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Old 12-05-2014, 08:55 PM
 
5,364 posts, read 4,889,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
It's about the whole metro that's usually considered south Atlanta, south of 20. I agree with you about the closer in areas, but you forgot Forest Park and Hapeville, cites that are closer to the airport and denser than Riverdale.
If you're talking about everything south of I-20, including Intown areas, I think that almost every area with a MARTA stop south of I-20 (West End, a likely future stop where the Beltline meets the current Red/Gold MARTA HRT Line, Oakland City, Lakewood-Fort MacPherson, East Point and College Park) will see gentrification and redevelopment at some point in the future.

I think that every neighborhood that is close to a transit station on that MARTA Red/Gold HRT Line is going to become much more valuable real estate over the next half century or so. The same goes for any real estate that is close to the portion of the Beltline that is south of I-20.
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Old 12-06-2014, 04:49 AM
 
2,599 posts, read 2,977,616 times
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Why do I bristle at the notion that people always associate improvmt in an area with the arrival of gentrification. I think this is sad. There is the possibility that areas can improve with the people already living in the area still being the only ones there and influx of business, right? We slap the people in the face who live in these communuties by indicating they or their area will never be anything until others come in and save them (aka the gentrification train arrives). We need to stop.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Born 2 Roll View Post
If you're talking about everything south of I-20, including Intown areas, I think that almost every area with a MARTA stop south of I-20 (West End, a likely future stop where the Beltline meets the current Red/Gold MARTA HRT Line, Oakland City, Lakewood-Fort MacPherson, East Point and College Park) will see gentrification and redevelopment at some point in the future.

I think that every neighborhood that is close to a transit station on that MARTA Red/Gold HRT Line is going to become much more valuable real estate over the next half century or so. The same goes for any real estate that is close to the portion of the Beltline that is south of I-20.
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Old 12-06-2014, 07:52 AM
 
5,364 posts, read 4,889,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovelySummer View Post
Why do I bristle at the notion that people always associate improvmt in an area with the arrival of gentrification. I think this is sad. There is the possibility that areas can improve with the people already living in the area still being the only ones there and influx of business, right? We slap the people in the face who live in these communuties by indicating they or their area will never be anything until others come in and save them (aka the gentrification train arrives). We need to stop.
If you're talking about deteriorating inner-city neighborhoods improving with the lower-income residents living in those areas, that is what usually happens in the beginning of the "gentrification" process of a deteriorated inner-city neighborhoods where higher-income buyers slowly and gradually begin to move into an area inhabited with lower-income residents.

Higher-income buyers continue move into a deteriorating inner-city area until the point where the area becomes hot and the real estate prices in the area are no longer affordable for lower-income residents.

The lower-income property owners that may already be living in a revitalizing neighborhood are often bought out by speculative investors and higher-income residents moving into the area while lower-income residents that might have moved into that neighborhood if it were not being revitalized are forced to move into other lower-priced areas with real estate prices that they can afford.

(...Lower-income renters are forced out when the owners of the properties that they are renting sellout to real estate buyers offering to pay higher prices in an area on the rise....Often times a property may also be sold off in a newly hot inner-city area when an older lower or limited-income resident passes away and the family and/or the estate of the individual sells the property to investors.)

If a deteriorating inner-city neighborhood is being gentrified and/or revitalized, chances are that at some point in the gentrification/revitalization process, the lower-income residents that are living in that neighborhood at the beginning of the process will most likely not be living in that area near the end of the gentrification/revitalization process, save for some kind of special government program or gov't edict that requires that a certain percentage of dwellings be set aside for lower-income residents in new high-density multi-family developments in a revitalizing area.

It is a brutal reality and a downside to the gentrification/revitalization process where deteriorating and blighted inner-city neighborhoods inhabited by lower-income residents transition into hot Intown neighborhoods inhabited mostly or almost completely by higher-income professionals with lower-income residents being pushed out of an area....But it's a cold and brutal reality that is part of the process where declining and blighted inner-city neighborhoods transition into hot Intown areas that are appealing to higher-income real estate buyers and residents.

