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Old 03-07-2015, 12:21 PM
 
1,114 posts, read 1,939,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billl View Post
I can't speak for others. I love where I live and I love where I work. It's just unfortunate that they aren't very close to each other. Also, my wife works in Kennesaw.

I've known people who go out of their way to ensure they live near where they work so that they have easy commutes. Then they lose their job. Or their office moves. Or they get bought out. Or some other event occurs that causes the job to relocate elsewhere. Then they're back to lousy commutes. That's life.
Or they can live in the job center and improve their flexibility. I've lived in Cobb twice...first in Vinings when I was in school and then in Marietta off exit 267 a few years later early in my career. After spending far too much of my life commuting, especially during the point where my job was in Norcross (near the Duluth side) and 75->285->Peachtree Industrial was killing me even on the 3-4 days/wk I actually went into the office. My rent was next to nothing and I was driving my shiny new luxury car but every other week it'd be a ~2hr commute when there was bad weather or someone just decided to ram the median.

I moved to Midtown to get my grad degree ~7yrs ago and the corresponding reduction in commuting time has been amazing. I've changed jobs twice first to a job in Vinings and now to one downtown (but currently ~80% travel) and the reverse commute meant I was never driving for more than 30 minutes at its worse. Being central has worked across 3 different jobs in the metro including one point where I could take Marta 5 min to my client site or 10 min the other way to the office. Even now when I'm going to the airport, it's a $18 (12 min) Uber ride. My SO and I have cut down to a single car and our combined driving is less than 15k/yr...I used to hit 20-25k by myself.

My current client is in Plano, TX and I get to see Cobb County's version of utopia. Corporate HQs as far as the eye can see, 8,000sf houses for everyone (on 1/8 acre lots), 6 lane roads in every direction, freeway interchanges every 3-4 miles, parking decks are always larger than the actual destination, morbid obesity off the charts, Ford super duty pickups for 30 mile commutes alone, and strip mall shopping in all directions. The hotel is ~3 miles from the office but we don't dare leave before 7pm b/c of traffic...a simple trip to downtown Dallas can take 1.5 hrs for 19 miles unless we leave after 8.
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Old 03-07-2015, 12:40 PM
 
5,372 posts, read 4,891,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I'm not sure MARTA would help very much.
Quote:
Originally Posted by afdinatl View Post
It would if they had a line to downtown and one to the Perimeter. There will always be traffic though like in DC. DC has a nice rail system and they still have bad traffic
Both arjay and afdinatl make a good point that a heavily-populated county like Cobb would still have really bad traffic even with high-capacity passenger rail transit service.

High-capacity passenger rail transit service (like heavy rail and commuter rail) would not make traffic any better in a fast-growing large major metro region of over 6 million people like Atlanta.

Heck, the increased high-density development that would be sparked along such a high-capacity passenger transit line would likely add to traffic and make it even worse than it is already going to be with the continued population growth....This has been the case in some parts of the Washington D.C. metro area, particularly in the D.C. suburbs of Maryland and Northern Virginia where increased high-density development has popped up around many high-capacity passenger rail stations (around DC Metrorail and MARC and VRE commuter rail stations) and generated increased traffic in suburban areas like Montgomery County (Maryland), Arlington County (Virginia) and Fairfax County (Virginia).

What high-capacity passenger rail transit will do for continued fast-growing heavily-populated outlying areas like Cobb (and North Fulton and Gwinnett and beyond) is to give commuters a critically-needed alternative to getting around outside of mostly single-occupant automobiles on a severely-congested and politically-limited undersized road network.

High-capacity passenger rail transit will give commuters a way to get between areas like Town Center and Perimeter Center and/or Town Center and Downtown Atlanta on the frequent days that major roadways like I-75, US 41 and the I-285 Top End Perimeter may be completely gridlocked during peak hours.

High-capacity passenger rail transit will also give important people (...important people like high-level corporate executives who like to bring high-paying jobs and industry with them when they relocate into Metro Atlanta and North Georgia from other parts of the nation and the world) a viable and critically-needed way to get around when the aforementioned major roadways are completely impassable due to traffic gridlock.

High-level corporate executives and business travelers still need to get to and from the world-leading Atlanta Airport when our very few major roadways are completely impassable with peak-hour traffic gridlock.

Commuters and employees still need to get to and from work in and around major regional employment centers like Town Center, Cumberland, Perimeter, Norcross/Peachtree Corners, Emory, Buckhead, Midtown, Downtown, Fulton Industrial, ATL Airport, etc, when our very few major roadways are completely impassable with peak-hour gridlock.

High-capacity passenger rail transit (along with bus and local shuttles, hired car services, toll lanes, etc) gives people a way to get around in a severely road-limited major metropolis of over 6 million people when the few major roads that we have become impassable due to severe traffic gridlock.

