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Old 04-08-2015, 09:20 AM
 
6,260 posts, read 5,109,161 times
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Ashton Woods Homes plans to convert the 76-acre site around the corporate headquarters of Mercedes-Benz in Sandy Springs into a mix of townhomes, apartments and retail.
Ashton Woods, which is under contract to buy the site from a local family and sell 12 acres to Mercedes-Benz USA Inc. for its new corporate campus, filed plans with Sandy Springs April 7. The development, with more than 1,000 planned housing units, would take shape on Abernathy road less than a mile west of Georgia 400.
Last year, the Mayson family put the site — including the 1920s-era Glenridge Hall — on the market, setting the stage for one of the state’s highest-profile corporate relocations and economic development coups. In January, the German luxury automaker confirmed it would relocate its U.S. headquarters from Montvale, N.J. to Sandy Springs.
Ashton Woods Homes plans New Urbanist development around Mercedes-Benz HQ (SLIDESHOW) - Atlanta Business Chronicle
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Old 04-08-2015, 09:23 AM
 
6 posts, read 6,526 times
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Which Exit on 400 is this new headquarter being built ?
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Old 04-08-2015, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
23,418 posts, read 17,576,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sid99 View Post
Which Exit on 400 is this new headquarter being built ?
Abernathy.
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Old 04-08-2015, 11:26 AM
 
29,386 posts, read 26,339,390 times
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Wow. DPZ is Andres Duany, the father of New urbanism, isn't it?
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Old 04-08-2015, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,299 posts, read 3,515,512 times
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Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Wow. DPZ is Andres Duany, the father of New urbanism, isn't it?
Absolutely, arjay57! The renderings are gorgeous...
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Old 04-09-2015, 11:10 PM
 
Location: In your feelings
2,199 posts, read 1,596,862 times
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I'll never understand how new urbanist ideas comport with building these communities as little islands disconnected from one another. My idea of something urban has streets that extend beyond the developers' property lines.

From the article:
Quote:
DPZ, an international firm based in Miami and one of the loudest voices calling for less auto-dependent development patterns in American suburbia, is designing the project.
Will this development be anything less than 100% auto-dependent? What conveyance, if not an automobile, is going to get you to this place?
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Old 04-09-2015, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,299 posts, read 3,515,512 times
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Originally Posted by magnetar View Post
Will this development be anything less than 100% auto-dependent? What conveyance, if not an automobile, is going to get you to this place?
The Sandy Springs train station is two blocks away. I'm sure there will be sidewalk improvements and countless shuttles, just like all over the district.

I worked out there for a couple of years, and there are a huge number of shuttles to & from the Dunwoody and Sandy Springs stations to the entire area.

This design isn't really 'urban' in a Midtown sense, but it looks beautiful to me.

Different strokes.
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Old 04-10-2015, 04:31 AM
 
Location: N.C. for now... Atlanta future
1,243 posts, read 1,038,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magnetar View Post
I'll never understand how new urbanist ideas comport with building these communities as little islands disconnected from one another. My idea of something urban has streets that extend beyond the developers' property lines.

From the article:


Will this development be anything less than 100% auto-dependent? What conveyance, if not an automobile, is going to get you to this place?
Building a city is something like building a puzzle. You have to make the puzzle pieces fit before a big picture emerges. The VAST MAJORITY of cities throughout human history have followed this pattern. Virtually no city, save a few, were "planned" from day one. Not Rome, not Tokyo, not Shanghai. Cities most often grow far too fast for human efforts to keep up. Most cities stumble through growth because no one can really predict how big they will get. In time the different puzzle pieces will stitch together, much like Atlanta's growth and annexations of other towns' central business districts eventually became the "core" of the now-in-Atlanta "neighborhoods." Very few cities are on a "grid." Seen on a map, Rome is a haphazard maze of streets. Some are so narrow automobiles get stuck. Rome wasn't built in a day.

Sometimes the hilarity of 200 some odd year old America thinking it knows about "urbanity" and how it comes to be (in a world of 3,500+ year old Rome and 5,000 year old Asian cities) is comical.

America's now-over 100 year period of dominance was but a speed bump in China's 5,000 years of crushing dominance.
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Old 04-10-2015, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
23,418 posts, read 17,576,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
The Sandy Springs train station is two blocks away. I'm sure there will be sidewalk improvements and countless shuttles, just like all over the district.

I worked out there for a couple of years, and there are a huge number of shuttles to & from the Dunwoody and Sandy Springs stations to the entire area.

This design isn't really 'urban' in a Midtown sense, but it looks beautiful to me.

Different strokes.
Those shuttles get stuck in the same congestion people are trying to avoid and the walk is less than pleasant when crossing a freeway interchange with speeding traffic exiting onto the street without looking for pedestrians.
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Old 04-10-2015, 08:07 AM
 
1,655 posts, read 1,741,405 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Those shuttles get stuck in the same congestion people are trying to avoid and the walk is less than pleasant when crossing a freeway interchange with speeding traffic exiting onto the street without looking for pedestrians.
It doesn't make much sense to critisize the suburbs for lacking density then critisize every step they take to gain density. They can't go directly from being built the way they are now to being a dense, urban utopia. There are steps to be taken.
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