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Old 03-21-2015, 12:11 PM
 
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So when do we say a neighborhood is gentrifying?

What are the benchmarks? Is it schools, shopping, real estate prices, demographics (age, race, family size), restaurants, safety?
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Old 03-21-2015, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
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I would say if the owners start investing in the properties.
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Old 03-21-2015, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Lake Spivey, Georgia
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Of course, "investing in properties" would also raise home prices. Maybe this is a "chicken or egg" type of question.
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Old 03-21-2015, 01:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
Of course, "investing in properties" would also raise home prices. Maybe this is a "chicken or egg" type of question.
For Oakhurst and Kirkwood, because they were close to areas that folks were priced out of ("nicer" parts of Decatur and Candler Park-Lake Claire.), folks started investing in the houses (some in Kirkwood for quite a long time). Then the business districts started to shape up. Then the schools started to improve. Oakhurst's schools had the advantage that Decatur's middle and high school were pretty much decent at the time. Also, intentional or not, I think Oakhurst's elementary school improvement was hastened more by zoning--I am pretty sure they enlarged Oakhurst's elementary school zone and added the 4th and 5th academies--this made Oakhurst a more acceptable option for even more people. This is the primary difference between Kirkwood's gentrification and Oakhurst's.---essentially all of the school improvement 4th-12th grade was already done, and the larger elementary zone--pulled in previously gentrified areas in the elementary school zone. Something similar could happen to Kirkwood if they got pulled into the possible Atlanta Druid Hills school Cluster.
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Old 03-21-2015, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
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Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
Of course, "investing in properties" would also raise home prices. Maybe this is a "chicken or egg" type of question.
I don't follow your reasoning.
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Old 03-21-2015, 03:19 PM
 
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Do y'all think there is a "tipping point" in the gentrification process?

That is, are there certain factors that have to occur before an area goes from kind-of-happening to definitely-happening?

For example, it seems to me that neighborhoods like Candler Park and O4W were sort of bumping along for a while and suddenly they changed very rapidly. What brought about the relatively sudden upsurge?
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Old 03-21-2015, 03:35 PM
 
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I see three phases in the gentrification process:

1. Gays, artists, hippies and the like move in. The neighborhoods attract them with low prices and a greater degree of acceptance for folks who are often maligned by the rest of society. Public schools matter less to these groups due to them being less likely to have kids or more likely to home school them in the case of hippies. I think East Point is a good example of a community in this phase.

2. Observers of group one move in. People who aren't a part of group one, but are open to alternative lifestyles and are attracted to perceived "hipness" in areas populated with members of group one. This group continues the trend of raising the value of housing stock and the schools start to improve. Kirkwood is a good example, in my opinion.

3. The "gentry" start moving in. Gentry refers to those "of gentle birth," born into money. This is the tipping point. The neighborhood has lost it's edge. The schools are good and housing stock has gotten so expensive many of the members of group one have moved on. Old Fourth Ward is in the earlier stages of this, with Inman Park being a matured example.
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Old 03-21-2015, 03:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Do y'all think there is a "tipping point" in the gentrification process?

That is, are there certain factors that have to occur before an area goes from kind-of-happening to definitely-happening?

For example, it seems to me that neighborhoods like Candler Park and O4W were sort of bumping along for a while and suddenly they changed very rapidly. What brought about the relatively sudden upsurge?
An area is gentrified not when the population starts to change but when the retail starts to change. An area is not gentrified if a bunch of yuppies live there but they have to leave the neighborhood to go to their quirky gastro pubs etc. because it's still just 99c stores and chicken shops. However when business owners decide that the critical mass of yuppies is in the neighborhood that yuppie oriented businesses make a good investment, then it's gentrified.

In Chicago, Logan Square is gentrified, to the west is Humboldt Park which has a ton of hipsters as well but they have to go to Logan Square to shop because in Humboldt Park most of the retail is aimed at poor Puerto Rican immigrants still. A few stores pop up here and there but they are the exception, not the rule. So while Logan Square is gentrified, Humboldt Park is gentrifying. Once it has the critical mass of amenities that you can live a yuppie lifestyle without leaving the area, it's gentrified.
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Old 03-21-2015, 04:49 PM
 
Location: O4W
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When middle class white women are walking their dogs around at 5am
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Old 03-21-2015, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joey86 View Post
I see three phases in the gentrification process:

1. Gays, artists, hippies and the like move in. The neighborhoods attract them with low prices and a greater degree of acceptance for folks who are often maligned by the rest of society. Public schools matter less to these groups due to them being less likely to have kids or more likely to home school them in the case of hippies. I think East Point is a good example of a community in this phase.

2. Observers of group one move in. People who aren't a part of group one, but are open to alternative lifestyles and are attracted to perceived "hipness" in areas populated with members of group one. This group continues the trend of raising the value of housing stock and the schools start to improve. Kirkwood is a good example, in my opinion.

3. The "gentry" start moving in. Gentry refers to those "of gentle birth," born into money. This is the tipping point. The neighborhood has lost it's edge. The schools are good and housing stock has gotten so expensive many of the members of group one have moved on. Old Fourth Ward is in the earlier stages of this, with Inman Park being a matured example.
I would say Kirkwood and O4W are at the same point. Edgewood and Reynoldstown are at point #2. Kirkwood is blowing up with families and families moving here are not looking to leave after 3rd grade. The Jackson cluster is looking strong.
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