U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-12-2015, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,177 posts, read 16,173,511 times
Reputation: 4899

Advertisements

Pace Properties Files Plans For 144-Unit Student Housing Project Downtown | What Now Atlanta
New 144 student housing along with the numerous other projects, eg: Atlanta daily world building conversion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-12-2015, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Downtown Marietta
1,062 posts, read 690,787 times
Reputation: 1334
This may well be a good thing, but the proliferation of apartment buildings in this area concerns me a bit. They certainly are not likely to draw as many long-term residents who care and actively invest their time, money and energy into the neighborhood as dense single family houses or townhomes would. Furthermore, while these apartments may be shiny and new now, what will they be like 10, 15, 20 years from now? What kinds of tenants will they attract when they're a bit worn and tired looking?

These issues are even more salient when talking about student housing, which, by definition, has a transient resident base. And students, generally speaking, almost certainly cause greater wear-and-tear on apartments than non-student mid-to-upper income tenants.

Full disclosure: I'm a white, liberal (not that either should matter) homeowner in a gentrifying section of downtown Marietta. So, I'm interested in urban renewal but have no particular skin in this game; I'm all for the revitalization of areas near downtown Atlanta, too, but am simply concerned that adding so many apartments may not have a lasting, long-term positive effect.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 12:43 PM
 
Location: NW Atlanta
4,995 posts, read 3,481,906 times
Reputation: 2647
Quote:
Originally Posted by evannole View Post
This may well be a good thing, but the proliferation of apartment buildings in this area concerns me a bit. They certainly are not likely to draw as many long-term residents who care and actively invest their time, money and energy into the neighborhood as dense single family houses or townhomes would. Furthermore, while these apartments may be shiny and new now, what will they be like 10, 15, 20 years from now? What kinds of tenants will they attract when they're a bit worn and tired looking?

These issues are even more salient when talking about student housing, which, by definition, has a transient resident base. And students, generally speaking, almost certainly cause greater wear-and-tear on apartments than non-student mid-to-upper income tenants.

Full disclosure: I'm a white, liberal (not that either should matter) homeowner in a gentrifying section of downtown Marietta. So, I'm interested in urban renewal but have no particular skin in this game; I'm all for the revitalization of areas near downtown Atlanta, too, but am simply concerned that adding so many apartments may not have a lasting, long-term positive effect.
Considering that this is the central business district, I don't think single-family homes/townhomes are very appropriate for this area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 12:45 PM
 
9,918 posts, read 6,906,853 times
Reputation: 3022
Uh, is that a serious post evannole? You seriously think they need to be building single-family homes in downtown? That there is some problem building apartments there that will not be a problem with apartments built in Kennesaw?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,177 posts, read 16,173,511 times
Reputation: 4899
Quote:
Originally Posted by evannole View Post
This may well be a good thing, but the proliferation of apartment buildings in this area concerns me a bit. They certainly are not likely to draw as many long-term residents who care and actively invest their time, money and energy into the neighborhood as dense single family houses or townhomes would. Furthermore, while these apartments may be shiny and new now, what will they be like 10, 15, 20 years from now? What kinds of tenants will they attract when they're a bit worn and tired looking?

These issues are even more salient when talking about student housing, which, by definition, has a transient resident base. And students, generally speaking, almost certainly cause greater wear-and-tear on apartments than non-student mid-to-upper income tenants.

Full disclosure: I'm a white, liberal (not that either should matter) homeowner in a gentrifying section of downtown Marietta. So, I'm interested in urban renewal but have no particular skin in this game; I'm all for the revitalization of areas near downtown Atlanta, too, but am simply concerned that adding so many apartments may not have a lasting, long-term positive effect.
These are strictly student housing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Downtown Marietta
1,062 posts, read 690,787 times
Reputation: 1334
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
Uh, is that a serious post evannole? You seriously think they need to be building single-family homes in downtown? That there is some problem building apartments there that will not be a problem with apartments built in Kennesaw?
Right in the middle of downtown, no, I agree, that's no place for SF development.

To be fair, I didn't look at the map to see exactly where this was going. My post was more related to what's going in along the streetcar route and along the Beltline in general. Just a bit too much real estate devoted to rental property, in my estimation.

And, no, I fully agree that overbuilding of apartments can cause issues everywhere, from intown to the suburbs. I owned and lived in a townhouse in an area with many nice apartments and SF homes for years and saw many apartment complexes go from being the hip, shiny places that young professionals wanted to live in to something less interesting (not bad, by any stretch, but just a bit worn). The same clientele would then move on to the next new, shiny complex, or they'd buy something, in the same general area. Meanwhile, the SF portfolio continued to appreciate in value, and prices are now well above pre-recession levels.