High-capacity passenger rail transit (regional heavy rail and regional commuter rail) absolutely must be part of the equation in a major metropolis of over 6 million people where road space is increasingly severely limited.
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Old 03-07-2015, 12:44 PM
 
4,982 posts, read 5,746,531 times
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Why is Cobb singled out? Is it because 85 is a picnic?
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Old 03-07-2015, 12:57 PM
 
240 posts, read 160,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeP View Post
Why is Cobb singled out? Is it because 85 is a picnic?
Because they are the old farts that keep blocking Marta. They will get their punishment when the Braves kick off in 2017. Maybe they'll change their minds then.
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Old 03-07-2015, 01:24 PM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU
4,129 posts, read 3,224,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeP View Post
Why is Cobb singled out? Is it because 85 is a picnic?
85 isn't too bad in the HOT lane. You at least have that option. 75 has no alternatives at all at the moment.
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Old 03-07-2015, 01:35 PM
 
994 posts, read 1,109,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sedimenjerry View Post
I feel for the people that work at NCR in Duluth, bought a house nearby but now will be forced to commute intown. And if they complain about the commute people on here will ask why the didn't move close to work. Offices move. It happens and if you just bought a house it's expensive to just up and move when you can just commute. Throw in a family who has roots in an area, school friends and all, or a spouse who still works nearby and you really don't have much of a choice.
Yeah, the idea that moving by one's job as a permanent solution is pretty shortsighted.
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Old 03-07-2015, 01:43 PM
 
994 posts, read 1,109,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sualpine View Post
Because they are the old farts that keep blocking Marta. They will get their punishment when the Braves kick off in 2017. Maybe they'll change their minds then.
Do you even live in Cobb?
It's crazy how it seems like on here those who loathe and are preoccupied with Cobb spend a lot of time thinking about it, analyzing it and opining it.
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Old 03-07-2015, 03:06 PM
 
5,372 posts, read 4,891,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeP View Post
Why is Cobb singled out? Is it because 85 is a picnic?
One would have to ask the OP why they asked the question about commute times on I-75 in Cobb County in particular.

Though your questions do raise a good point...

That I-75 NW through Cobb County is not the only major radial/cross-regional commuter route with severe traffic congestion issues.

I-85 NE obviously has some major traffic congestion issues even with the HOT Lanes and GA 400 North arguably has major traffic issues that are even worse than I-75 on many days (...though business and political leaders in the GA 400 North corridor are trying to get heavy rail expanded up to the Windward Parkway area of North Fulton County).

Other major radial corridors (like I-20 E, I-20 W and I-75 S) and the I-285 Top End Perimeter cross-regional corridor also have severe traffic congestion issues that (like the Northside radial commuting corridors) could each use multimodal alternatives (like toll lanes and high-capacity passenger rail transit) so that commuters will still be able to move through those corridors when they are gridlocked and impassable with severe traffic congestion.
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Old 03-07-2015, 04:28 PM
 
5,372 posts, read 4,891,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -thomass View Post
Every morning on the news, I see crazy commute times on 75S. How do you people up there do it? I'd go nuts having to put up with that on a daily basis.
Quote:
Originally Posted by -thomass View Post
Fair enough, but why do you think people accept this way of life?
Quote:
Originally Posted by andy1324 View Post
I leave very early, like 615. That avoids the worst of it.

Edit: I accept it because cobb has good schools, low crime, and low cost of living. Great place for a family.
andy1324's comments raise an excellent point...

Most people accept long rush hour and peak-hour commutes from and to outlying areas like Cobb County (and other OTP Metro Atlanta suburbs) because of the lifestyle that is available in those areas.

...A lifestyle that includes:

> Good public schools (...Some of the public schools in Cobb County are regarded as being some of the absolute best public schools in the entire Southeastern U.S. and even in the entire country...

...There are some school clusters in Cobb County (particularly the East Cobb school clusters) where the quality of education is considered to be so good that the kids that graduate from the high schools in those clusters in good academic standing are considered to have an excellent shot at gaining admission to virtually ANY postsecondary institution in the nation, including Ivy League and Ivy League-level institutions)...

> Low crime (though crime is most certainly not non-existent OTP (crime has risen and continues to rise in outlying OTP areas like Cobb County with the continuing increases in population), generally and traditionally crime has been lower in an area like Cobb County than it has been ITP...though that is changing in many areas)...

> Low cost-of-living (generally and traditionally, one has been able to buy more home and more land in the suburbs OTP for than they might be able to get ITP....Property taxes have also generally been lower OTP than ITP).
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Old 03-07-2015, 05:48 PM
 
1,037 posts, read 1,230,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Born 2 Roll View Post
andy1324's comments raise an excellent point...



...A lifestyle that includes:

> Good public schools (...Some of the public schools in Cobb County are regarded as being some of the absolute best public schools in the entire Southeastern U.S. and even in the entire country...

...There are some school clusters in Cobb County (particularly the East Cobb school clusters) where the quality of education is considered to be so good that the kids that graduate from the high schools in those clusters in good academic standing are considered to have an excellent shot at gaining admission to virtually ANY postsecondary institution in the nation, including Ivy League and Ivy League-level institutions)...
Yes. good schools - - but this is bordering on hyperbole.
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