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Old 10-22-2012, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek area
9,567 posts, read 8,639,816 times
Reputation: 5071

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
I don't care. Do you see how close they are to downtown/midtown? Most other cities have urbanity surrounding the core of the city....Atlanta will eventually become that way too...and this should be expected...you can't expect peaceful, quiet suburban living 1.5 miles away forever.

Atlanta is an anomaly for such a metro of it's size and it's beginning to catch up to reality and how major cities are actually built.

Jeez, these people act like their houses is being demolished for new projects.

And the reason high density development is being built there is BECAUSE of the people who moved there within the last 10-20 years. That's what happens when areas get gentrified...developments come along because the demographics has changed.
Nice residential developments have been what has driven, and what will continue to drive, people to live in the urban core. Killing the golden goose is short-sighted. It was only 100 years ago when Inman and Ansley Park, Brookwood Hills and other now intown neighborhoods were considered the suburbs. Now, the folks that live in those neighborhoods are the folks that, with others, contribute to the city's success. Study your history.
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Old 10-22-2012, 06:12 PM
 
6,795 posts, read 6,598,775 times
Reputation: 5411
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnsleyPark View Post
Nice residential developments have been what has driven, and what will continue to drive, people to live in the urban core. Killing the golden goose is short-sighted. It was only 100 years ago when Inman and Ansley Park, Brookwood Hills and other now intown neighborhoods were considered the suburbs. Now, the folks that live in those neighborhoods are the folks that, with others, contribute to the city's success. Study your history.
Boo hoo. Times change. Atlanta is changing. Neighborhoods change. I remember when many neighborhoods in NYC were considered the hood, now they are considered nice areas to live in and new developments occurred in those areas.

Same as Atlanta. Kirkwood, East Atlanta and many areas east of downtown were once considered hoods. Now they are gentrifying. Development comes along because the people in the area have more money and appeal to investors.
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Old 10-22-2012, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, Ga
1,863 posts, read 1,817,416 times
Reputation: 1344
People who live outside the direct urban core are often like the catholic church, about 500 years behind the times.
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Old 10-22-2012, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek area
9,567 posts, read 8,639,816 times
Reputation: 5071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Boo hoo. Times change. Atlanta is changing. Neighborhoods change. I remember when many neighborhoods in NYC were considered the hood, now they are considered nice areas to live in and new developments occurred in those areas.

Same as Atlanta. Kirkwood, East Atlanta and many areas east of downtown were once considered hoods. Now they are gentrifying. Development comes along because the people in the area have more money and appeal to investors.
Boo hoo? Inman Park is not a "hood" - a term I discern you mean pejoratively.
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Old 10-22-2012, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,458 posts, read 7,268,204 times
Reputation: 4205
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnsleyPark View Post
No, no, no. Some of these folks are the very residents who have helped to make Inman Park a great intown neighborhood. Don't "screw them". Instead, work with them, and see if their concerns can be satisfactorily addressed. Were someone to try to introduce a high density development in my neighborhood, I'd be up in arms. It's places like Inman Park - and the folks who live there - that have helped Atlanta grow and develop. To simply tell them to bugger off is neither right nor productive. Many of these folks are invested in Atlanta and shouldn't be told to screw off just because their idea of city living does not comport with others'.
I half agree with you.

Part of me also says this is close to the city. As this area changes their property values are going to continue to sky rocket being that there is no more room to add single family homes and area demand will increase.

If they want to remain in a only single family neighborhood, then they should consider moving to other areas. They will likely make money in the process.

There is too much infrastructure in the forms of parks, greenways, transit, and even roads for it to not face this type of growth.

But... I do agree we have to keep large parts of historical character and we should try to work with residents, but we also have to be realistic and work with market demand.
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Old 10-22-2012, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
668 posts, read 787,277 times
Reputation: 594
Jeez people, don't bother wasting time RTFA or anything when you can rip off a pithy unrelated post to make yourself feel better.

The lawsuit isn't about the development or the developers at all, and the residents say as much. It's about setting precedent for the process that was used to grant the variances. Give an inch now and next time someone will try to take a mile. It's absurd to make comments about NIMBYism when the neighborhood has supported the Inman Village project.
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Old 10-22-2012, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek area
9,567 posts, read 8,639,816 times
Reputation: 5071
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
I half agree with you.

Part of me also says this is close to the city. As this area changes their property values are going to continue to sky rocket being that there is no more room to add single family homes and area demand will increase.

If they want to remain in a only single family neighborhood, then they should consider moving to other areas. They will likely make money in the process.

There is too much infrastructure in the forms of parks, greenways, transit, and even roads for it to not face this type of growth.

But... I do agree we have to keep large parts of historical character and we should try to work with residents, but we also have to be realistic and work with market demand.
Can't argue with your logic. But it cannot be a policy that we change the fundamental of well established and prosperous intown neighborhoods for the sake of development. The character of our intown neighborhoods is one of the very unique features of Atlanta that sets us apart from many of the other similarly situated municipalities. Everything we do in development must be done with forethought of our future and respect for our past. I believe these are the qualities that can set us apart from other areas. Having lived here for 20 plus years, I have seen Midtown undergo a renaissance and have witnessed incredible change in our town. Though, at its core, it is the people who live within our city's boundaries that have contributed the most to its development. I'd hate, absolutely hate, to see that heritage trampled for a "progressive" dense development for density's sake.
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Old 10-22-2012, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,458 posts, read 7,268,204 times
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I hear what you're saying... but in this case when I look at the physical property....This is kind of where my thoughts lead me....

