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Old 02-05-2015, 11:54 AM
 
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"For decades in metro Atlanta, rapid population growth was always first associated with the suburbs.
Of course, now the reverse migration back to American cities is covered daily, and it's no different here in Atlanta."


BeltLine CEO: "Millennials hate cookie-cutter" - Atlanta Business Chronicle
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Old 02-05-2015, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Historic West End
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In another 10 years this could get real interesting as political power will also shift back to the inner city with the influx of new millennials.
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Old 02-05-2015, 12:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Atlwarrior View Post
In another 10 years this could get real interesting as political power will also shift back to the inner city with the influx of new millennials.
Wonder what will happen to the old (former) millennials?
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Old 02-05-2015, 12:31 PM
JPD
 
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Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Wonder what will happen to the old (former) millennials?
There's no such thing as a new or former millennial. Millennial is a fixed thing, just as Gen X and Baby Boomer are fixed things.
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Old 02-05-2015, 12:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Atlwarrior View Post
In another 10 years this could get real interesting as political power will also shift back to the inner city with the influx of new millennials.

Agreed - you already see them giving Boomers a run for their money on the national Political stage. But will it still be "the inner city" in ten year.
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Old 02-05-2015, 12:44 PM
 
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That's the interesting question I've always postulated....

Sure, living in the O4W is attractive if you're young and work there. But, what happens when you want to buy? Can you afford to there? What about when you have kids? Will you send them to school there?

I actually wouldn't be surprised to see the pendulum swing back the other way in 10 years.

It's all cyclical and time will tell.
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Old 02-05-2015, 01:05 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
That's the interesting question I've always postulated....

Sure, living in the O4W is attractive if you're young and work there. But, what happens when you want to buy? Can you afford to there? What about when you have kids? Will you send them to school there?

I actually wouldn't be surprised to see the pendulum swing back the other way in 10 years.

It's all cyclical and time will tell.
Exactly. People seem to act as if Millennials are an entirely different breed of human that has disrupted typical anthropological patterns in the human life cycle.

Wait 'til they have kids and/or realize they cannot afford to live in the same neighborhood in an actual house or condo with a mortgage. Or wait til they grow older (we all do, Millennials won't be young forever; in fact, all of them aren't now - some are already in their early-mid 30s), and they just want a different pace and style of life.

Growth continues in the suburbs, and the lifestyle commonly (and sterotypically) associated with suburban life is changing. We see all around us all these towns and communities in the Metro Atlanta area creating their own pedestrian-friendly town developments, with residential in the mix. Eventually, many suburbs will offer the better of both worlds, IMO (but with good schools and the ability to actually become a homeowner).
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Old 02-05-2015, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
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I believe it is an incorrect assumption that those who currently live in town and prefer living in walkable communities are going to abandoned that preferred lifestyle. There are a variety of areas where you can achieve that lifestyle without the costs of say a 2,000 SF home in Virginia Highland.

People need to realize that there is a difference between a suburb and not being a walkable community. Decatur is a suburb, Roswell is a suburb, Woodstock is an exurb, etc. However, what these places are doing are building walkable, community oriented development. These places will thrive as people who prefer walkable communities move for whatever reason.

Atlanta will continue to thrive as there are a variety of neighborhoods with affordable living options. Schools are improving, young parents are becoming involved in the schools, and overall, the city is becoming safer.

But that's not to imply people won't move out of the city limits. There are just so many WalkUPs and this is a good thing.

To summarize, the younger generations prefer living in walkable communities. These communities come in a variety of shapes and sizes and will continue to grow in popularity. Areas built that can't accommodate these sort of developments will, in my opinion, for the most part, stagnate.
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Old 02-05-2015, 01:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ATLJR View Post
I believe it is an incorrect assumption that those who currently live in town and prefer living in walkable communities are going to abandoned that preferred lifestyle. There are a variety of areas where you can achieve that lifestyle without the costs of say a 2,000 SF home in Virginia Highland.

People need to realize that there is a difference between a suburb and not being a walkable community. Decatur is a suburb, Roswell is a suburb, Woodstock is an exurb, etc. However, what these places are doing are building walkable, community oriented development. These places will thrive as people who prefer walkable communities move for whatever reason.

Atlanta will continue to thrive as there are a variety of neighborhoods with affordable living options. Schools are improving, young parents are becoming involved in the schools, and overall, the city is becoming safer.

But that's not to imply people won't move out of the city limits. There are just so many WalkUPs and this is a good thing.

To summarize, the younger generations prefer living in walkable communities. These communities come in a variety of shapes and sizes and will continue to grow in popularity. Areas built that can't accommodate these sort of developments will, in my opinion, for the most part, stagnate.
I think when this cohort approaches retirement - even if they did move way out, they will probably come back to the city as well because they don't have the hangups and baggage of "city living" as something for poor people and the suburbs as proof that you've "made it" that the previous generations have had. Theirs is a completely different paradigm.

But, it's rough living out in a car dependent burb, when you are too old to drive. I see that with a lot of the retired folk in my community that are way out in the 60's and later suburbs part of town.

It's funny - I am GEN X - I grew up in those suburbs, but when it was time for me to settle down, I opted for a small patch of land with a funky old house on it, close to the train, and highways. All of those choices are based on having a place where I could age in place and have a semblance of independence and sustainability with my little urban farm plot and all that. And I see that with a lot of my fellow Slacker neighbors. We want just enough, and convenience, at an affordable price. But a lot of us have opted out of having kids too, so there's that.
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Old 02-05-2015, 01:25 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
12,998 posts, read 17,156,281 times
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Not true. Millennials love having cookie-cutter personalities and political views.
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