Apartments just don't wear as well as owner-occupied homes, regardless of whether those homes are townhouses, condos or SF detatched houses, and with rare exceptions (like NYC, where purchasing is extremely difficult for the average household), they don't lead to people sticking around and contributing to the neighborhood in the long term.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
298 posts, read 283,913 times
Reputation: 348
@evannole

I don't understand the stigma that many seem to have with apartments. I certainly understand the desire to demand more from many of the recent developers in regards to design, facades, and perhaps retail components, but I disagree with the premise that people don't contribute to the neighborhood in the long term and (not that you said this, but I have heard it elsewhere) are destined to turn into slums.

To address your primary statement, it would be hard to argue that apartments don't wear, internal at least, more so than owner occupied residences, that's certainly natural, but there are run down single family homes, town homes, and condos all over the place. While I am sure there are bad multifamily landlords, there are also bad SFH owners. In regards to contributing, I can't fathom how you would come to that conclusion. The residents living in the apartments live, work, and play in the city just like anyone else. They go to restaurants, shop at stores, and bring life to the neighborhood. This in turn makes a neighborhood more appealing for renters and owners alike.

Apartments don't inherently turn into slums or hurt an area. Areas go in and out of desirability for a variety of factors, but when you build strong, desirable neighborhoods that remain that way no style of building is going to "turn the area bad". For example, Virginia Highland is filled with apartments from the days of the Ford Factory and older early 90s style garden apartments. These places still have high rents with well to do residents, because the neighborhood is nice and desirable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Downtown Marietta
1,062 posts, read 690,787 times
Reputation: 1334
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLJR View Post
@evannole

I don't understand the stigma that many seem to have with apartments. I certainly understand the desire to demand more from many of the recent developers in regards to design, facades, and perhaps retail components, but I disagree with the premise that people don't contribute to the neighborhood in the long term and (not that you said this, but I have heard it elsewhere) are destined to turn into slums.

To address your primary statement, it would be hard to argue that apartments don't wear, internal at least, more so than owner occupied residences, that's certainly natural, but there are run down single family homes, town homes, and condos all over the place. While I am sure there are bad multifamily landlords, there are also bad SFH owners. In regards to contributing, I can't fathom how you would come to that conclusion. The residents living in the apartments live, work, and play in the city just like anyone else. They go to restaurants, shop at stores, and bring life to the neighborhood. This in turn makes a neighborhood more appealing for renters and owners alike.

Apartments don't inherently turn into slums or hurt an area. Areas go in and out of desirability for a variety of factors, but when you build strong, desirable neighborhoods that remain that way no style of building is going to "turn the area bad". For example, Virginia Highland is filled with apartments from the days of the Ford Factory and older early 90s style garden apartments. These places still have high rents with well to do residents, because the neighborhood is nice and desirable.
Thank you for a very good and well thought out response. I agree with the vast bulk of your points.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Historic West End
3,960 posts, read 3,259,176 times
Reputation: 3769
Quote:
Originally Posted by evannole View Post
This may well be a good thing, but the proliferation of apartment buildings in this area concerns me a bit. They certainly are not likely to draw as many long-term residents who care and actively invest their time, money and energy into the neighborhood as dense single family houses or townhomes would. Furthermore, while these apartments may be shiny and new now, what will they be like 10, 15, 20 years from now? What kinds of tenants will they attract when they're a bit worn and tired looking?

These issues are even more salient when talking about student housing, which, by definition, has a transient resident base. And students, generally speaking, almost certainly cause greater wear-and-tear on apartments than non-student mid-to-upper income tenants.

Full disclosure: I'm a white, liberal (not that either should matter) homeowner in a gentrifying section of downtown Marietta. So, I'm interested in urban renewal but have no particular skin in this game; I'm all for the revitalization of areas near downtown Atlanta, too, but am simply concerned that adding so many apartments may not have a lasting, long-term positive effect.
The housing built in 1996 for the Olympics and then given to Georgia Tech students for housing does not support your line of thinking. The area did not decline and it's been over 20 years later.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2015, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Historic West End
3,960 posts, read 3,259,176 times
Reputation: 3769
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Pace Properties Files Plans For 144-Unit Student Housing Project Downtown | What Now Atlanta
New 144 student housing along with the numerous other projects, eg: Atlanta daily world building conversion.
Oh Yay, that is gonna look great and located across from the Market. Georgia State and Georgia Tech are really transforming the urban core of Atlanta, and another Waffle House.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top