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Old 12-31-2014, 09:01 PM
 
Location: N.C. for now... Atlanta future
1,241 posts, read 983,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
This is from the US Census. 2030 population projections:

What was that based upon? 2010-2013 growth? Georgia has routinely added more people than NC over past 30 odd years. I don't expect they will overtake Georgia. Of course, projections must be taken with a great big grain of salt because anything could happen.
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Old 01-01-2015, 06:25 AM
 
4,980 posts, read 5,743,435 times
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Quote:
However you can't mistake small for stagnant
I'm not. All I'm doing is pointing that population increase does not = growth as in the implied economic way and additionally population growth does not mean in-migration. Often, the increase is mostly through natural change as I pointed out yesterday.

And by noting this, I'm not wishing for continued stagnation for these places. It's challenging for smaller cities and Atlanta benefits from compounding gains and more varied industries that come with its size.
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Old 01-01-2015, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
1,714 posts, read 1,984,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlantaIsHot View Post
What was that based upon? 2010-2013 growth? Georgia has routinely added more people than NC over past 30 odd years. I don't expect they will overtake Georgia. Of course, projections must be taken with a great big grain of salt because anything could happen.
Demographers accurately predicted in 1990 that Georgia's population would, for the first time, surpass NC by 2000.

They've remained neck and neck ever since, always within 200,000-300,000 of one another.

But, if you disagree you should contact them and tell them that you prefer that Georgia always remain a little ahead of NC. After all, Georgia is the largest state east of the Mississippi in land area.
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Old 01-01-2015, 10:26 AM
 
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Well after all "Atlanta is hot"

If one feels that so strongly about Atlanta and by extension GA is "hot" so much that their city data name is such, it's no wonder that bias would top reality.

NC simply has more areas growing at a decent pace. Also once Charlotte and the Triangle hit a certain threshold, their growth will expand even more so, if they are typical of other metros at such periods.
Also, it's typical as cities mature, for growth to slow.
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Old 01-01-2015, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Outer Boroughs, NYC
1,541 posts, read 1,167,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Born 2 Roll View Post
The growth of those second-tier metros is important because there are other large states that are completely dominated by one metro region.

Cumulative population growth contributions driven by economic assets like the major international seaport and Fort Stewart at Savannah, Fort Benning outside of Columbus, Fort Gordon outside of Augusta, Robins Air Force Base in Warner Robins, Moody AFB outside of Valdosta, etc.
TRUE: Georgia's second-tier cities are doing pretty well economically and demographically (all except for Macon). It's just that any dynamism in the second tier is simply blunted by Atlanta's 5.6 million people and Atlanta's national and international prestige.

FALSE: Any sentence constructed with "Ft. Stewart at Savannah" must be challenged. Ft. Stewart is not in any way "at Savannah." While Ft. Stewart has some residual effect on Savannah's larger CSA economy, Ft. Stewart lies well outside Savannah's three-county metropolitan area and its MSA economy -- very few military families live in the Savannah MSA, for example, and few if any live in Savannah-Chatham. The list of "few" and "rarely" is quite long. This is very unlike the general situation with Ft. Gordon/Augusta, Ft. Jackson/Columbia, or Moody AFB/Valdosta -- and it's TOTALLY unlike classic southern military towns and their adjacent military bases such as Columbus/Ft. Benning or Fayetteville/Ft. Bragg.
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Old 01-01-2015, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,858,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Actually although I left it ambiguous, Idid think for on N.C. of Charlotte,Raleigh, and Greensboro were exactly the cities that came to mind.
When looking up these cities in national publication s this is how they are mentioned
Quote:
Originally Posted by masonbauknight View Post
TRUE: Georgia's second-tier cities are doing pretty well economically and demographically (all except for Macon). It's just that any dynamism in the second tier is simply blunted by Atlanta's 5.6 million people and Atlanta's national and international prestige.

FALSE: Any sentence constructed with "Ft. Stewart at Savannah" must be challenged. Ft. Stewart is not in any way "at Savannah." While Ft. Stewart has some residual effect on Savannah's larger CSA economy, Ft. Stewart lies well outside Savannah's three-county metropolitan area and its MSA economy -- very few military families live in the Savannah MSA, for example, and few if any live in Savannah-Chatham. The list of "few" and "rarely" is quite long. This is very unlike the general situation with Ft. Gordon/Augusta, Ft. Jackson/Columbia, or Moody AFB/Valdosta -- and it's TOTALLY unlike classic southern military towns and their adjacent military bases such as Columbus/Ft. Benning or Fayetteville/Ft. Bragg.
It may not physically be in Savannah but Its most certainly a vital part of Savannahs economy.
Savannah has the biggest hospital with more specialized treatments,the airport people fly out of,the main shopping centers people shop and many of the spouses of military work in Savannah.Not to mention on a Friday night where do you think the young soldiers go to hang out?Downtown Hinesville?LOL.What about when the spouses of the military want to go out and eat?There's only so many times you want tho eat at Applebee's.

