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Old 02-11-2013, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Georgia
4,945 posts, read 3,997,094 times
Reputation: 2750

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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadtrip75 View Post
Only a liberal could include increased housing costs in a list of "savings". LOL!

HONEY OUR RENT WENT UP AGAIN THIS MONTH, CRACK OPEN A BOTTLE OF CHAMPAGNE
What is this I don't even...
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Georgia
4,945 posts, read 3,997,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehoez View Post

i want to see more
Holy crap, it just dawned on me--most of the major Canadian cities are in that proposed network.
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Old 03-02-2013, 07:10 PM
 
28,147 posts, read 24,679,387 times
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The ATL has always been a train city.
Quote:
Amtrak ridership surged in recent years due to the success of short-distance routes, liberal think tank Brookings Institution reported Friday.

Atlanta is just a small part of that trend. With its one station on Peachtree Street and Deering Road in Buckhead, Atlanta saw 104,854 riders in 2012 -- up 29 percent from 81,259 in 1997.

About 90 percent of Amtrak’s ridership since 1997 has been on short-distance routes, driving a 55 percent jump in passengers and generating a positive operating balance of $47 million in 2011, Brookings Institution said. In 2012, 26 corridors under 400 miles carried 83 percent of all system riders.

More...Amtrak ridership in Atlanta up 29% since 1997 - Atlanta Business Chronicle
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Old 03-02-2013, 07:12 PM
 
2,407 posts, read 2,612,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
The ATL has always been a train city.
104,000 riders in a year? That is less than 285 riders per day.
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Old 03-02-2013, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Decatur, GA
4,909 posts, read 3,712,042 times
Reputation: 2465
That's 2.1 train cars each way per day (287 riders per day, 66 seats per coach). On a route spanning over 1300 miles on a train which only runs with 4 coaches, and 2 sleepers each direction. When you combine that with all the other stations, Atlanta provides a LOT of riders, about 88.5% of the ridership per train. Imagine how many more people would be served by just a second daily frequency? Even just to the northeast.
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Old 03-02-2013, 08:25 PM
 
2,407 posts, read 2,612,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattCW View Post
That's 2.1 train cars each way per day (287 riders per day, 66 seats per coach). On a route spanning over 1300 miles on a train which only runs with 4 coaches, and 2 sleepers each direction. When you combine that with all the other stations, Atlanta provides a LOT of riders, about 88.5% of the ridership per train. Imagine how many more people would be served by just a second daily frequency? Even just to the northeast.
With the proper investments, the 5+ million person metro area might crack that huge 300 riders per day barrier.
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Old 03-02-2013, 10:02 PM
 
28,147 posts, read 24,679,387 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtcorndog View Post
With the proper investments, the 5+ million person metro area might crack that huge 300 riders per day barrier.
Well, I think the point is that people will ride trains if they are available. They're a darn good way to get around and are popular all over the world.
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Old 03-02-2013, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
858 posts, read 1,086,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Well, I think the point is that people will ride trains if they are available. They're a darn good way to get around and are popular all over the world.
It's hard to say how many people would actually use them if they were available... it could be many, but it could also be few. On one hand they are a great way to travel if they're fast and connecting cities that don't require cars to get around, but on the other we have an almost ubiquitous car ownership rate and a very effective highway system that makes driving between car-friendly cities easy, not to mention a country that's spread out enough to make flying a viable option.

Unfortunately trains require so much initial capital that it's very risky to simply take the "build it and they will come" approach, which is why I don't see it happening (at least in the South) for a very long time, if ever. I would definitely love to have the option--options are never a bad thing, right? But the real question is whether it's economically viable, and I don't think it will be any time soon.
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Old 03-03-2013, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Georgia
4,945 posts, read 3,997,094 times
Reputation: 2750
Quote:
Originally Posted by erick295 View Post
It's hard to say how many people would actually use them if they were available... it could be many, but it could also be few. On one hand they are a great way to travel if they're fast and connecting cities that don't require cars to get around, but on the other we have an almost ubiquitous car ownership rate and a very effective highway system that makes driving between car-friendly cities easy, not to mention a country that's spread out enough to make flying a viable option.

Unfortunately trains require so much initial capital that it's very risky to simply take the "build it and they will come" approach, which is why I don't see it happening (at least in the South) for a very long time, if ever. I would definitely love to have the option--options are never a bad thing, right? But the real question is whether it's economically viable, and I don't think it will be any time soon.
Which is why I've said that they need to build the high-speed network roughly in the following order: Northeast, Midwest, Southeast and Pacific, Great Plains and the Rockies.
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
858 posts, read 1,086,335 times
Reputation: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Williams View Post
What I would like to see is a comparison between the amount of energy used by airplanes in relation to the number of passengers they move on a monthly or yearly basis vs. the energy used by passenger rail, just to see if there are any fuel savings or other similar advantages. Air travel or even buses don't have to be the end-all-be-all solution to cross-country travel, even in a big place like the U.S of A.
The numbers are out there on the Googles, but there's a reason freight companies aren't flying all of their goods around...
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