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Old 12-04-2014, 04:21 PM
 
7,713 posts, read 9,577,479 times
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So the people in the film industry know where to look, but they aren't finding what they need here.

Well, allow me to postulate that perhaps they are looking in the wrong places. According to the article, line and associate producers make sure the production stays on budget. Are you telling me there are no people in Atlanta who know how to keep budgets and are willing to do so for $600 per day? And what exactly makes a qualified candidate? It's not like they teach you how to do that in film school, you have to learn on the job. So the talent pool that is lacking will forever be lacking unless the industry takes risks on junior level people and develops them.

Working in film isn't like being a doctor or lawyer. You can't just go to school, learn what you need, and now you're ready to go. You have to work your way into it, but from what I've seen, talent in Georgia is not being developed by these productions. They seem to have a "gives us exactly who we need or else we'll bring them with us" attitude.

And....

Quote:
“We’ve had to bring in a fair amount of construction people – painters and carpenters – from out of town,” Geiger said. “It’s a different skill set and a different set of expectations from regular carpentry. Sets aren’t built like homes – walls come out and go back in. They’re put together differently.”
This is ridiculous. Are you telling me that someone who knows carpentry, or knows how to paint, can't be trained up on these differences and become adept at them? Are you further telling me that it's cheaper to fly someone in from LA and put them up in a hotel every night of the production, then fly them back when it's done than to find someone who has 85% of what you need and have them learn the other 15% on the job? And I really don't see how the painting required could be that different.

Sounds to me like every excuse in the book is being made to import talent rather than develop it.

I'm not talking about expecting directors, DPs, cinematographers, editors, and other super skilled people to be procured locally immediately. But gimme a break, you can find local freaking APs or train someone how to be one in a day or two.
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Old 12-04-2014, 04:26 PM
 
5,004 posts, read 5,763,844 times
Reputation: 2995
Calm down. Jesus. I'm referring to traditional film jobs. Seriously, why are you so worked up?
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Old 12-04-2014, 04:49 PM
 
7,713 posts, read 9,577,479 times
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I'm just frustrated at all the media attention the film industry is getting and all the tax incentives when I don't feel like it is really doing anything sustainable to help many of the people who live in Georgia.

There are many people knowledgable about film and TV from programs like GSU's communications program and recently let go people from Turner Broadcasting that would be really great candidates for jobs like these. I know a lot of people from both camps, but so far, I don't really know anybody who has been able to get a job in the film business, except as an extra.
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Old 12-04-2014, 11:39 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,163 posts, read 15,994,670 times
Reputation: 9182
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
I'm just frustrated at all the media attention the film industry is getting and all the tax incentives when I don't feel like it is really doing anything sustainable to help many of the people who live in Georgia.

There are many people knowledgable about film and TV from programs like GSU's communications program and recently let go people from Turner Broadcasting that would be really great candidates for jobs like these. I know a lot of people from both camps, but so far, I don't really know anybody who has been able to get a job in the film business, except as an extra.

If you had bothered to read the story, you'd understand that the labor shortage is mostly due to the sheer amount of film and TV work going on right now. According to the state film office, there are 27 major motion pictures and TV series currently in production in Atlanta -- TWENTY SEVEN! Nobody could have predicted this much demand. There simply aren't enough skilled workers to go around.


In the past two months, I've worked on 5 different movies ... all of them major productions with big budgets and huge crews. Sure, senior producers, directors, cinematographers, etc. come from LA or NYC for the duration of the project. But that could be 4-5 months, and they don't all live in hotels. Many rent houses. Most who work on TV shows are here much longer -- often 6-8 months -- and many have second homes here, just for the convenience.

You would be surprised just how many of the rank-and-file crew base ARE local. I've met dozens of people who've moved their families here from California, North Carolina and Louisiana. These people have very specific skill sets -- props, wardrobe, hair, makeup, lighting design, lighting tech, drivers, sound recorders, sound mixers, set designers, set builders, heavy equipment operators, continuity, catering, craft services, special effects, stunt performers, pyrotechnics, security, medic, communications, script runners, casting, The list goes on and on. And most ALL of them are members of their respective trade unions. You can't just walk onto a set and get hired.

