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Old 02-03-2013, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
97 posts, read 117,297 times
Reputation: 94

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Sigh. Yes I should be banned/ignored for speaking my mind.

How intolerant you all are. Listen to yourselves. What happened to free speech?

As a former Atlanta resident I am thrilled to be out of there. I offered my opinion to the original poster, who is considering leaving DC, the wealthiest, most educated metro region of America, for Atlanta, the poster child of sprawl and an example that other cities should never emulate.

Thanks for making my case for me.
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Old 02-03-2013, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Inman Park
402 posts, read 569,483 times
Reputation: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by It's Bobby Again View Post

Our concerns:
Being non-AA and how that impacts daily life and career is for now the question that seems the hardest to get an answer to. I don't think a short visit to the city could answer this, I think I need to hear from multiple pov's of ATL citizens. Obviously it's a touchy subject, but would like a mature, intelligent conversation about this.
lol. Some people.
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Old 02-03-2013, 07:06 PM
 
1,584 posts, read 1,657,156 times
Reputation: 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by germansoldiers View Post
Sigh. Yes I should be banned/ignored for speaking my mind.

How intolerant you all are. Listen to yourselves. What happened to free speech?

As a former Atlanta resident I am thrilled to be out of there. I offered my opinion to the original poster, who is considering leaving DC, the wealthiest, most educated metro region of America, for Atlanta, the poster child of sprawl and an example that other cities should never emulate.

Thanks for making my case for me.
We can practice free speech too and a lot of us are sick of seeing the negativity on here every day. Every single day you waste your time and ours trolling the Atlanta forum. Get a life.
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Old 02-03-2013, 07:59 PM
 
27 posts, read 30,636 times
Reputation: 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by It's Bobby Again View Post
The bad: race relations, bad traffic/road rage, diversity, land locked and no nearby cities worth visiting, local government.
...
Also is there lots of outdoor green-space, like metro parks in the area? You know, just places to hang out in good weather.
As a former Atlantan (and former D.C. resident), here's my take.

On diversity and race relations: The City of Washington is 51% black, 38.5% white, 9% latino and 3% Asian. The City of Atlanta is 54% black, 38.4% white, 5% hispanic and 3% Asian. Suffice it to say, the cities themselves are pretty similar in terms of diversity. (I doubt there is an American city that closer to D.C. in terms of racial makeup.) Indeed, 31% of businesses in the Atlanta area are black-owned, compared to 28% of those in D.C. A larger percentage of blacks in Atlanta have college degrees than any American city, including D.C., but I doubt this is a plus or a minus for you.

As for the suburbs, Prince George's and DeKalb have some similarities-- as one poster implied. Both have a large black middle class. Both have a large black poor population. The similarities really end there though. P.G. county is 64% black, 19% white, 15% Latino and 4% Asian. Dekalb is 54% black, 35% white, 4% Asian and 10% Latino.

Cobb County, to Atlanta's west, is 54% white, 29% black, 11% Hispanic and 4% Asian. It's fair to say that Gwinnett is the most diverse county in the Atlanta area. According to Wikipedia: "44.0% non-Hispanic white, 23.6% black, 20% hispanic, 2.7% Korean, 2.6% Asian Indian, 2.0% Vietnamese, 3.3% other Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 8.8% some other race (0.3% non-Hispanic of some other race) and 3.1% from two or more races." I am unaware of any county in the metro D.C. that has that type of diversity, though I could be wrong.

Outdoors: When you visit, take a stroll on the Beltline and you'll see folks of all types enjoying art, biking, skateboarding and enjoying a beautiful (imperfect) city. In particular, because you like the outdoors, I'd start at Piedmont Park, and take the Beltline Trail to Old Fourth Ward Park and the Skate Park. If you're here for a week, take a drive up to the mountains or Lake Lanier.

On traffic: If you live in the intown neighborhoods, traffic is not a major issue. If you live in the suburbs, D.C. and Atlanta both have terrible traffic. One notable difference, of course, is that D.C. has great commuter rail. So if you insist on the suburbs, I'd consider living close to a MARTA station. This limits your options to North Fulton (i.e., Alpharetta) and a few places in DeKalb like Decatur. That of course, takes away from the point about Gwinnett's diversity. Yes it's diverse, but it doesn't have commuter rail. I'd note that Alpharetta, which is 15% Asian, does have train access.

On cities worth visiting: Fair point. Atlanta is not driving distance to world class cities like NYC or Boston. But of course, it is driving distance to small, quaint cities culture worth exploring: Nashville, Savannah, and New Orleans. And of course, the Airport will get you anywhere you want on a direct flight.

Local government: Far from perfect, but not as bad as D.C. Kasim Reed is immensely popular, far more so than Vincent Gray in D.C. Unlike Gray, Reed does not govern under threat of indictment.

