U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-23-2008, 03:14 PM
 
849 posts, read 3,205,952 times
Reputation: 199

Advertisements

not her husband. I think I SAID that they need to use their education dollars for him to get his grad degree(s).
I also said that scientists need advanced degrees to work in their fields or related ones.
Of course no one is born with a router in his hand. At least I hope not that would hurt I was referring to formal academic education. Not everyone is suited to it and for the more artistic among us who chose to pursue subject such as English Fine Arts, etc. etc. perhaps doing hair or working with wood ARE better options for earning a living. My husband's degree is actually in non-fiction writing which was supposed to prepare him for an MA in journalism but he graduated in 1979 just when the bottom fell out of the newspaper business. He got discouraged and didn't pursue the degree. I guess no amount of education can protect against short sightedness.

pless, do you really think these generic BS's (good acronym) in business or, I love this one, Communications really lead any place but the Dilbert land cube farms? That would be fine if those were the once secure positions as portrayed in "The Apartment." If you're not familar with the movie, it takes place at a big NY insurance company and the opening scene was shot on NY Life's Main Floor. It's a gorgeous Art Deco Building but you used to walk into a sea of desks, Not even cubicles. I took an interview there once. I couldn't wait to get out. It was an amazing sight. Although they are designing the cube areas better now and there's no hidden Big brother watching from an enclosed balcony, it is the same mentality. If that doesn't kill initiative I don't know what will.

I hope if your kid doesn't show a bent for physics, you will let him do his thing, especially if it's artistic. He might just want to be a rock musician
No one said it's easy but for those who find their passion, struggle is irrelevant. I do believe as you do however, that if he is scientifically inclined he will be able to go "all the way " with it.

I speak from unfortunate experience. I was denied my either of my passions because of a very dysfunctional mother. I still have no direction in life at 61.


Quote:
Originally Posted by plessthanpointohfive View Post
You have to have a Masters to teach at a Community College. I applied for a job at the one in Athens when we first moved here. I was officially done with my degree but wasn't going to actually metriculate until December. Didn't matter. I had to have the degree in hand.

It's not a lie that degree = $. It's true quite a bit, especially in the sciences. Carpentry and the like are highly skilled fields. You can't get $$$ out of high school doing carpentry or hair. You have to have extensive training.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-23-2008, 03:28 PM
 
2,642 posts, read 7,373,881 times
Reputation: 582
I was just kidding about my son. Sorta. He already does show some artistic talen with music. He's very good at piano for his age. Certainly I would support any field he ultimately chose.

I just like to fantasize...

a generic BS is probably worse than a BS in Communications. At least with a specific field, any specific field, you can find a niche.

It's hard for kids because most of them don't get exposure to what REAL jobs are like. And, I think skilled artisans like carpenters (and cosmotologists) should be included.

My brother is dyslexic, though very bright. He couldn't "do" college. He's a barber now. But because he's in a very small town he's not making enough to support his wife and 2 kids. So, he's in tech school learning how to be some sort of machinist. It should pay pretty well - >60K.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2008, 03:52 PM
 
849 posts, read 3,205,952 times
Reputation: 199
Wink I know

you were just playing


Quote:
Originally Posted by plessthanpointohfive View Post
I was just kidding about my son. Sorta. He already does show some artistic talen with music. He's very good at piano for his age. Certainly I would support any field he ultimately chose.

I just like to fantasize...

a generic BS is probably worse than a BS in Communications. At least with a specific field, any specific field, you can find a niche.

my experience since I've been back to school pretty recently is that Comm. is pretty generic. In itself it doesn't lead to anything. Most of the Comm. majors I've known are women and they get jobs doing some sort of public relations. If theyr'e pretty and the right type, they get to be "spokespersons."

It's hard for kids because most of them don't get exposure to what REAL jobs are like. And, I think skilled artisans like carpenters (and cosmotologists) should be included.

My brother is dyslexic, though very bright. He couldn't "do" college. He's a barber now. But because he's in a very small town he's not making enough to support his wife and 2 kids. So, he's in tech school learning how to be some sort of machinist. It should pay pretty well - >60K.

Ya see what I mean

I have a grandson. who learned to read very late and he will never join a book club but he can make anything. He is exceptionally bright. I can't explain it because his mom was actually reading at 2 no exaggeration. I thought she just had an incredible memory for the stories we read? but I tested her so she had to be recognizing the words.
the other 4 kids are fine with reading and academics. My second grandson is an exceptional scholar. He's 10 and home schooled for the most part. They're all home schooled by the drop out (thanks ATL schools) genius, aka my daughter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2008, 06:38 AM
 
24 posts, read 85,200 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobKovacs View Post
Well, I hate to say it, but with majors in Early American Lit and Biology, what kind of positions were you expecting? I often wonder why people find it shocking that they can't find good jobs when they've majored in a relatively obscure field that doesn't have a direct correlation to the needs of employers.
Well I know that, but the poster said her husband has a degree in English right? Well I was telling her that that's not going to get you a job. In fact I have done Admin/Clerical work and most recently banking work since I have gotten my degree. I went to school for American Lit because I was intending to teach at the college level. I hated it, but had nothing to fall back on. Which is my fault. If I had an aptitude for math I would have become an Accountant, Engineer, etc. But alas, I am not.

