U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-03-2013, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,243 posts, read 4,642,001 times
Reputation: 2739

Advertisements

Researchers from George Washington Univ, Georgia Tech, and the ARC announced Wednesday that metro Atlanta has reached "peak sprawl".

Quote:
Since 2009, 60 percent of new office, retail and rental properties in Atlanta have been built in what Christopher Leinberger calls "walkable urban places" – those neighborhoods already blessed by high Walk Scores or on their way there...

This is indicative that we’re seeing the end of sprawl," says Leinberger, a research professor with the George Washington University School of Business, who led the study in conjunction with Georgia Tech and the Atlanta Regional Commission. "It does not say that everything turns off. There will still be new drivable suburban development. It’s just that the majority will be walkable urban, and it will be not just in the redevelopment of our downtowns, but in the urbanization of the suburbs."
The study points out that rents in more walkable neighborhoods in metro Atlanta are fetching a premium. Residential rentals in walkable areas were 112% higher than their suburban counterparts. For commercial renters, walkable properties were 147% higher. I'm not sure how significant that stat is, I would always assume in a healthy city, more urban/walkable properties would be more valuable. Interesting stat none the less.


I'm not surprised with these numbers, but its good to see numbers backing up my assumptions. Despite some guests to our forums assumptions, it has been obvious to me that the trend toward smart development has been pretty strong in our fine city. However, part of me gets the impression the guy is having fun with stats and making the numbers prove his own theory. Dunno.


What do you guys think about this?
Have We Reached Peak Sprawl? - Emily Badger - The Atlantic Cities
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-03-2013, 04:32 PM
 
1,637 posts, read 2,135,450 times
Reputation: 788
No
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2013, 04:41 PM
 
Location: East Atlanta
454 posts, read 447,865 times
Reputation: 423
There's always room for one more Wal-Mart in Bremen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2013, 05:02 PM
 
29,393 posts, read 26,345,718 times
Reputation: 10281
I don't think we are even close to peak sprawl.

With all our new energy sources, we should be in good shape to continue offering people reasonably priced homes with plenty of elbow room and excellent schools.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2013, 05:12 PM
 
Location: I-20 from Atlanta to Augusta
1,313 posts, read 1,487,399 times
Reputation: 585
Everyone should keep in mind that because of the lack of geographic barriers the Atlanta could spread as far east as Augusta, as far west as Birmingham, as far north as Chattanooga, and as far south as Macon and really there are few things that could stop it. I understand this seems crazy and scary but consider Augusta for example. With the collaboration between UGA and GRU especially in terms of research and the growth of the Augusta MSA, now you have situation where the Athens MSA and the Augusta MSA are only separated by only two counties. Factor in Atlanta and the GA 316 project which should shoot growth more growth into Athens and you can only image in a few decades that gap becoming smaller.

Last edited by dpatt.marine1; 10-03-2013 at 05:42 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2013, 12:05 AM
 
6,180 posts, read 5,560,404 times
Reputation: 4201
Quote:
Has Atlanta reached peak sprawl?


I agree with the other posters that Atlanta has not yet peak sprawl (particularly peak automobile-oriented sprawl).

Though, there is potentially a strong argument to be made that Atlanta may have likely reached peak low-density automobile-oriented sprawl as developers have figured out that they can make even more profits by cramming more single-family homes (attached single-family homes and closely-spaced detached single-family homes with small lots...or high-density automobile-oriented sprawl, if you will) into the same amount of land area that might have only included detached single-family homes with large lots in years' past.

I also agree with the findings and arguments of the researchers that demand for walkable and transit-friendly higher-density development is increasing sharply as society changes with the public growing increasingly vary of long rush-hour and peak-hour commutes to and from work.

I also agree that a traditionally automobile-dominated metro area like Atlanta will see more walkable and transit-friendly higher-density development built both in its urban core and its suburbs in the future as demand continues to rise for both walkable transit-friendly development and demand continues to remain high (but clearly not as high as it was in decades' past) for automobile-oriented development.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2013, 05:03 AM
 
Location: atlanta
4,184 posts, read 4,872,812 times
Reputation: 3540
in terms of distance away from atlanta, yes.

a previous poster said that potentially atlanta could extend to augusta, for example. this is patently absurd. people commute to work, and there's only so far people can commute back and forth to work everyday. right now, the distance seems to be about 40 miles from their jobs. any further than this and you see a serious dropoff in development. people are not going to commute that far to work everyday in traffic.

could commuter rail change this? yes, but even then, you'd only see "sprawl" around commuter rail stations and not extending directly from the atlanta area.

could the I-85 corridor continue to densify making job centers further out from atlanta? yes, it's very possible that along the I-85 corridor especially, that you would see cities like commerce pop up as job centers, potentially bringing sprawl to far-fetched areas. but such a densification wouldn't be "part of atlanta" since those commuting to jobs would not be commuting to jobs in the atlanta area.

that's generally how new areas are determined to be part of the metro area— whether or not people are commuting to jobs in the central metro area.

in the case of atlanta, it's gotten about as far as it can go. i can't see it going any further unless job centers start moving outwards also.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2013, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Duluth, GA
1,255 posts, read 992,738 times
Reputation: 1217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Born 2 Roll View Post
I also agree with the findings and arguments of the researchers that demand for walkable and transit-friendly higher-density development is increasing sharply as society changes with the public growing increasingly vary of long rush-hour and peak-hour commutes to and from work.
This is what has me thinking that, while we haven't reached our peak sprawl capacity [no geographic barriers, etc], we have reached the periphery of how far out people are willing to go, vis a vis, how much of their income is spent on gas, how long their willing to put up with sitting in a car, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2013, 05:43 AM
 
Location: Duluth, GA
1,255 posts, read 992,738 times
Reputation: 1217
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryantm3 View Post
could the I-85 corridor continue to densify making job centers further out from atlanta? yes, it's very possible that along the I-85 corridor especially, that you would see cities like commerce pop up as job centers, potentially bringing sprawl to far-fetched areas.
You know those half-mile long warehouses they built alongside I-85 near Commerce? They built those specifically to drum up investor interest in the area, not much of which has actually taken place, and those warehouses are completely empty. One of the warehouses in Braselton [the one across from the Haverty's building] just recently had Carter's move in, but it took years before any tenant moved in, and that's 20 miles closer than Commerce.

I only know this because I pass by these places twice a day on my commute to north Fulton.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2013, 05:48 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
2,009 posts, read 2,146,880 times
Reputation: 2282
The article (or blurb) is light on details, because sprawl can be interpreted a few different ways.

I think the researcher is wrong about Atlanta having reached peak sprawl, but I do not think he is incorrect about the effects. I think that infill, basically higher density construction is going to be the trend going forward.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top