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Old 09-15-2015, 04:23 PM
 
23 posts, read 29,473 times
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Originally Posted by Atlgirl2015 View Post
We already have one reference for Haygood but I wasn't that impressed, maybe it's seen better days? I'm definitely interested in the one on the Emory campus, didn't realize they had something like that. We are actually looking for less church oriented preschools and more feeder schools for the top k-12 schools. Have you heard anything about the program at Paideia?
Paideia has a 5 day a week, half-day program for 3-5 year olds. Tuition is approximately 12K per year. Unlike the other local pre-schools where you sign up and either register or put your name on a wait list, Paideia requires a full-on admissions process which is extremely competitive. You need to apply October-January of the year before you wish your child to attend. So if he is 2.5 now and you want him to start August 2016 you would need to begin the process this fall. The process involves an application, parent interview and student observation typically with other children who are applying. Your child will most likely be competing with kids who have already spent a year or two in a church-based pre-school or daycare.

Haygood church is currently undergoing a major renovation to the building, so I can only imagine that it may be affecting the pre-school adversely.
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Old 09-15-2015, 06:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by GoingGrey View Post
Paideia has a 5 day a week, half-day program for 3-5 year olds. Tuition is approximately 12K per year. Unlike the other local pre-schools where you sign up and either register or put your name on a wait list, Paideia requires a full-on admissions process which is extremely competitive. You need to apply October-January of the year before you wish your child to attend. So if he is 2.5 now and you want him to start August 2016 you would need to begin the process this fall. The process involves an application, parent interview and student observation typically with other children who are applying. Your child will most likely be competing with kids who have already spent a year or two in a church-based pre-school or daycare.

Haygood church is currently undergoing a major renovation to the building, so I can only imagine that it may be affecting the pre-school adversely.
My son actually just turned 1, we are just getting a head start on the process because we have a lot going on and I wanted to be able to take my time and visit plenty of places before making a decision. Where we are from, wait lists for preschool are typically about a year or longer. Paideia sounds like something we would be interested in pursuing a little bit later, thanks for the info on it! And yes, it looks like there's a lot happening at Haygood but it also seemed like a lot of kids for one teacher? Maybe someone called in sick? Who knows.
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Old 09-15-2015, 07:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
Our son goes to Peachtree Presbyterian and we love it. Not too far from you. They do tours all the time, but it's pre-scheduled. I don't know if they will just do a tour whenever.

BUT...if you're looking for deep academic immersion, that ain't your place. It's a Reggio Emilia program, so it's based around the child leading the activities and learning based on his own interests. Granted, he's not even three and a half, and he can count to 1,000, read, and write, and tests at about a 15-year-old vocabulary level, but those are mostly from his own self-taught learning. He goes to school for fun and to learn socializing. We'll worry about getting him into a top college later in life. This young is the time to be a kid.

But, different strokes....

Oh, and yes...wait lists definitely happen. We were trying to get into St. Anne's on Northside/Moore's Mill, but people sign up there before they're even pregnant. It's tough to get in there.
Great, we have plenty of time as my son just turned 1, so i figure we will be able to catch a few tours in various areas. I had looked into Waldorf and was very so-so about it, but I haven't checked out Reggio Emilia. I'm not adverse to play based learning but we are looking for a school where he can get a solid heads tart on things that I can't teach (third language) or might not have the time to when our second one is born. We currently do a lot of class based activities together like Kindermusik and he thrives off of that more than just running around the playground (though I make sure we get a lot of that in as well with his baby friends).We also have found from informal polling amongst friends who have gone through the process in NY and LA that education based schools have a lower teacher-student ratio and more stimulating activities. We are willing to invest in a quality head start that will be an asset later and if we have to move again for some reason before kindergarten, we need to make sure that our son will be able to keep up with his peers out of state.

Last edited by Atlgirl2015; 09-15-2015 at 07:28 PM..
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Old 09-15-2015, 07:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CMMom View Post
Goddard is a full-day, day-care program more like Kinder-Care. That's probably not what you are looking for.

Peachtree Pres, Peachtree Rd. UMC, and St. Anne's are among the top feeder schools for the Buckhead privates.
Thanks, we will look into those!
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Old 09-16-2015, 06:54 AM
 
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Advice-giving on a forum like this is often merely an opportunity for self-congratulation and the expression of unexamined biases. With that caveat...

Direct instruction of 'academics' to 2, 3, and 4 year olds is generally less helpful for their development than play, exploration, and socialization. Perhaps counter-intuitively, the best ways to improve a child's literacy and numeracy in elementary school is NOT to focus on teaching them letters and numbers in pre-school (you don't have to avoid it; it just shouldn't be a focus).

Look, I'm all for cognitive development. I'm a professor, my wife's got a PhD, our kids do extra math almost every day. But there is little that is better for cognitive development in children than play. It's remarkably complicated...it's hardly frivolous. Oh, and it's a lot more fun for the kids.
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Old 09-17-2015, 06:58 AM
 
1,685 posts, read 1,670,612 times
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Originally Posted by atl parent View Post
Advice-giving on a forum like this is often merely an opportunity for self-congratulation and the expression of unexamined biases. With that caveat...