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Sandy...314.75,,0,7.93

This is the block in question.

The issue is its right next door to the houses. https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Sandy...104.4,,0,-6.01


My issue at large with Atlanta is we did build very spread out and sparsely populated for a city. It some ways it makes us unique, but as a region we have also far overgrown ourselves and we never developed some of what city's our size usually have.


What amazes me at large with the way Atlanta has grown is
-We had an anti-freeway movement
-Zoning against density
-Historical overlays against it
-fights against changing roads that would add capacity or make it better for through traffic for suburban commuters further away.
-At times some disdain for people OTP (just look at GeorgiaLakeSearch's kind posts for Johns Creek)


Basically every argument together amounts to this city not being sustainable, so largely alot of the business and population moves outside in one direction ignoring the city altogether (which many also get bitter about), but at the same same time we completely encouraged that outward development.

My thing is at large... something has to give and the demand in the future is only going to crank up, because there is something missing. I'm not really advocating for the opposite of the above list at all, but something has to give... and what should it be?

Now these issues are only going to get more common after we run out old industrial areas to build over.

Don't get me wrong... many of these neighborhoods need protection. Inman Park is definitely one of them, but in order to protect such a low-dense neighborhood where land is increasingly valuable... there won't be much of a buffer in the future. To me that is part of the cost protecting the neighborhood. Someone mentioned... give up an inch and they will take a mile. I see it as give up all the insignificant inches (blocks), so we can protect the significant miles.

But just as I will protect that neighborhood.... I can't realistically protect that area across the street that in itself is not worth saving, besides creating a buffer from apartments. I'm also less concerned about complaints of increased on the street parking, more people, whats on the border of a neighborhood, etc.. But I am concerned about the physical houses and neighborhood and the truer older business/retail hubs in the neighborhood. People will have to adjust to living in a high-demand area.

To me that is the reality of something has to give.


And believe me... If I could go back in time and have it my way... I would have tried prevented the destruction of many of the older buildings downtown, the old train stations, the Peachtree Arcade, the old Peachtree St. Mansions.

... but I would have tried to shift the demand for more modern growth onto some of the neighboring blocks right up against it, realizing the city is getting bigger.


As far as rebuilding the single-family houses themselves... I'm not too keen on the idea. I want to keep that character for all (not just those living there).

The only places I'm "curious" about destroying a neighborhood for urban progress is in 3 places:

1) I might could do without Home Park if it were replaced with a truly developed urban core area holding alot of people. That area is ideally located and could hold a lot of people with a bunch of amenities and little infrastructure cost.
2) I'm sure I'll get yelled at for this one... I would give up the north half of Peachtree Park, so East Paces could be reconnected, another bridge added create an urban, walkable neighborhood connecting lower and upper Buckhead/Lenox beyond just Peachtree Rd. https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Peach...,+Georgia&z=15
3) The same for the Buckhead Triangle. It is small and surrounded and dense neighborhoods.
In the latter 2 cases... I just don't think they are historically unique enough to outweigh the extreme pros.

Outside that... I'd rather more people be able to live around the neighborhoods, walk through them, and enjoy them.
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Old 10-22-2012, 09:28 PM
 
28,148 posts, read 24,687,439 times
Reputation: 9544
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
I'm sure I'll get yelled at for this one... I would give up the north half of Peachtree Park, so East Paces could be reconnected, another bridge added create an urban, walkable neighborhood connecting lower and upper Buckhead/Lenox beyond just Peachtree Rd.
Peachtree Park is already an urban and extremely walkable urban neighborhood. They are literally across the street from the Buckhead Village, which is rapidly urbanizing. They can walk to the park, the library, Lenox Square, Peachtree, grocery stores, movie theaters, umpteen bars, restaurants and nightclubs, doctors and dentists, hotels, you name it. They've got great bus service and are only a few minutes walk from two train stations. It's full of kids and families. Peachtree Park is one of the most desired neighborhoods in the city.

Why say it doesn't have historical interest just because it was built in the 1920s and 30s? It's about the same vintage as the Fox Theater, the William Oliver, the Rhodes-Haverty Buildings and the Crum & Forster buildings. For Atlanta that's fairly old.
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Old 10-22-2012, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek area
9,567 posts, read 8,639,816 times
Reputation: 5071
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Peachtree Park is already an urban and extremely walkable urban neighborhood. They are literally across the street from the Buckhead Village, which is rapidly urbanizing. They can walk to the park, the library, Lenox Square, Peachtree, grocery stores, movie theaters, umpteen bars, restaurants and nightclubs, doctors and dentists, hotels, you name it. They've got great bus service and are only a few minutes walk from two train stations. It's full of kids and families. Peachtree Park is one of the most desired neighborhoods in the city.

Why say it doesn't have historical interest just because it was built in the 1920s and 30s? It's about the same vintage as the Fox Theater, the William Oliver, the Rhodes-Haverty Buildings and the Crum & Forster buildings. For Atlanta that's fairly old.
Dead on spot.
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