(...How many neighborhoods in Intown Atlanta are we currently witnessing the same gentrification/revitalization process occur where lower-income residents living in a deteriorating neighborhood eventually get pushed out of a market because of higher real estate prices?)
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Old 12-06-2014, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, Ga
1,861 posts, read 1,815,206 times
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Glad I don't have to worry about schools as an issue, and if I ever do adopt kids then they'll probably be home schooled or private schooled anyway. I'm not fixing to pay three times the price for half the space in an area that's still not even that walkable. I can easily live near downtown and have a walkability factor for a great price. Sure I may not have retail right next to me, but that's what transit/cars are for..
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Old 12-06-2014, 03:22 PM
 
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I like it. Once I find a job ITP, East Point and College Park are the first places I'll be looking to buy
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Old 01-06-2015, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,861,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
I can only offer my personal take...

I've lived in Atlanta for almost 20 years. No matter where you live, you usually find reason to go to certain areas for one reason or another. You want to check out AMC Prime and it's in Alpharetta, you get invited to a friend's house in Marietta, or you need a specialty piece of furniture that is only available in a store in Lawrenceville. Whatever the reason, we find ourselves visiting communities we don't live in.

As long as I have lived in Atlanta, I have NEVER had occasion to visit the southside, save for to visit friends on a couple of occasions in Peachtree City. As a result, I just don't really KNOW VERY MUCH about it.

AND, when we visit places, sometimes it piques our interest. For example, if you have to come to Duluth for something, you might say, "wow, there are a lot of authentic Asian restaurants here, I'll have to remember this so I can come check them out sometime." And then you do, and become familiar with the area. But my visits to the southside, which have admittedly been limited to Peachtree City and I-75 exits on the way to Florida, I just didn't see anything that made me feel like I needed to return for anything.

It seemed to embody all the things people complain about when talking about the suburbs. Nothing but chain restaurants and a pretty bland are with no real character. I know that's not true of the northern suburbs, but it really seems more true of the southern ones. I recently wandered into South Lake Mall because I was in the area. There's no reason for me to ever return.

I will say that going to Tomorrowworld made me appreciate how beautiful South Fulton is. But there's really nothing down there, just a bunch of houses and nothing I saw that would make me want to come back for a visit. Because after all, on a normal day, I can't just run around on some guy's horse farm.

So I guess you would say the southside has no real draw. People don't find themselves exploring it much because what is there to explore? It's also not densely populated, so there is less of a chance that you will find yourself there visiting friends.
No real draw on the Southside?
So you never been to the airport?
Look up Aerotropolis? Porshe found a reason to be there.

Fayetteville is getting the massive Pinewood Studios.
Sure enough there is evidence that the Southside
Is in the early stages if a high growth period.

Aerotropolis will be a huge draw.
There are some nice small quaint cities on the Southside just like the North.
Newnan, Jonesboro (the real home of Gone With the Wind), College Park have some quaint downtowns with beautiful old homes and historic buildings.
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Old 01-06-2015, 07:26 PM
 
62 posts, read 71,662 times
Reputation: 60
Peachtree City is terrible... You guys should all live and stay on the north side of Atlanta.
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Old 01-06-2015, 07:29 PM
 
6,795 posts, read 6,591,740 times
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Buckhead pretty much started the affluent trend northward.
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Old 01-06-2015, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Valdosta (Atlanta Native)
3,443 posts, read 2,818,989 times
Reputation: 2148
Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
No real draw on the Southside?
So you never been to the airport?
Look up Aerotropolis? Porshe found a reason to be there.

Fayetteville is getting the massive Pinewood Studios.
Sure enough there is evidence that the Southside
Is in the early stages if a high growth period.

Aerotropolis will be a huge draw.
There are some nice small quaint cities on the Southside just like the North.
Newnan, Jonesboro (the real home of Gone With the Wind), College Park have some quaint downtowns with beautiful old homes and historic buildings.
Not to mention
Lake Spivey
ClayCo Intl Park/Beach
Spivey Hall
McDonough
Hampton/Atlanta Motor Speedway
Southlake/Southpoint Malls
Countless Nature Preserves/Animal Sanctuaries/ Parks/ Trails
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Old 01-06-2015, 08:24 PM
 
346 posts, read 273,368 times
Reputation: 295
Often, people are so immersed in the current trends, it makes future predictions difficult. Who would have thought, 30 years ago, that ITP would be considered cool? Decatur seemed bland and uninteresting before the incredible 1990's growth. Hints that some are seeing possibilities on the southside include the Porsche development, Pinewood Studios, Serenbe and the international festival, TomorrowWorld. Note that when Atlanta Movie Tours takes visitors on movie location tours, most of the locations are on the southside.

Last edited by chuckshere; 01-06-2015 at 09:50 PM..
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