Direct instruction of 'academics' to 2, 3, and 4 year olds is generally less helpful for their development than play, exploration, and socialization. Perhaps counter-intuitively, the best ways to improve a child's literacy and numeracy in elementary school is NOT to focus on teaching them letters and numbers in pre-school (you don't have to avoid it; it just shouldn't be a focus).

Look, I'm all for cognitive development. I'm a professor, my wife's got a PhD, our kids do extra math almost every day. But there is little that is better for cognitive development in children than play. It's remarkably complicated...it's hardly frivolous. Oh, and it's a lot more fun for the kids.
Exactly this. My kid's Reggio preschool is thoroughly pedagogical about the way it lets the children play and discover. It's super-educated teachers are philosophical about the way they ask questions to the children and open up avenues for exploration for them--but none of it is at a table in front of a piece of paper. My son thrived and was totally ready for Westminster when he got there--and ready did not mean he'd been drilled down on a bunch of facts/letters/numbers.

When he started pre first, he could count and measure and divide because he'd built things and planned construction projects with his friends.

He knew his letter sounds, but he couldn't read. What he could do was ask good questions about the world around him, stand up and explain a project he was working on. How sand behaves differently from water, how it behaves the same. How his body moves in space and what makes a shadow.

It pains me when I hear new parents speak about wanting an academic preschool so their children won't be behind.

Academics forced on 2 and 3 and 4 year olds are basically fun parlor tricks but don't help the children's development. Play does that.
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Old 09-17-2015, 02:53 PM
 
71 posts, read 41,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlJan View Post
Exactly this. My kid's Reggio preschool is thoroughly pedagogical about the way it lets the children play and discover. It's super-educated teachers are philosophical about the way they ask questions to the children and open up avenues for exploration for them--but none of it is at a table in front of a piece of paper. My son thrived and was totally ready for Westminster when he got there--and ready did not mean he'd been drilled down on a bunch of facts/letters/numbers.

When he started pre first, he could count and measure and divide because he'd built things and planned construction projects with his friends.

He knew his letter sounds, but he couldn't read. What he could do was ask good questions about the world around him, stand up and explain a project he was working on. How sand behaves differently from water, how it behaves the same. How his body moves in space and what makes a shadow.

It pains me when I hear new parents speak about wanting an academic preschool so their children won't be behind.

Academics forced on 2 and 3 and 4 year olds are basically fun parlor tricks but don't help the children's development. Play does that.
Like I mentioned above, I'm not opposed to play-based learning, as long as there is actual, you know, learning going on. Obviously no toddler is going to be sitting around learning the multiplication tables for hours on end or reading novels, so let's all get back down to earth and recognize that when we are talking about a more academic environment, we are talking about lots of stimulating, and guided activities appropriate for young kids so they can count, tell you the sky is blue, recognize a square from a triangle, and generally love learning. And what's the harm in wanting your child to being exposed to a third or fourth language? I grew up bilingual, and my cousins in Europe all speak 3-4 languages as well. I also went into kindergarten knowing the alphabet and my numbers, as did my husband, and we want the same for our child. There's also nothing wrong with wanting to make sure your child has a good foundation for starting school if we need to move, I don't mean to shock anyone but GA schools (including the private ones) aren't exactly the best. I am extremely hands on with my son because I see that he genuinely enjoys learning new things, but with a second baby on the way, I just won't be able to attend every single Kindermusik class or spend as much time as I do now in building block towers for hours on end or heading to the aquarium to touch the fish. I want an environment for my son that will mimic what I do at home with him, and more. I went to one daycare, a Waldorf one, and I'm sure that some parents are okay with their kids digging in the dirt aimlessly or wandering around looking bored as a teacher mumbles some nonsense about fairies making night time fall, but that's not what we are looking for. To each his own, so please save feeling pained for more important things in life.

Last edited by Atlgirl2015; 09-17-2015 at 03:16 PM..
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:32 PM
 
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Since you've got it all figured out, I'm surprised you're asking random Georgia dummies on the Internet for advice
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Old 09-18-2015, 07:01 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Atlgirl2015 View Post
To each his own, so please save feeling pained for more important things in life.
Childhood isn't one of the more important things in life?
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Old 09-18-2015, 07:05 AM
 
445 posts, read 356,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlgirl2015 View Post
I also went into kindergarten knowing the alphabet and my numbers, as did my husband, and we want the same for our child.

I went to one daycare, a Waldorf one, and I'm sure that some parents are okay with their kids digging in the dirt aimlessly or wandering around looking bored as a teacher mumbles some nonsense about fairies making night time fall, but that's not what we are looking for. To each his own, so please save feeling pained for more important things in life.
I think that a child would learn the alphabet and numbers in most any preschool and pre-K. Waldorf might be the one exception, but those kids seem to learn in due time. "Digging in dirt aimlessly" sounds great to me, but I unfortunately can't afford the Waldorf tuition.
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