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Old 03-23-2015, 05:03 AM
 
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I would say Castleberry Hill is already gentrified, just not in the same way as we typically see it happen in Atlanta.
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Old 03-23-2015, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
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Castleberry Hill suffers a little from being the parking lot of the Dome.
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Old 03-23-2015, 07:41 AM
 
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I have always viewed the starting point of the gentrification as the opening of independently-owned eateries that sell organic free trade coffer for more than $4 per cup, and often have at least one bagel sandwich on the menu that costs more than $12, with a target clientele being trustafarians (people living on trust funds but living a lifestyle influenced by Rastafarian culture; wealthy independently-wealthy hippies). Once such a restaurant has been successfully operating for three or four years, an Urban Outfitters opens up in order to sell clothing to the trustafarians. Because trustafarians have their basic needs taken care of, they generally don't steal or commit acts of violence, and the crime statistics become more palatable to recent college graduates with good jobs, who miss the free, liberal college atmosphere, but can afford higher housing prices. Housing prices increase to sell to these people. Eventually, these recent graduates get old, and have kids. Starbucks replaces the independently-owned eatery that started the process. By then, the housing prices will be higher, and the tax revenue in the area will be higher as well, so roads will be well-paved and schools will be good enough to send your kids to. As soon as more than 33% of the kids who grew up in the area vote for a Republican candidate, you know the gentrification process has completed.
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Old 03-23-2015, 08:05 AM
 
28,118 posts, read 24,646,505 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newlawyer2010 View Post
I have always viewed the starting point of the gentrification as the opening of independently-owned eateries that sell organic free trade coffer for more than $4 per cup, and often have at least one bagel sandwich on the menu that costs more than $12, with a target clientele being trustafarians (people living on trust funds but living a lifestyle influenced by Rastafarian culture; wealthy independently-wealthy hippies). Once such a restaurant has been successfully operating for three or four years, an Urban Outfitters opens up in order to sell clothing to the trustafarians. Because trustafarians have their basic needs taken care of, they generally don't steal or commit acts of violence, and the crime statistics become more palatable to recent college graduates with good jobs, who miss the free, liberal college atmosphere, but can afford higher housing prices. Housing prices increase to sell to these people. Eventually, these recent graduates get old, and have kids. Starbucks replaces the independently-owned eatery that started the process. By then, the housing prices will be higher, and the tax revenue in the area will be higher as well, so roads will be well-paved and schools will be good enough to send your kids to. As soon as more than 33% of the kids who grew up in the area vote for a Republican candidate, you know the gentrification process has completed.
How about hardworking young folks who want to live in the city and are willing to stick their neck out on schools and neighborhoods that have gone downhill?
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Old 03-23-2015, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
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Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
How about hardworking young folks who want to live in the city and are willing to stick their neck out on schools and neighborhoods that have gone downhill?
They're phase 2, after the urban pioneers.
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Old 03-23-2015, 11:16 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
They're phase 2, after the urban pioneers.
Although the often come in early and do most of the heavy lifting.
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Old 03-23-2015, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
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Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Although the often come in early and do most of the heavy lifting.
Someone always has to get it started.
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Old 03-23-2015, 11:57 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Black Yuppies wouldn't be differentiated from the blacks that already live in a transitional neighborhood. That's the thing. Whites in a transitioning neighborhood are almost always assumed to be the gentry. Sad truth, but it is the truth.

Making the gentrification thing about race is kinda bugging me and this is why.


Earlier I posted that the market decides when a place is gentrified.

The most important data the market uses to identify a 'worthy' investment is the following:

Median household income (2 earners are better than 1 earner)
Level of Educational Attainment

By painting gentrification with a broad brush, and discounting the affect of Black Yuppies on a transitional neighborhood, it is like saying that black people not meeting market metrics is "just a thing that has to happen".

The color of money is green. Fill neighborhoods with dual income homeowners, that have a college education, and the market follows it. Race is irrelevant to that part of the conversation.

The part of the conversation that it is relevant, is how do you bring up the existing residents to the market's desired level? If we are talking about people being disenfranchised, because people who "have more" move in, how do you ensure the disenfranchised get more for themselves as well?

That's the topic that gets danced around. People can pitch a fit because you can't be a broke high-school dropout and still live where you used to live. But that's not the real issue. What help is necessary for YOU to not be a broke high-school dropout anymore?
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Old 03-23-2015, 12:03 PM
 
1,951 posts, read 1,639,295 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Are these neighborhoods gentrifying and if so where are they in the process?

Adair Park
Beecher Hills
Benteen
Blandtown
Bolton
Boulevard Heights
Capitol View/Capitol View Manor
Castleberry Hill
Chosewood
East Atlanta
English Ave
Home Park
Howell station
Lakewood
Mozley Park
Peoplestown
Sylvan Hills
Vine City
West End
Westview
I think Home Park is sort of an odd bird in that it's renovated price/sqft is similar to gentrified areas, and definately has access to amenities, but, the housing stock is not that great, and I'm guessing a healthy chunk of it is income generating student housing that is not renovated. Sort of reminds me of Cabbagetown in a way.

Last edited by jeoff; 03-23-2015 at 12:27 PM..
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Old 03-23-2015, 04:22 PM
 
28,118 posts, read 24,646,505 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tryska View Post
Making the gentrification thing about race is kinda bugging me and this is why.


Earlier I posted that the market decides when a place is gentrified.

The most important data the market uses to identify a 'worthy' investment is the following:

Median household income (2 earners are better than 1 earner)
Level of Educational Attainment

By painting gentrification with a broad brush, and discounting the affect of Black Yuppies on a transitional neighborhood, it is like saying that black people not meeting market metrics is "just a thing that has to happen".

The color of money is green. Fill neighborhoods with dual income homeowners, that have a college education, and the market follows it. Race is irrelevant to that part of the conversation.

The part of the conversation that it is relevant, is how do you bring up the existing residents to the market's desired level? If we are talking about people being disenfranchised, because people who "have more" move in, how do you ensure the disenfranchised get more for themselves as well?

That's the topic that gets danced around. People can pitch a fit because you can't be a broke high-school dropout and still live where you used to live. But that's not the real issue. What help is necessary for YOU to not be a broke high-school dropout anymore?
Tryska,

What Atlanta neighborhood is (or has the best chance of becoming) the city's most gentrified and ethnically balanced?
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