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Old 01-20-2015, 10:18 AM
 
5 posts, read 4,334 times
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Hello everyone,

I am planning to buy my first single family home in the Alpharetta/Johns Creek/cumming area. I don't find any new constructions in the Johns Creek/Alpharetta area and a new home with a basement costs something above $420k in the cumming area. My budget is 350k. So I decided to look at old homes as well and saw a 1999 built home in Johns Creek(30005). This home is 350k with a new roof,new floor, new kitchen appliances, new paint etc.. The backyard is not so good and is not of much use. But that is ok for me. Now I am not sure if the age of the home will be a key factor if I plan to sell this home after 5-8 years. Will I atleast get the price I am buying this home for?. The school district is a very good one. The community is very good mixed community. Lot of shopping and dining options around...

Please share your ideas and suggestions if I can move forward with this property or if I should be concentrating more on a new home.
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Old 01-20-2015, 10:52 AM
 
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The vast majority of homes are older than 1999... much older. I don't see the issue. The fact is that most people do not own new construction and it's practical.
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Old 01-20-2015, 11:50 AM
bUU
 
Location: Georgia
11,692 posts, read 8,187,818 times
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The one thing we were warned about regarding homes build in the 1990s was the prevalence of cheaply installed fiber cement siding. Apparently, a number of installers around here installed it like regular siding (measure; cut; attach) instead of going through the laborious process of effectively sealing every cut, presumably because doing so would make the installation of that siding more expensive than installation of traditional siding. The result (which was saw in a couple of cases) was invariably water damage after a period of time.

New communities around here seem to tout how much brick siding they're using - one saying, "brick siding!" and the next raising the ante saying, "brick siding all four sides!" - something which we didn't seen touted as a selling point in other parts of the country as much as here. I'm guessing that that's a reaction to how many homeowners got burned by the fiber cement siding twenty years ago.

If you don't at least avoid homes with such siding, be sure to get a home inspector to inspect every bit of the siding for any signs of damage. We decided not to even consider homes with that siding - it would be just one more thing to have to worry about in perpetuity.
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Old 02-10-2015, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,160 posts, read 15,968,942 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bUU View Post
The one thing we were warned about regarding homes build in the 1990s was the prevalence of cheaply installed fiber cement siding. Apparently, a number of installers around here installed it like regular siding (measure; cut; attach) instead of going through the laborious process of effectively sealing every cut, presumably because doing so would make the installation of that siding more expensive than installation of traditional siding. The result (which was saw in a couple of cases) was invariably water damage after a period of time.

New communities around here seem to tout how much brick siding they're using - one saying, "brick siding!" and the next raising the ante saying, "brick siding all four sides!" - something which we didn't seen touted as a selling point in other parts of the country as much as here. I'm guessing that that's a reaction to how many homeowners got burned by the fiber cement siding twenty years ago.

If you don't at least avoid homes with such siding, be sure to get a home inspector to inspect every bit of the siding for any signs of damage. We decided not to even consider homes with that siding - it would be just one more thing to have to worry about in perpetuity.
That siding was already outlawed / banned by 1999, so this should not be a problem.

As to the OP: Don't know your age, but a 15-yo house is not an "old" home. Depending on the builder (which in the Johns Creek area, I assume is reputable) a home of that age should still be in fine condition. And with the upgrades / improvements you've mentioned, I can't imagine why this house would be a problem.

The biggest thing affecting home values is the status of the overall market, location and school districts, not the age of the property, IMO. There are tons of houses much older than yours and in need of complete overhauls that ask ridiculous prices, and get them, as long as the location is right.
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Old 02-10-2015, 03:13 PM
bUU
 
Location: Georgia
11,692 posts, read 8,187,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
That siding was already outlawed / banned by 1999, so this should not be a problem.
We found it still there (though in at least one case, clearly degrading) on a number of homes for sale that we looked at, homes built in the 1990s. It's still a big concern for people buying homes in this area.
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Old 02-10-2015, 03:27 PM
 
7,710 posts, read 9,562,945 times
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I thought I had Hardie Plank on my house, but a handyman recently told me it was Louisiana Pacific siding. I'm not sure what it is, except I've always thought it was ugly. It was really the only choice in my price range. I know both my inspector and multiple handymen have told me that it is in good shape and I only need to replace planks individually as they rot (which I haven't had to do, but I can see a couple spots where the previous homeowner did).

