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Old 10-22-2012, 01:00 PM
 
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Does anyone have information on how many students are currently out-of-zone transfers at Grady High School? Under the APS redistricting last Spring, it was said that these would be phased out.

How many students would this reduce the school by and what will it do to the school's diversity? Or is this even happening?
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Old 10-22-2012, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
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Quote:
Does anyone have information on how many students are currently out-of-zone transfers at Grady High School? Under the APS redistricting last Spring, it was said that these would be phased out.

How many students would this reduce the school by and what will it do to the school's diversity? Or is this even happening?
They will no longer accept new transfers. Current students were allowed to stay.
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Old 10-23-2012, 05:04 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
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I'd say that is a good thing.

People should be made to attend schools in their own neighborhood and fix them(or at least try to). I attended school in my own neighborhood, despite it being no up to standard, but I made the best of that situation, and came out better for it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fourthirtysix View Post
Does anyone have information on how many students are currently out-of-zone transfers at Grady High School? Under the APS redistricting last Spring, it was said that these would be phased out.

How many students would this reduce the school by and what will it do to the school's diversity? Or is this even happening?
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Old 10-23-2012, 09:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by AcidSnake View Post
I'd say that is a good thing.

People should be made to attend schools in their own neighborhood and fix them(or at least try to). I attended school in my own neighborhood, despite it being no up to standard, but I made the best of that situation, and came out better for it.
I have to agree. If people are allowed to pick and choose any school they want, that removes any incentive to improve their own local school.

It also de-incentivizes folks who live in the receiving school zone. Why knock yourself out to improve your local school if anybody else can show up say, "Great, I think I'll take advantage of this excellent situation you've created."
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Old 10-23-2012, 11:46 AM
 
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Does anyone know how many out-of-zone transfers there were at the start of this year? This should have a pretty substantial impact on reducing the number of students at Grady. Also, how will it affect the school's diversity?
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Old 10-23-2012, 12:24 PM
 
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Don't know, but actually don't agree that it is a good thing. I feel it punishes better performing students who are looking for an opportunity to better themselves. This decision is actually the main factor in my family deciding we will move out of Atlanta and to Ohio before my son gets to high school as Ohio has school choice (voucher system). Even though in many ways I like it better here than in Ohio. I think it is a way of saying people who are rich deserve a better education, or who have more dedicated parents, than a poor kid or a kid whose parents are crap but who want to better their own lot.

I don't believe in "fixing" underperforming schools. I'd rather they just close even though IMO underperforming isn't necessarily, directly tied to test scores. I know I would never send my kid to the neighborhood school where I live. The more good quality kids who leave bad schools the better IMO. That way they will either close or shape up.

Hopefully the charter my son goes to will expand into a high school, which they are considering doing. If that is the case, we will stay so my daughter can benefit from the charter school as well, a school that I will not be able to even halfway duplicate in Ohio.
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Old 10-23-2012, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
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I don't believe in "fixing" underperforming schools. I'd rather they just close even though IMO underperforming isn't necessarily, directly tied to test scores.
That's a harsh thing to say. We cannot give up on schools and just let them close. Schools are part of a neighborhood's fabric, as a school improves so does the neighborhood.
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Old 10-23-2012, 12:49 PM
 
14,375 posts, read 7,085,168 times
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Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
That's a harsh thing to say. We cannot give up on schools and just let them close. Schools are part of a neighborhood's fabric, as a school improves so does the neighborhood.
I do understand the idea behind that but I am a parent of young kids and I am not going to let lack of resources deny my kids the opportunity to attend a decent school. Like I said, I am not even all into test scores, mostly the culture and environment of the school in important to me and due to bureacracy in school administrations, this is very difficult to change and can take years. I am not going to allow my kid to fall behind or be ridiculed or bullied just because someone else thinks that "fixing" schools is good for the neighborhood. I'd rather a charter be created that has rules that will kick out disruptive students be brought into the neighborhood to compete with the poor traditional school. That is basically what happened where I live now and is why Kennedy and Herndon were closed. Most of the neighborhood middle schoolers I know go to KIPP schools (WAYS or Strive) and most of the elementary schoolers except maybe 2 that I know either go to charter schools or other, close, better performing neighborhood schools like Centennial Place (which is actually closer to most people in my neighborhood than Bethune, which is where the kids are suppose to go as we live closer to Northside Dr and it is less than a mile to Centennial).

So to me that idea is all good and dandy but right now, my kid needs to be in a good school. I care more about his education than the neighborhood right now, even though I do care about the neighborhood, my kids and their well being, which to me, education is a part of, is more important than anything to me. And I do see the denial of out of zone transfers as a way to deny many talented high schoolers the opportunity to get a better education.

But want to say I do agree that making a school better makes a neighborhood better. I went to a regular inner city school in my hometown and we were not the best school but we were decent, had great teachers, and had just as many resources as upper echelon schools in the rest of the city and many of the suburban communities. The introduction of school choice actually made the schools better that were not all that great and many schools did close, even my former high school closed, which I was sad about as I have great memories of my time there, but the school that took its place is better and they have a couple more new public charter and selective enrollment schools that took its place and give the poor kids in that neighborhood an opportunity to better themselves via education. They also have the option of transferring out of their actual district to a suburban school and even to get a voucher for private school. One of my nephews is 14 and is a sophomore (he is a year ahead as he is gifted) at one of the most prestigious all male schools in the state. I will admit my brother, his dad, was a pretty crappy dad. His mom is a pretty crappy mom, but he is smart as a whip. He has aunts and extended family who deeply care about him because he is talented and we all made it happen to get him into this school as there are small fees that his parents refused to pay, that I and other relatives pay for him. Without the option of that voucher and especially if he lived here, he would not be getting the great education that he is currently getting, one that rivals most of the schools here in Atlanta period. So I am an advocate of school choice and am more into the "right now" than what "could be" in regards to education.
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Old 10-23-2012, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 21,889,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I have to agree. If people are allowed to pick and choose any school they want, that removes any incentive to improve their own local school.
I disagree, and I can provide decades of anecdotal evidence in my own home state that suggests you might be incorrect.

Not only does the 20+ years of experience in Minnesota demonstrate that your assertion isn't inevitable, but there appear to be at least 14 or 15 states that have some form of open enrollment statewide, and as far as I know most of those states are seeing success with that approach.

Of course, Georgia (or just Atlanta) might actually provide a more challenging environment than some states because of the much higher variability in public school quality down here. This region is so socially and politically balkanized that I could see it fostering and perpetuating the attitude you describe in some cases.
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Old 10-23-2012, 03:05 PM
 
28,104 posts, read 24,632,008 times
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Originally Posted by rcsteiner View Post
I disagree, and I can provide decades of anecdotal evidence in my own home state that suggests you might be incorrect.

Not only does the 20+ years of experience in Minnesota demonstrate that your assertion isn't inevitable, but there appear to be at least 14 or 15 states that have some form of open enrollment statewide, and as far as I know most of those states are seeing success with that approach.
That's great, RC, and I am glad to hear it.

I guess the idea is that if any student can attend any school, it will tend to lift everyone up? If so, I would love to see that happen here.
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