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Old 06-08-2018, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Historic West End
3,947 posts, read 3,249,793 times
Reputation: 3764

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Wow this was back in 2013. Those stations would be cost to opening now.
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Old 06-08-2018, 06:35 PM
bu2
 
8,968 posts, read 5,658,755 times
Reputation: 3529
Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
I think BRT becomes more viable in the close-in suburbs. Most subdivisions are located somewhere near a major road. Where I live, people already walk from their subdivisions to the bus, but the wait times are atrocious, especially for such busy corridors (In my case that would be Flat Shoals Rd and Roosevelt Hwy in South Fulton). For further out suburbs buses are too slow, you need commuter rail in the far suburbs and exurbs.
Commuter rail would be too slow in the far suburbs and exurbs. It would make too many stops. And it also has more capacity than needed.

The only solution for those areas is express buses that go direct to the destination with maybe one stop for transferees to different destinations.
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Old 06-08-2018, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Decatur, GA
4,907 posts, read 3,704,919 times
Reputation: 2460
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
Yeah, Suburban cul-de-sacs are never going to have viable high-capacity transit options.
Wrong. Most suburban "cul-de-sacs" are within a 5-10 minute drive of a major corridor. The suburbs are always going to be park and ride-style transit, no one is proposing bus stops outside of every house.

Quote:
The best businesses can do is locate near transit stops and their workers can follow to transit connected area. Or they can just get new workers as is happening in many of these cases. The companies are just fine losing car-dependant suburban workers in favor of transit connected folks in town.
Yea...no, that's not accurate at all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Commuter rail would be too slow in the far suburbs and exurbs. It would make too many stops. And it also has more capacity than needed.
Wrong, have you ever even studied the major commuter rail systems in this country? Even with stops, they're flying down the track at 79mph between stops and easily beating drive time into the cities

Quote:
The only solution for those areas is express buses that go direct to the destination with maybe one stop for transferees to different destinations.
Which is incredibly inefficient and not a good use of resources at all. To have decent transit, you need lots of frequencies. The spread out multipoint express bus model doesn't support that style.
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Old 06-08-2018, 07:52 PM
 
9,907 posts, read 6,891,298 times
Reputation: 3012
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattCW View Post
Wrong. Most suburban "cul-de-sacs" are within a 5-10 minute drive of a major corridor. The suburbs are always going to be park and ride-style transit, no one is proposing bus stops outside of every house.
Name any city in the world that has the same low density suburbs we have and you feel has the sort of high-capacity transit coverage you hope us to have there. Does not exist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattCW View Post
Yea...no, that's not accurate at all..


Quote:
The new [midtown] campus represents a consolidation of NCR’s offices in Duluth and Alpharetta under one roof. ...

When the campus officially opens in early 2018, up to 3,000 NCR employees will be based there.

“We expect those numbers will grow significantly over the next five years as we continue to hire top talent including software engineers, designers and developers,” said NCR CEO and Chairman Bill Nuti.

It’s one of the reasons why NCR chose Midtown for its new global headquarters was the proximity to Georgia Tech and the burgeoning talent pool bubbling up from universities in the metro area, he said. In a couple of years, a number of those fresh young college graduates will be working in the company’s newly built collaborative spaces, most notably, the NCR Innovation Lab. Our new Midtown headquarters will help drive innovation across our software, hardware, and services businesses and provide space for future growth,” said Nuti.
Quote:
Interface has been based in Vinings for 25 years. Gould said his executive team and employees like their location, but missed being in the middle of a vibrant city and part of a larger design community. They wanted close proximity to public transit, local restaurants and other amenities within walking distance on pedestrian-friendly streets. The new headquarters will be across from the MARTA Arts Center station, providing employees with a more sustainable commute option and visitors with quick access to and from the airport.

“Being near the MARTA is a smart choice for the workplace of the future,” Gould said.
https://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/...o-midtown.html

Quote:
“If we’re going after tech jobs, creative-type jobs, higher-paying office jobs, we’ve got to have transit to attract those jobs in the future,” [Stephen Cannon, president and CEO of Mercedes-Benz USA] said.
MARTA a sudden factor in company moves
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Old 06-08-2018, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Decatur, GA
4,907 posts, read 3,704,919 times
Reputation: 2460
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
Name any city in the world that has the same low density suburbs we have and you feel has the sort of high-capacity transit coverage you hope us to have there. Does not exist.
New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, Denver, Toronto, Montreal, Miami, Dallas (getting there), Boston, Salt Lake City, and I think I'm missing one or two.

Doesn't mean they're trying to exclude suburbanites, just means they're going the best place available now and hope to tap the suburban talent pool.
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Old 06-08-2018, 08:28 PM
 
9,907 posts, read 6,891,298 times
Reputation: 3012
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattCW View Post
New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, Denver, Toronto, Montreal, Miami, Dallas (getting there), Boston, Salt Lake City, and I think I'm missing one or two.
None of those are as low density as us, but if that is how low your bar is for transit coverage of suburbs then yes we can achieve that in a few decades. Yes, you may need to drive for a few miles out of your way to get to a bus stop that runs every 15 minutes during rush hour, but Ok.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MattCW View Post
just means they're going the best place available now
And what does that mean? The "best place available now" for attracting new workers is not in disconnected suburbs but transit connected core?

I agree that are not trying to "exclude" suburbanites. But you agree they are trying to to attract urban, transit commuters, correct?

Last edited by jsvh; 06-08-2018 at 09:10 PM..
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Old 06-09-2018, 03:21 AM
 
Location: Historic West End
3,947 posts, read 3,249,793 times
Reputation: 3764
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlwarrior View Post
Wow this was back in 2013. Those stations would be cost to opening now.
^ close to opening
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Old 06-09-2018, 09:08 AM
bu2
 
8,968 posts, read 5,658,755 times
Reputation: 3529
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattCW View Post
Wrong. Most suburban "cul-de-sacs" are within a 5-10 minute drive of a major corridor. The suburbs are always going to be park and ride-style transit, no one is proposing bus stops outside of every house.

Yea...no, that's not accurate at all.

Wrong, have you ever even studied the major commuter rail systems in this country? Even with stops, they're flying down the track at 79mph between stops and easily beating drive time into the cities

Which is incredibly inefficient and not a good use of resources at all. To have decent transit, you need lots of frequencies. The spread out multipoint express bus model doesn't support that style.
When it gets close in its not doing 79 mph. I know NY Metro doesn't do 79 through Harlem. Maybe when it gets to Connecticut. If you have HOV/HOT lanes your bus is doing 70 mph. Its not making any more than one stop (if that). And it lets you off close to your destination. Its just a better deal for the commuter all around.

It is vastly more efficient than building new rail lines. And its still more efficient than using existing freight track (which likely doesn't have the design for high speeds). And in Atlanta, you either force people to transfer to MARTA when they get in close or you have to spend massive amounts to get passenger tracks into downtown, duplicating MARTA HRT infrastructure.

Express buses also have lower capacity which means you can go have routes to alternate destinations. A North Gwinnett bus could go to downtown and midtown. Another could go to Buckhead. Another could go to Perimeter Mall. Houston, for example, has 27 park n ride lots blanketing the area, all of which access downtown. From 8 of those you can catch an express bus to the Texas Medical Center, which is the 2nd biggest employment center. (map near bottom of this page if you are curious-https://www.ridemetro.org/Pages/RidershipReport-032018.aspx#red). There local buses get about 190k a day, the original short rail line gets about 40k, later rail additions get 20k and park n rides get 30k.
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