I really have no idea how to tell what I have or if it was installed properly. All I know is nobody has raised a red flag on it.

I think no matter what you do, there's going to be a product that has a class action lawsuit on it someday. Who knows what new stuff they are using now that people will be up in arms about 10 years from now.

I'd stick to brick if possible. At least that stuff has been around for hundreds of years, so we pretty much know it works. Unfortunately, you need a lot of money in Atlanta to get 4 sided brick, so I bet you're going to have to settle for siding somewhere on your house. I never wanted siding, but it was pretty much the only choice I had. I imagine if I stay in the house long enough I will have to replace it all eventually, which actually won't be terrible because it might finally give me the chance to get some decent insulation in place!
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Old 02-10-2015, 03:33 PM
 
561 posts, read 309,014 times
Reputation: 1822
Quote:
Originally Posted by bUU View Post
The one thing we were warned about regarding homes build in the 1990s was the prevalence of cheaply installed fiber cement siding. Apparently, a number of installers around here installed it like regular siding (measure; cut; attach) instead of going through the laborious process of effectively sealing every cut, presumably because doing so would make the installation of that siding more expensive than installation of traditional siding. The result (which was saw in a couple of cases) was invariably water damage after a period of time.

New communities around here seem to tout how much brick siding they're using - one saying, "brick siding!" and the next raising the ante saying, "brick siding all four sides!" - something which we didn't seen touted as a selling point in other parts of the country as much as here. I'm guessing that that's a reaction to how many homeowners got burned by the fiber cement siding twenty years ago.

If you don't at least avoid homes with such siding, be sure to get a home inspector to inspect every bit of the siding for any signs of damage. We decided not to even consider homes with that siding - it would be just one more thing to have to worry about in perpetuity.
Your warning about bad siding is true and important to know about for the 1990's houses around Atlanta, but the vast majority of the bad siding installed was not the fiber cement kind (HardiPlank), but the far worse pressed wood type such as Masonite or LP (Lousiana-Pacific) as well as others.
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Old 02-10-2015, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
1,155 posts, read 1,677,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bUU View Post
We found it still there (though in at least one case, clearly degrading) on a number of homes for sale that we looked at, homes built in the 1990s. It's still a big concern for people buying homes in this area.
Nice nugget of information. Do you know of a website that details this? Or insight on other problems by decade? For example, housing built in 60s, 70s, 80s, 2010s?
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Old 02-10-2015, 10:56 PM
 
561 posts, read 309,014 times
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Default hardboard siding

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhtrico1850 View Post
Nice nugget of information. Do you know of a website that details this? Or insight on other problems by decade? For example, housing built in 60s, 70s, 80s, 2010s?
Here's some info on the class action lawsuits:
HADD - Home Owners Against Deficient Dwellings |
http://www.hadd.com/documents/siding.pdf

A google search on "hardboard siding" turns up endless links of problems.

Hardboard siding works just fine if it is properly installed and maintained, which means keeping it painted and keeping joints caulked.
However, you have no way of knowing how it was installed and what the past maintenance was.

I have hardboard siding on my 1993 house. I am not the original owner, but I believe that it had not been re-painted until I painted it in 2014.

The bottom row all the way around the house was deteriorating - getting soft and having chunks 2-4 inches long knocked off the very bottom. It was mostly cosmetic damage. I think the source of the water was rain splash from the ground.

The siding was actually holding up better than the wood brick molding around the windows and the wood on the eaves. Regular painting is just as much a must for wood as it is for the cheap siding.

The chimney chase was another story. Those boards were quite noticeably softened. I replaced almost all of them, and while doing the repair, I could see that the damage came from water coming in the ends of the planks which had never been painted, and the caulking had deteriorated so water could get into the ends. In other words, not installed correctly and not maintained correctly.

Although I finally did the work myself, I got two estimates to do those repairs. One was for $1800 for the chimney chase, and the other bid was for $2400 for the chimney chase. The boards around the sides were like $300 more, I think. That's not bad for 20 years.

Replacement boards that I bought were about $20 for a 16-foot long by ~ 1 foot wide board.
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Old 02-11-2015, 04:24 AM
 
Location: Alpharetta, GA
285 posts, read 160,445 times
Reputation: 237
For what it's worth, Ryland Homes is building new homes off of exit 14 that are in the low to mid 300s.

Marketplace Commons - New Homes in Cumming, GA 30041 | Ryland Homes
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