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Old 02-03-2013, 02:38 AM
 
Location: atlanta
3,980 posts, read 4,587,471 times
Reputation: 3250

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i think we're all familiar with the problem of gentrification. a poor neighbourhood becomes hip and people move in and fix up the buildings, and prices start to go up. the neighbourhood gets safer and prices continue to go up. when prices go up, property taxes go up. this is great for people wanting to move in, but what happens is that the low-income people who lived there in the first place end up getting pushed out of their homes and they go live in another low-rent neighbourhood. so the buildings and streets are clean and safe, but many of the hardworking people who lived there don't get to see the change happen.

i think there needs to be a couple of laws or programs set up to give lower income people the opportunity to live in neighbourhoods that are safe, with good schools and responsible neighbours. that way everyone will have the same opportunities as everyone else when it comes to education, jobs, and general safety.

my first idea is to have a property tax cap. it would only apply for those who have owned (and lived in) the same house (or condo) for 10 years or more. how it would work is that during the first 10 years, they pay property taxes based on whatever the home is worth like everyone does now. however, as soon as they qualify for the tax cap, their property taxes can no longer rise any higher than the highest rate they paid in the previous 10 years, adjusted for inflation.

so, for example, ruth lives in reynoldstown, and here are her annual property taxes:

2001 — $950
2002 — $900
2003 — $900
2004 — $950
2005 — $1000
2006 — $1025
2007 — $1100
2008 — $1150
2009 — $950
2010 — $975

now, starting in year 2011, she would meet the requirement for the tax cap. that means that she is charged taxes based on whatever her property is worth in the future, but she cannot be charged more than $1150 on her taxes, adjusted for inflation. so say that reynoldstown becomes a really expensive neighbourhood. that means that her property would probably be valued higher than it had been during the ten year period from 2001-2010, but she can't be charged more than $1150 in 2008 dollars because she's lived in the house for 10 years and she's "grandfathered" in. i believe this would help out a lot of lower income individuals and allow them to stay in the neighbourhood that is their home, without significantly reducing revenue.

the second idea i have would be for all new apartment complexes— 20% of the apartments would have to be affordably priced, meaning that a working individual with a section 8 voucher would be able to afford to live there. the apartments would have to be randomly distributed throughout the building (so you can't put all the section 8 people on the third floor), with a 20% minimum for the complex. in addition, we'd have to pass a law that made it illegal to reject section 8 vouchers.

my whole point with all of this is that we have to stop quarantining people because they are poor. it didn't work in projects and created some of the worst crime atlanta has ever seen. it's not working now with neighbourhoods like english avenue and pittsburgh, because the fact is you've got about half of the people there working hard doing three jobs trying to feed their family, and they simply don't have the voice or the power to run drug dealers, gangs and pimps out of their neighbourhood, and the criminals know this, so they locate in these areas where the people can't resist them. i'm not talking about putting some drug dealer in the penthouse suite on the public dime, i'm talking about giving hard working people the fighting chance to better their lives and give their children a chance to have something better, a decent education, not having to witness people shoot up heroin or get shot on a daily basis. every child deserves that and i think we need to make it happen.
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:59 AM
 
12,975 posts, read 21,087,707 times
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Gentrification as an End Game, and the Rise of
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
858 posts, read 1,089,884 times
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Sooo... communism?
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:44 AM
 
1,584 posts, read 1,661,799 times
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Don't we already have something like that going on with the taxes? I live on almost four and a half acres in Roswell that my family bought in 67'. The taxes are only 600 bucks!
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:47 AM
 
1,584 posts, read 1,661,799 times
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If they don't do that in Atlanta proper they absolutely should.
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:15 AM
 
1,584 posts, read 1,661,799 times
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Also, while I agree that affordable housing should be available. I don't agree that all buildings should accept section 8. Section 8 housing should not come with valet parking! I will never live in luxury because I can't afford it. I live in a leaky, dingy old house and when it sells and I get my ten percent I'll spend 50k in a neighborhood like Adair Park and be happy with living there for the rest of my days. Why should we pay for working class people to live in luxury when there are vacant houses in working class neighborhoods? Working class pride has gone down the hole.
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Old 02-03-2013, 12:14 PM
 
28,204 posts, read 24,809,955 times
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There are a good many exemptions for low income and elderly folks already in effect. If you look at some of the older and/or unrenovated homes, they are paying little or no property taxes.

However, it would certainly make sense to review all that and make it a more unified and coherent system. You also want to make sure that investors aren't gaming the system.
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Old 02-03-2013, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Columbus,Georgia
2,663 posts, read 3,828,424 times
Reputation: 596
I just don't understand why so many people are so scared of section 8 tenants. The purpose of section 8 is to stop the development of projects,and to create an equal life style for everyone. No matter how much income one brings in yearly.

Last edited by Columbuskidd92; 02-03-2013 at 01:44 PM..
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Old 02-03-2013, 01:16 PM
 
28,204 posts, read 24,809,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Columbuskidd92 View Post
I just don't understand why so people many are so scared of section 8 tenants. The purpose of section 8 is to stop the development of projects,and to create an equal life style for everyone. No matter how much income one brings in yearly.
Some people apparently think that because they bring in more money than somebody else they have the right to live some private, upscale lifestyle.
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Old 02-03-2013, 01:47 PM
 
924 posts, read 1,133,739 times
Reputation: 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by Columbuskidd92 View Post
I just don't understand why so many people are so scared of section 8 tenants. The purpose of section 8 is to stop the development of projects,and to create an equal life style for everyone. No matter how much income one brings in yearly.
Because they are more likely to be less desirable neighbors? Not saying it is automatic or anything, but I guarantee it is a higher % than the overall population.

The part of your post I highlighted in bold is communism. We generally frown on that here in America. If everyone gets the same lifestyle without having to work for it then soon enough everyone would stop working.
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