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Old 12-24-2014, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Watkinsville, GA
376 posts, read 893,890 times
Reputation: 398

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jero23 View Post
The area's redevelopment doesn't need the "whitewashing" that areas of East Atlanta has gone through which has been cause of so much tension between longtime residents and the newcomers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by matilda79 View Post
To Jero: Not a fan of East Atlanta. Completely soulless now, in my opinion. The West End, hopefully, is doing things right.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cparker73 View Post
As a new resident of Atlanta that moved to a gentrifying area south of Memorial Drive, I understand the concerns of whitewashing, but I think the bigger issue is economic. If all the new builds were being done by affluent black families, would there be as much of a backlash even if the character of the neighborhood and types of businesses catered to the tastes of the new residents?
Wow, racism is alive and well in the ATL.

As far as The Bluff goes, I would not go in the area, even in daylight, without a CCW.

I worked at Fire Station 16 for many years and our entire first in territory(which includes The Bluff) was dangerous.
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Old 12-24-2014, 02:39 PM
 
145 posts, read 238,004 times
Reputation: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ga Jerk View Post
Wow, racism is alive and well in the ATL.

As far as The Bluff goes, I would not go in the area, even in daylight, without a CCW.

I worked at Fire Station 16 for many years and our entire first in territory(which includes The Bluff) was dangerous.
While Jero and Matilda may be thinking along racial terms, I think it has to do more with economics. The grit and character that attracts a certain type of gentrifier becomes less acceptable the higher up the socioeconomic ladder you get. As a black man in one of Decatur's ubiquitous new Craftsmans with a household income possibly three times higher than my neighbors in a 40-year-old duplex, I'm aware that I'm contributing to the changing character of the neighborhood. I'd argue that it's for the better, but Jero and Matilda would characterize it as whitewashing.
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Old 12-24-2014, 02:46 PM
 
27,815 posts, read 24,873,797 times
Reputation: 16536
I've heard those same terms used when it's affluent Whites gentrifying a White working-class neighborhood.
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Old 12-24-2014, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,882,578 times
Reputation: 2908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I've heard those same terms used when it's affluent Whites gentrifying a White working-class neighborhood.
You're right.People forget Cabbagetown up until the 90s was an enclave of poor white descendants from the Appalacians that lived and worked at the cotton milll.
Not far from there you can even see the grave of one of the earlieat country music artist.
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Old 12-24-2014, 08:18 PM
 
246 posts, read 208,786 times
Reputation: 258
I think my meaning in an earlier post may have misinterpreted a bit, here.

Actually, my term "soul-less," as mentioned about East Atlanta, was not referring specifically to race, or "whitewashing," as someone put it (although, yes, that is sort of a side effect), but it WAS in reference to having a single housing and retail type that caters to a single income bracket. This shuts out nearly all people of a certain age, income or lifestyle. And yes, it does exclude certain races, too.

All "new" development occurs this way, but more so, it seems, the rapid development. I would just hope that at minimum the English Avenue area might give a small consideration to long time residents, even if there are not but a few left.
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Old 12-25-2014, 02:19 PM
 
2,599 posts, read 2,987,021 times
Reputation: 1426
Consideration for original residents almost never happens at any significant level, anywhere. That's why I always challenge the notion that "gentrification" is to be sought and is some sort of great, highly-sought situation. All gentrification basically is is a bunch of ppl with more money coming in and buying at higher than the properties were ever worth for the poor ppl who lived there originally, thereby immediately jacking up the taxes and causing a bunch of old ppl in fixed incomes to lose their homes or to sell to investors for rock bottom prices when investors call - and the investors do. Basically, poor ppm get de-stabilized, wealthier ppl move in and snatch up the properties for relatively cheap and then the poorer ppl have to leave. Capitalism at its best ala Grant Park, for example. Ala the renowned Cabrini Green area in Chicago as another. Pick any inner city neighborhood in the country being "brought back" and the model is the same as what I outlined. It's a money maker. Move in at higher prices, cause the taxes to shoot up thereby facilitating massive loss of homes and investors swoop in to buy up the rest or call the owners who are old ppl and offer them pennies. The old ppl sale and the investors tweak the houses and resale for much more than what they put into it. Once the perception of the area changes to a majority area from a minority area it is suddenly considered desirable (thank latent racism for that). Once considered desirable, the prices continue to escalate. Only the decently middle class or moderately wealthy can live in the area that was once a minority area considered undesirable. The look of the neighborhood gas none of the earlier residents unless there is an apartment building that the new residents have not figured out how to get torn down as yet. Capitalism at its best.
Quote:
Originally Posted by matilda79 View Post
I think my meaning in an earlier post may have misinterpreted a bit, here.

Actually, my term "soul-less," as mentioned about East Atlanta, was not referring specifically to race, or "whitewashing," as someone put it (although, yes, that is sort of a side effect), but it WAS in reference to having a single housing and retail type that caters to a single income bracket. This shuts out nearly all people of a certain age, income or lifestyle. And yes, it does exclude certain races, too.

All "new" development occurs this way, but more so, it seems, the rapid development. I would just hope that at minimum the English Avenue area might give a small consideration to long time residents, even if there are not but a few left.
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Old 12-28-2014, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
294 posts, read 348,290 times
Reputation: 157
If I ever did want to invest in the English Avenue area I would buy a home, renovate it, then rent it out to either an urban pioneer, a HBCU student, or section 8 applicant and wait for that area to get better. You will eventually be able to sell it for a large profit or continue renting it as the rental rates increase. If a lot of people do this that are good landlords and care about their investment and property the area will slowly improve. Then you will get more people who purchase to move their own family into those homes. Having some sort of standard commercial shopping area helps a lot when families look into these areas. The Walmart they built there nearby has been kind of under the radar but Im sure its helping!
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