Hope that helps. I happen to love D.C. and love Atlanta. Having lived both places, they are different, but not terribly different on the metrics you stated as important. (Where they differ in meaningful ways: (1) public transit/density; (2) affordability (3) political autonomy from red state). But my advice is to visit. There are people who love Atlanta and people who don't. I personally think Atlanta's strengths are its intown neighborhoods: Inman, Candler, Midtown, Virginia-Highland, Ponce-Highland, West Midtown. But even that is controversial on this board, as some people love their suburbs.

Last edited by junimar; 02-03-2013 at 08:22 PM..
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
21,010 posts, read 32,987,960 times
Reputation: 12675
Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
Don't move.
I don't understand sideswipes like this where no rationale is involved. Kindly explain, or refrain.
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:54 PM
 
12,941 posts, read 21,025,520 times
Reputation: 4091
Quote:
Originally Posted by junimar View Post
As a former Atlantan (and former D.C. resident), here's my take.

On diversity and race relations: The City of Washington is 51% black, 38.5% white, 9% latino and 3% Asian. The City of Atlanta is 54% black, 38.4% white, 5% hispanic and 3% Asian. Suffice it to say, the cities themselves are pretty similar in terms of diversity. (I doubt there is an American city that closer to D.C. in terms of racial makeup.) Indeed, 31% of businesses in the Atlanta area are black-owned, compared to 28% of those in D.C. A larger percentage of blacks in Atlanta have college degrees than any American city, including D.C., but I doubt this is a plus or a minus for you.

As for the suburbs, Prince George's and DeKalb have some similarities-- as one poster implied. Both have a large black middle class. Both have a large black poor population. The similarities really end there though. P.G. county is 64% black, 19% white, 15% Latino and 4% Asian. Dekalb is 54% black, 35% white, 4% Asian and 10% Latino.

Cobb County, to Atlanta's west, is 54% white, 29% black, 11% Hispanic and 4% Asian. It's fair to say that Gwinnett is the most diverse county in the Atlanta area. According to Wikipedia: "44.0% non-Hispanic white, 23.6% black, 20% hispanic, 2.7% Korean, 2.6% Asian Indian, 2.0% Vietnamese, 3.3% other Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 8.8% some other race (0.3% non-Hispanic of some other race) and 3.1% from two or more races." I am unaware of any county in the metro D.C. that has that type of diversity, though I could be wrong.

Outdoors: When you visit, take a stroll on the Beltline and you'll see folks of all types enjoying art, biking, skateboarding and enjoying a beautiful (imperfect) city. In particular, because you like the outdoors, I'd start at Piedmont Park, and take the Beltline Trail to Old Fourth Ward Park and the Skate Park. If you're here for a week, take a drive up to the mountains or Lake Lanier.

On traffic: If you live in the intown neighborhoods, traffic is not a major issue. If you live in the suburbs, D.C. and Atlanta both have terrible traffic. One notable difference, of course, is that D.C. has great commuter rail. So if you insist on the suburbs, I'd consider living close to a MARTA station. This limits your options to North Fulton (i.e., Alpharetta) and a few places in DeKalb like Decatur. That of course, takes away from the point about Gwinnett's diversity. Yes it's diverse, but it doesn't have commuter rail. I'd note that Alpharetta, which is 15% Asian, does have train access.

On cities worth visiting: Fair point. Atlanta is not driving distance to world class cities like NYC or Boston. But of course, it is driving distance to small, quaint cities culture worth exploring: Nashville, Savannah, and New Orleans. And of course, the Airport will get you anywhere you want on a direct flight.

Local government: Far from perfect, but not as bad as D.C. Kasim Reed is immensely popular, far more so than Vincent Gray in D.C. Unlike Gray, Reed does not govern under threat of indictment.

Hope that helps. I happen to love D.C. and love Atlanta. Having lived both places, they are different, but not terribly different on the metrics you stated as important. (Where they differ in meaningful ways: (1) public transit/density; (2) affordability (3) political autonomy from red state). But my advice is to visit. There are people who love Atlanta and people who don't. I personally think Atlanta's strengths are its intown neighborhoods: Inman, Candler, Midtown, Virginia-Highland, Ponce-Highland, West Midtown. But even that is controversial on this board, as some people love their suburbs.
Good post.
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:56 PM
 
731 posts, read 645,711 times
Reputation: 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by junimar View Post
As a former Atlantan (and former D.C. resident), here's my take.

On diversity and race relations: The City of Washington is 51% black, 38.5% white, 9% latino and 3% Asian. The City of Atlanta is 54% black, 38.4% white, 5% hispanic and 3% Asian. Suffice it to say, the cities themselves are pretty similar in terms of diversity. (I doubt there is an American city that closer to D.C. in terms of racial makeup.) Indeed, 31% of businesses in the Atlanta area are black-owned, compared to 28% of those in D.C. A larger percentage of blacks in Atlanta have college degrees than any American city, including D.C., but I doubt this is a plus or a minus for you.

