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Old 03-03-2015, 09:27 AM
 
Location: ATL for now
46 posts, read 51,087 times
Reputation: 76

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Fairly new to the area and I've recently been utilizing E-W Connector, say between S. Cobb and Powder Springs road 'shopping district' to avoid traffic in Smyrna/Cumberland. I've noticed several restaurants abandoned, what looks like a former warehouse shopping center and other empty storefronts. What's with this area? It appears to have a lot of housing, with even more coming in. Shopping/dining in the Cumberland area is beginning to get overcrowded and South Cobb drive doesn't really have any good dining options at all.

Certainly seems, at least to me, E-W Connector area could benefit from more retail and restaurants, and the Target, the out of date 80s style Target, time for a remodel!
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Old 03-03-2015, 11:48 AM
 
446 posts, read 505,878 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstreets6 View Post
Fairly new to the area and I've recently been utilizing E-W Connector, say between S. Cobb and Powder Springs road 'shopping district' to avoid traffic in Smyrna/Cumberland. I've noticed several restaurants abandoned, what looks like a former warehouse shopping center and other empty storefronts. What's with this area? It appears to have a lot of housing, with even more coming in. Shopping/dining in the Cumberland area is beginning to get overcrowded and South Cobb drive doesn't really have any good dining options at all.

Certainly seems, at least to me, E-W Connector area could benefit from more retail and restaurants, and the Target, the out of date 80s style Target, time for a remodel!

that area still recovering from the recession. right now the main focus is the road situation which hasnt moved much between members of the county government. windy hill and cumberland area seems to be the main focus with the six flags area and parts of north cobb getting some type of attention
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Old 03-03-2015, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,458 posts, read 7,261,125 times
Reputation: 4205
There is also a weird trend that happens in rapidly growing cities like Atlanta. The neighborhoods go through a cycle before stabilizing. When a neighborhood is new it is often hit with a surge of young families, which then age and there is a period where more empty nesters than normal are around.

The issue is families produce more street level consumer retail spending than empty nesters. Whereas retirees might spend more money on cars, housing, trips, medical, etc..

So when the neighborhoods are mostly new the local area is very attractive to retailers, but then it goes through a 15-20 year period where it can't sustain what was built previously.

When the area stabilized it can't attract as much retail as existed when it was all families, but it can attract a fair bit more than when it was predominately empty nesters.

This leads to a very leap-frog approach to retail growth.
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Old 03-03-2015, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Downtown Marietta
1,062 posts, read 690,203 times
Reputation: 1334
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
There is also a weird trend that happens in rapidly growing cities like Atlanta. The neighborhoods go through a cycle before stabilizing. When a neighborhood is new it is often hit with a surge of young families, which then age and there is a period where more empty nesters than normal are around.

The issue is families produce more street level consumer retail spending than empty nesters. Whereas retirees might spend more money on cars, housing, trips, medical, etc..

So when the neighborhoods are mostly new the local area is very attractive to retailers, but then it goes through a 15-20 year period where it can't sustain what was built previously.

When the area stabilized it can't attract as much retail as existed when it was all families, but it can attract a fair bit more than when it was predominately empty nesters.

This leads to a very leap-frog approach to retail growth.
Great analysis. I'd rep you if I hadn't already done so the maximum number of times!
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Old 03-03-2015, 01:12 PM
 
Location: ATL for now
46 posts, read 51,087 times
Reputation: 76
Appreciate the replies.

I guess I don't know the neighborhoods well enough to realize that it's more empty nesters versus younger families. I just see a lot of new housing being built yet abandoned store fronts.
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