Hunter AB is in Savannah too so realize that these bases are linked together in there mission.There is a lot of back and forth.
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Old 01-01-2015, 12:13 PM
 
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It's false to state that Atlanta holds the second tier cities back. If Atlanta wasn't here (or nearly as large), other big cities would have a similar impact on the same GA cities. State lines don't matter in this regard.

If anything, the second tier cities would suffer as they wouldn't have the benefit of sucking tax dollars from Atlanta and wouldn't have the benefitting of positioning themselves as "near" yet "cheap" alternatives to Atlanta etc etc (insert whatever Chamber of Commerce angle there).
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Old 01-01-2015, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Outer Boroughs, NYC
1,541 posts, read 1,167,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
It may not physically be in Savannah but Its most certainly a vital part of Savannahs economy..
Important to Savannah's trading-marketing region (CSA), true, but not intrinsically vital to the city and its metro area. As for Hunter AAF, it's actually very small. Savannah's relationship to Ft. Stewart is quite distant compared to real 2nd-tier urban/military conjunctions in Georgia -- it would have to be, as Stewart's soldiers and their families are rarely residents of the Savannah MSA at all. And there's no comparison whatsoever between Savannah and true southern military towns like Columbus or Fayetteville.
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Old 01-01-2015, 04:05 PM
 
5,361 posts, read 4,886,734 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masonbauknight View Post
TRUE: Georgia's second-tier cities are doing pretty well economically and demographically (all except for Macon). It's just that any dynamism in the second tier is simply blunted by Atlanta's 5.6 million people and Atlanta's national and international prestige.

FALSE: Any sentence constructed with "Ft. Stewart at Savannah" must be challenged. Ft. Stewart is not in any way "at Savannah." While Ft. Stewart has some residual effect on Savannah's larger CSA economy, Ft. Stewart lies well outside Savannah's three-county metropolitan area and its MSA economy -- very few military families live in the Savannah MSA, for example, and few if any live in Savannah-Chatham. The list of "few" and "rarely" is quite long. This is very unlike the general situation with Ft. Gordon/Augusta, Ft. Jackson/Columbia, or Moody AFB/Valdosta -- and it's TOTALLY unlike classic southern military towns and their adjacent military bases such as Columbus/Ft. Benning or Fayetteville/Ft. Bragg.
Quote:
Originally Posted by masonbauknight View Post
Important to Savannah's trading-marketing region (CSA), true, but not intrinsically vital to the city and its metro area. As for Hunter AAF, it's actually very small. Savannah's relationship to Ft. Stewart is quite distant compared to real 2nd-tier urban/military conjunctions in Georgia -- it would have to be, as Stewart's soldiers and their families are rarely residents of the Savannah MSA at all. And there's no comparison whatsoever between Savannah and true southern military towns like Columbus or Fayetteville.
Those are some good points that Fort Stewart officially lies outside of Savannah's three-county MSA.

But, like afonega1 alluded to, the presence of Fort Stewart so close to Savannah's MSA contributes substantially to the positive health of the Savannah regional economy as a whole.

That's because the military personnel who use and are stationed at Fort Stewart not only contribute to the positive health of the Savannah regional economy just by being stationed in Hinesville (which, of course is part of the Savannah CSA), but also contribute to the Savannah metropolitan economy when they travel into the Savannah MSA to shop, dine, socialize, be entertained, fly in and out of the airport, etc.

Also while you make a good point that the military personnel who are stationed at Fort Stewart are rarely residents of the Savannah MSA while serving in the military, there are many military personnel stationed at Fort Stewart who elect to live in the Savannah MSA after retiring from the armed forces....Something which seems appropriate given that the Savannah area (particularly the seaside communities in the area) draws many retirees because of its year-round warm climate and its coastal location.

The presence of Fort Stewart in the Savannah CSA is one of those factors that helps the Savannah area perform even better than it already was going to do with its warm year-round climate, coastal location and very-large international seaport.
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Old 01-01-2015, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Outer Boroughs, NYC
1,541 posts, read 1,167,651 times
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@B2R. All the points you make about Ft. Stewart's contribution are nonetheless of the residual, "percolating up and trickling down" variety. One simply cannot list Ft. Stewart as a key component of Savannah's economy (like the Port of Savannah, the 4 local universities, the medical centers, and tourism). Ft. Stewart is too far away for that. What I really take issue with is your pat expression "Ft. Stewart at Savannah". That is totally off the wall, as it most emphatically is not. That kind of lingo is fine for Columbus or Warner Robins or Hinesville, but Ft. Stewart doesn't directly contribute to Savannah's economy the way military bases contribute to GA's other 2nd-tier cities. Big shopping expeditions and old sergeants and their spouses retiring in Savannah? Quite secondary to say the least. Savannah is not a military town in the sense that some other southern cities its size are military towns, or dependent on military families. Sorry, no dice.
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