limits commute to work outside the city.

So it's a major mistake to assume that living close to downtown saves on commuting time or expense.

Proximity to work is not the only factor for people in deciding where to live, anyway. There a lot of things that go into the equation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2012, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Chicago
763 posts, read 676,177 times
Reputation: 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnsleyPark View Post
Ant - Do you live in the City of Atlanta, Fulton County? If so, are you a homeowner or a renter? A $350,000 house in Johns Creek / Duluth with the land, would likely run you close to a million in the City of Atlanta, Fulton County. Any idea what the property taxes are on that? About $20,000 a year. So do the math, even assuming gas would run $100 per week to commute (at 20 mpg and $4.00 / gal., that's 500 miles... not quite average around here I am sure), over 52 weeks that $5,200. That same house in Johns Creek / Duluth that costs a fraction of the intown equivalent, will run you $4,500 or so in property tax per year.

So, your point is what?
Do you know of any articles relating to why housing is so much cheaper in southern states? I'm guessing it's because the land hasn't appreciated as much as many other cities but you'd think at this point in history Atlanta's housing prices would yield higher costs per square foot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2012, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 21,916,527 times
Reputation: 3853
Quote:
Originally Posted by ARaider08 View Post
Do you know of any articles relating to why housing is so much cheaper in southern states? I'm guessing it's because the land hasn't appreciated as much as many other cities but you'd think at this point in history Atlanta's housing prices would yield higher costs per square foot.
The population was growing much faster in southern states so companies were cranking out housing at a high rate of speed? I suspect lower construction standards might also factor in, since roofs down here don't need to support a certain amount of snow per foot and insulation requirements are lower.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2012, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Chicago
763 posts, read 676,177 times
Reputation: 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcsteiner View Post
The population was growing much faster in southern states so companies were cranking out housing at a high rate of speed? I suspect lower construction standards might also factor in, since roofs down here don't need to support a certain amount of snow per foot and insulation requirements are lower.
Lol... Atlanta... Snow...
Thanks though. I'll do some research. I'd like to go into transportation policy when I actually begin a career. I'm from the south and it's a part of my heart and I HATE that I can't access Alon's as easy as I'd like to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2012, 05:09 PM
 
478 posts, read 585,020 times
Reputation: 770
Quote:
Originally Posted by ARaider08 View Post
Do you know of any articles relating to why housing is so much cheaper in southern states? I'm guessing it's because the land hasn't appreciated as much as many other cities but you'd think at this point in history Atlanta's housing prices would yield higher costs per square foot.
The reason for lower housing costs in southern states has to do with basic economics: Supply and Demand.

1. Supply: Because there have been few natural boundaries, there has been an endless supply of land for cities like Atlanta, Charlotte, Dallas and Houston to grow. By contrast, ciites on the east coast have had the Atlantic ocean and rivers which put a limit on the supply of land to build on.
2. Demand: Cities in the northeast and the west coast have higher incomes, so therefore there is greater aggregate demand which is able to pay higher prices for housing.

The best example of an area with high housing costs due to a limited supply of buildable land and a population with high incomes is the San Francisco Bay Area. The Pacific Ocean takes up about 50% of a 50 mile radius of downtown SF. Then add in the Bay itself with the adjoining river delta near Sacramento. After that, add in all of the mountain ranges - first the range between the coast and the towns of the Peninsula, then add in the range on the East Bay starting with the Castro Valley and heading south past Freemont. After that, you go further east and you see Mount Diablo (at Dublin) and further east still the range on the east side of Livermore (Altamont Pass).

So, between the Pacific, the Bay and the mountain ranges, maybe 25% of a 50 mile range of Downtown SF is buildable.

Next, consider the high incomes paid by the electronics industry in Silicon Valley and the big banks and other corporations in SF and there is a greater ability to pay higher home prices. To give an example, back in 2006, I was in that area on a business trip and read that the median house price in the city of SF was over $800,000 and the same was true for Santa Clara County (San Jose, Silicon Valley). That $800,000 house in San Jose is probably a 1950's 3 Bedroom/2 Bath that many in the south would turn their nose up at!

It is hard to see what will cause a significant increase in housing prices in the Metro Atlanta area, and the South for that matter, for several years. Unless incomes increase a lot (which I don't see), it is not very likely.

The Washington D.C. area has higher prices due to higher incomes paid by the Federal Government.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2012, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Inman Park
402 posts, read 569,230 times
Reputation: 300
Everything ITP should be the actual city of Atlanta.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top