As for my husband he wanted to be a lab tech or a teacher, he chose lab tech because he liked working in a lab environment. So I believe that a biology degree was all he needed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2008, 07:33 AM
 
849 posts, read 3,205,952 times
Reputation: 199
Default I think

it was the OP who has the M.A. in lit and her hubby who is the biologist. Well, see, you figured it out, Brava I don't think the OP hates it tho and with an M.A. already she CAN teach. She just has to get her gumption up and do it. They really got hit with a whammy tho' Can you imagine how it feels being given a transfer, being mentally ready to move and then being "downsized?" That's traumatic and now they are doubly jobless. I feel so bad for them.
Do you really not have the aptitude or did you get trapped by "math fear" and being told as a woman it was ok? That was my situation although at age 40 I got provisionally accepted to Georgia Tech's Building Tech. program as long as I did some math credits elsewhere. It was a crazy bureaucratic thing for transfers back then. I didn't follow thru which was my stupidity but I started the math class at Kennesaw and was surprised at how much easier "higher" math was than the basic stuff. It just synthesized in my brain. I say go for it if it's still your passion.



Quote:
Originally Posted by brightstar78 View Post
Well I know that, but the poster said her husband has a degree in English right? Well I was telling her that that's not going to get you a job. In fact I have done Admin/Clerical work and most recently banking work since I have gotten my degree. I went to school for American Lit because I was intending to teach at the college level. I hated it, but had nothing to fall back on. Which is my fault. If I had an aptitude for math I would have become an Accountant, Engineer, etc. But alas, I am not.

As for my husband he wanted to be a lab tech or a teacher, he chose lab tech because he liked working in a lab environment. So I believe that a biology degree was all he needed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2008, 10:18 AM
 
24 posts, read 85,200 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightstar78 View Post
I just posted a comment but it disappeared. The job market it NOT hot right now. I have been looking since December, and I had nothing. My husband had a job transfer approved, but he just got word that they can't have anymore people at his job and they have to lay off newbies. So it's now going to be 2 unemployed people looking for work next month.

I am trying to get enrolled into the TAPP program, but we have to wait until March before we can do anything. I am going to apply to grad school get the Ed stuff I need, and then apply that way. I am an English Major and I have a M.A in Early American lit, and it's not helping at all. My husband has a B.A in Biology so he might be able to get a critical needs job easier than myself.

Please don't come down here without a job or a plan. It is not very easy to get work down here. I have contacts and I'm still jobless. I have to take out more student loans when I go to school in order to live and probably foresee having to pay at least 75,000 back in student loans.
That's me. I posted this. I didn't like teaching English because where I taught, the kids were not only forced to take the class, most didn't want to be there. But I am willing to do it now in order to go to school to be the media specialist I should have gone and done (they're hiring for this position and I could kick myself).

My husband got down here just got his paperwork in and now they are saying that there are too many people in his department and since he just transferred down here he's considered "new", so he is one of the new guys to go. He hadn't even been in his job for a good month. We are down here already in Georgia. We are staying with friends, and were waiting for our apartment to be finished to move in. Now we are hit with this news. His job is being eliminated effective February. So we're getting one more paycheck, and then that's it. Thank God we are staying with friends.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2008, 10:33 AM
 
387 posts, read 1,442,993 times
Reputation: 112
Communications schools include majors like advertising, journalism, radio/tv, etc. While the entry level jobs aren't always the highest paying, degrees in these majors are more versatile than a general business degree (in my opinion). I'm not saying that I'm offended by some of the replies here, but I have a B.S. and an M.S. from a j-school... and at 24, I'm doing pretty well (salary wise). While I understand the perception that "communications" majors are just young, pretty girls who get jobs because of their looks, if you have a comm. degree from a well respected jschool like Grady (uga), florida, texas (all of which are esteemed research schools), you'll have a lucrative career.


As for 'English' majors... well, that one I don't understand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2008, 11:18 AM
 
849 posts, read 3,205,952 times
Reputation: 199
Default you're right, sorry

that came across wrong. I think I was trying to say that that is the perception but you also mentioned your Master's. That's what my hubby was told. That he needed one preferably from J-school, to have a decent career with his writing degree. You are also right that the are better than general business degs. At least in Communications you are working towards a specialization. When my ex., with a BA in econ from a top private Uni went to Pitt for an MBA, they had initiated a new program. This was 1967. The called it "interdisciplinary." when he had paid his dues to Uncle Sam for being in ROTC he found out that all that time and money were a waste because companies wanted specific concentrations. He started lower than if he had gone right into corporate life after his BA. He heard that his entire career until he finally gave up and used all his veterans/reservist points to work for the IRS

Specialization is getting to be a necessity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mg83 View Post
Communications schools include majors like advertising, journalism, radio/tv, etc. While the entry level jobs aren't always the highest paying, degrees in these majors are more versatile than a general business degree (in my opinion). I'm not saying that I'm offended by some of the replies here, but I have a B.S. and an M.S. from a j-school... and at 24, I'm doing pretty well (salary wise). While I understand the perception that "communications" majors are just young, pretty girls who get jobs because of their looks, if you have a comm. degree from a well respected jschool like Grady (uga), florida, texas (all of which are esteemed research schools), you'll have a lucrative career.


As for 'English' majors... well, that one I don't understand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2008, 01:23 PM
 
3,647 posts, read 4,757,997 times
Reputation: 5786
What positions and areas of town do you consider hot?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2008, 03:27 PM
 
Location: West Cobb (formerly Vinings)
3,615 posts, read 6,503,056 times
Reputation: 814
Also, job growth is also expected to outpace population growth for the next 30 years in metro Atlanta.

Quote:
Originally Posted by antiquesmountainapache View Post
What positions and areas of town do you consider hot?
By "hot", do you mean improving areas that are good for real estate speculation or areas that are considered really nice to live already that were improved years ago?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:15 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top