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Old 10-26-2012, 09:17 PM
 
6,795 posts, read 6,612,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I understand, CW.

IF -- and the IF is where the problem lies -- if we could simply turn East Paces Ferry into a nice city street across GA 400 and past Lenox Square that would be one thing. And IF you could somehow manage the traffic on such a street so that it didn't become a roaring torrent through the neighborhood. And IF we could ensure that such a street would be pedestrian oriented. And IF we could confine growth so that it stayed in the zones marked for commercial development and didn't continually eat away the single family neighborhoods like it has everywhere else such roads have been constructed.

And so it goes.

There's a terrific piece in this week's Saporta Report by urban designer Mike Morgan, in which he talks about why Decatur has been so successful.
However, an ever expanding sea of asphalt has begun to tear at the fabric of urban life. Increases in congestion and asphalt have begun to damage much that has made the city attractive. The ďcity in a forestĒ has come to be seen as the city of traffic jams, pavement and heat.

A recent event opened my eyes to another view of Atlanta. A colleague from Boston was in town for meetings and commented that she wished that Bostonís public transportation system was as good as Atlantaís. I was floored by her comment. Isnít Bostonís system excellent and Atlantaís second-tier?

My colleague had flown into ATL, boarded the MARTA train to Decatur, walked from the Decatur station to a downtown Decatur hotel. She spent a pleasant evening in Decatur, and the next morning she took the train north to Doraville for meeting preparations. Around noon we took the train downtown for our meetings. She then hopped a train back to the airport and debarked for home.

As a visitor, she experienced an Atlanta that few auto-bound residents perceive. Atlantans, however, seem trapped in a belief that roadway improvements are the only way forward and that huge inputs of public funding are required to make the city more inviting. Perhaps an alternate vision is called for rather than a bigger road network.

Fortunately, we do not have go very far to find a great example the results that can be achieved through a change of direction.

Decatur is the place, and it is right next door. Decatur made a radical choice to reorient itself to the realm of the pedestrian. They went on a road diet. They narrowed Ponce De Leon Ave. to two lanes. They replaced auto capacity with shady sidewalks, on-street parking, and bike lanes. They focused a vibrant living environment right on top of their fine downtown train station.

Rather than separating residents from transit with vast expanses of asphalt, Decatur actually mandates a mix of uses Ė residential, working, and recreation all together within the compact area of downtown. They placed emphasis on livability over throughput, and the yield has been one of the most desirable urban environments in the US.

Atlanta, to date, lacks a focused commitment to an urbane lifestyle. Look at the areas surrounding most of the intown train stations. While originally envisioned as community centers, policies were never put in place to make transit development desirable.

Stations are separated from users by blasted looking parking lots, high fences, atrocious urban design, dangerous roadways and sprawling commercial districts. The stations are not friendly to pedestrians or bicyclists. Is there any wonder that few people use them?

Much of Atlanta is actively hostile to people who are not in cars. Just walk along the edges of Piedmont Park if you donít believe it.

Decatur provides model of how Atlanta can reorient its growth to people | SaportaReport
That's exactly what SPI-9 and SPI-12 are attempting to do. Let's worry less about adding throughput than enhancing the quality of life in the vibrant, thriving communities we have in the city now.


Whoever said this is a genius. This is what I've been trying to say for a long time now. They just say it i a more elegant way then I do.

I loved this statement

Quote:
Much of Atlanta is actively hostile to people who are not in cars. Just walk along the edges of Piedmont Park if you donít believe it.
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Old 10-28-2012, 02:07 AM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,918 posts, read 9,617,002 times
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CW and Arjay, have just read through the whole thread and appreciate your posts and even moreso the intelligence and tenor both of you have displayed.

I side with CW on this one I do believe. Not there on a daily basis so I am having to dig thru the memory banks on the area. One of the big differences in Peachtree Park and other historic neighborhoods mentioned is they have been able to create a cul de sac neighborhood. Isn't this why many deride the suburbs? No grid pattern, but a single entrance neighborhood with a bunch of cul de sacs?

I like CW's big picture idea. A big city park out of North Peacthree Park and a reopened E. Paces Ferry sound like a great development. Not having any stake in the neighborhood, it is easy for me to say yes, but I do like the overall connectivity argument CW proposes.
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Old 10-28-2012, 10:23 AM
 
28,181 posts, read 24,739,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
I side with CW on this one I do believe. Not there on a daily basis so I am having to dig thru the memory banks on the area. One of the big differences in Peachtree Park and other historic neighborhoods mentioned is they have been able to create a cul de sac neighborhood. Isn't this why many deride the suburbs? No grid pattern, but a single entrance neighborhood with a bunch of cul de sacs?
There are 8 entry/exit streets into Peachtree Park, which is not bad for an area that's only about 200 acres. Nearly every street connects with a major arterial (Piedmont or Peachtree).

However, they are bounded on the east by the Norfolk Southern freight line, the MARTA rail line and GA 400. There's a pedestrian bridge across 400.

A number of other intown neighborhoods are similarly situated.

The key factor is that at this point there's no demand for sacrificing a thriving little area like Peachtree Park in favor of another road. There are very large adjoining areas that have already been designated for heavy duty mixed use development. If all that gets built out over the next several generations and there is demand for more connectivity, I'm sure Peachtree Park will be redeveloped. But it would be extremely premature to do something like that now.
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Old 10-29-2012, 09:01 AM
 
27 posts, read 49,391 times
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What happened to the discussion of Inman Park? That development is gonna rip the heart out of that area.
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Old 10-29-2012, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,209 posts, read 16,231,134 times
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Quote:
What happened to the discussion of Inman Park? That development is gonna rip the heart out of that area.
The property is a cluster of non-historic 1 story buildings. At least this development will add density and match the developments around.
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Old 10-29-2012, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,458 posts, read 7,282,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isabelledaddy View Post
What happened to the discussion of Inman Park? That development is gonna rip the heart out of that area.
how so?
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Old 12-05-2012, 09:55 PM
 
28,181 posts, read 24,739,302 times
Reputation: 9560
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
There are 8 entry/exit streets into Peachtree Park, which is not bad for an area that's only about 200 acres. Nearly every street connects with a major arterial (Piedmont or Peachtree).
This is typical of the homes that would be zapped if a new road were to be pushed through Peachtree Park. It seems sort of a shame to sacrifice these old places just to allow more cars to zoom through.

What Makes Peachtree Park Special
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