Since Pinewood Studios opened last year, the city of Fayetteville has issued more than 60 licenses for businesses that come to town just to service the film and TV industry. These include an exotic plant nursery. a heavy equipment company, a provider of vintage cars and other vehicles -- even an animal trainer wrangler

Clayton State University and Southern Crescent Tech both offer film training. Georgia Military College is building a brand new campus across from Pinewood for the same purpose. The Fayette County School System is even exploring the possibility of creating a film and TV magnet program for high school students.
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Old 12-05-2014, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
1,957 posts, read 2,006,068 times
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I think you're using the word 'local' to mean something other than what the rest of the folks on the thread do.

In the context of this discussion, one of the crew on a set that had moved their family over (whether on a a permanent or semi-permanent basis) would be a transplant, and not a local since they are not from here.

That being said, I think the criticism leveled is fair. How is news of this type of labor shortage relevant (to locals) if there is no path for locals to secure the work (or even the training) required?

A lot of people (myself included) only have a tenuous grasp on the type of networking that has to be done to begin to establish some kind of foothold for industry crew work. The only reason I have any sort of clue is because two childhood friends of mine earn a living doing crew work (in NYC and LA).

What do you do if you don't have any connections? Its not like you can submit a resume or show up and ask for work on a set.

As a matter of fact, there is a TV show that films semi-occasionally exactly 1 mile from my house along my commuting/jogging route. I've only ever chatted with the security folks, and I have zero idea of how I would go about getting looked at by a hiring or casting manager (if I were interested).
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Old 12-05-2014, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
265 posts, read 302,970 times
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Crew work is one thing, but it's not really all that difficult to get into acting. First thing is you go get some professional headshots done. Then you get an agent. Then, if you went with a good agency and not your best friend's cousin, you start going to auditions. Then, it's a numbers game. Eventually you get bookings. You start off getting roles as extras. Then, featured extras. Then you get some principle roles thrown in the mix, and before you know it your acting resume dictates that you pretty much only get principles. This whole process and timeline gets streamlined a bit when you take acting classes so that your resume looks busier.

Source: I was a relatively successful actor as a child. Not in movies or TV shows, but lots of commercials.

For crew work you really need to have some training in order to get work, and in most states it requires belonging to the corresponding union. So taking some classes at community college or technical school would be the best way to start that path, followed by joining the union and paying dues.
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Old 12-05-2014, 08:03 PM
 
7,713 posts, read 9,577,479 times
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Wow, that seems like an awful lot of trouble to get work as a line producer or location scout!
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Old 12-05-2014, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
265 posts, read 302,970 times
Reputation: 524
True. But that can be said about a lot of industries. For instance, I work in radio now, but it took forever to break into that industry even though I had an extensive resume as an audio engineer. I mean, I've worked on Grammy-winning albums, recording and mixing upwards of a hundred channels at a time, yet to get work in radio, recording single channel voiceovers, was a huge undertaking. It's because I was new to the specific industry.
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Old 12-05-2014, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,163 posts, read 15,994,670 times
Reputation: 9182
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
Wow, that seems like an awful lot of trouble to get work as a line producer or location scout!


LINE PRODUCER: According to Producers Guild of America (PGA) guidelines, the Line Producer is the individual who reports directly to the individual(s) receiving "Produced By" credit on the theatrical motion picture and is the single individual who has the primary responsibility for the logistics of the production, from pre-production through completion of production; all Department Heads report to the Line Producer.

LOCATION MANAGER: The location manager is a member of the film crew responsible for finding and securing locations to be used, obtaining all needed fire, police and other governmental permits, and coordinating the logistics involved for the production to successfully complete its necessary work. They are also the face of the production to the community and responsible for addressing the issues that may arise due to the production's impact on the community. In Hollywood, they are represented by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 399 and in New York and Chicago they are represented by the Directors Guild of America (DGA) for features and television work. Additionally, nationwide, they have the Location Managers Guild of America, a non-profit corporation dedicated to the promotion and interests of their members and their relations with the general public, communities and industry partners
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