As for the suburbs, Prince George's and DeKalb have some similarities-- as one poster implied. Both have a large black middle class. Both have a large black poor population. The similarities really end there though. P.G. county is 64% black, 19% white, 15% Latino and 4% Asian. Dekalb is 54% black, 35% white, 4% Asian and 10% Latino.

Cobb County, to Atlanta's west, is 54% white, 29% black, 11% Hispanic and 4% Asian. It's fair to say that Gwinnett is the most diverse county in the Atlanta area. According to Wikipedia: "44.0% non-Hispanic white, 23.6% black, 20% hispanic, 2.7% Korean, 2.6% Asian Indian, 2.0% Vietnamese, 3.3% other Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 8.8% some other race (0.3% non-Hispanic of some other race) and 3.1% from two or more races." I am unaware of any county in the metro D.C. that has that type of diversity, though I could be wrong.

Outdoors: When you visit, take a stroll on the Beltline and you'll see folks of all types enjoying art, biking, skateboarding and enjoying a beautiful (imperfect) city. In particular, because you like the outdoors, I'd start at Piedmont Park, and take the Beltline Trail to Old Fourth Ward Park and the Skate Park. If you're here for a week, take a drive up to the mountains or Lake Lanier.

On traffic: If you live in the intown neighborhoods, traffic is not a major issue. If you live in the suburbs, D.C. and Atlanta both have terrible traffic. One notable difference, of course, is that D.C. has great commuter rail. So if you insist on the suburbs, I'd consider living close to a MARTA station. This limits your options to North Fulton (i.e., Alpharetta) and a few places in DeKalb like Decatur. That of course, takes away from the point about Gwinnett's diversity. Yes it's diverse, but it doesn't have commuter rail. I'd note that Alpharetta, which is 15% Asian, does have train access.

On cities worth visiting: Fair point. Atlanta is not driving distance to world class cities like NYC or Boston. But of course, it is driving distance to small, quaint cities culture worth exploring: Nashville, Savannah, and New Orleans. And of course, the Airport will get you anywhere you want on a direct flight.

Local government: Far from perfect, but not as bad as D.C. Kasim Reed is immensely popular, far more so than Vincent Gray in D.C. Unlike Gray, Reed does not govern under threat of indictment.

Hope that helps. I happen to love D.C. and love Atlanta. Having lived both places, they are different, but not terribly different on the metrics you stated as important. (Where they differ in meaningful ways: (1) public transit/density; (2) affordability (3) political autonomy from red state). But my advice is to visit. There are people who love Atlanta and people who don't. I personally think Atlanta's strengths are its intown neighborhoods: Inman, Candler, Midtown, Virginia-Highland, Ponce-Highland, West Midtown. But even that is controversial on this board, as some people love their suburbs.
I'd make the argument that atlanta is great if you want to travel because of 1) it's relatively low cost of living, and 2) the amount of direct flights to europe of south america out of hartsfield

assuming you have a good paying job, you can take a yearly trip to awesome cities like madrid, paris, rome, buenos aires, etc. with the amount of money you'd be saving.
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 21,922,710 times
Reputation: 3853
Quote:
Originally Posted by germansoldiers View Post
Rule number 1. Beware of any place that is inexpensive. DC and the other "expensive" cities are costly for very good reasons.
The Atlanta metro is extremely varied in terms of real estate values and stability. I came to Atlanta from the Twin Cities, and while real estate is less expensive here compared to that midwest metro, it's perfectly possible to live in a nice, safe, and stable area with good schools and not have to worry about crime.

Yes, Georgia is a Republican state, and there are decisions made at the state level here that my Minnesota sensibilities just don't understand, but the metro area is slowly growing more liberal all the time, and I'm talking about an inflex of liberalism from other parts of the country, not the black Democratic influence you see in so much the City of Atlanta with its code of heavy social conservatism. The state is slowly changing.

Coming to Atlanta "because it's cheap" might not be the best reason to move here ... while some costs are lower, others might not be, and there may not be the same number of social safety nets here that you might be used to in other areas of the country. However, that doesn't make Atlanta a bad choice. Just make sure you know what you're getting into before making a housing purchase here. Rent before buying and get a firsthand feel for the area.
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 21,922,710 times
Reputation: 3853
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonygeorgia View Post
WHy do people from the Midwest think the south has bad race relations when the Midwest is the least desirable area in the USA with horrible race relations unless you are white
Because some urban areas of the midwest actually DO have good race relations.

Some of the older larger cities like Chicago, Detroit, and St. Louis might not, but areas like the Twin Cities most certainly do, and the racial tension here in Atlanta was a complete culture shock to me when I moved down here.

People are relatively well integrated up there because they have to be, really, unless they're a member of a newer immigrant group like the Hmong or Somali populations up there. Down here, everyone seems to like drawing lines in the sand and pointing fingers at the past. It's such a different attitude...
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 21,922,710 times
Reputation: 3853
Quote:
Originally Posted by MathmanMathman View Post
^ I think the very nature of diversity is that you can have no identity.
"Diverse" is not the same as "homogeneous". Sorry.
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