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Old 09-20-2015, 03:43 PM
bu2
 
8,975 posts, read 5,670,985 times
Reputation: 3540

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tryska View Post
So what I don't understand is why people are so intent on enforcing that South Fulton is "never going to improve". Why is that such a vested position for y'all? Like what purpose does it serve YOU specifically to try to discount a large swath of the city, like there is no hope of possibility of improvement? That's what I would like to know, because it always seems to be the same people doing it.

And for what it's worth development is ALREADY happening in the south and west, whether you "agree" with that or not.
Its called realism.

It may well improve, but its not going to transform with a mass of new homes and redevelopment. Maybe you get more apartment complexes, primarily near MARTA. But its not going to be the "next big thing." Change is gradual. And it tends to creep from existing good areas, not jump all over the place. Developers take risks, but not outrageous risks.
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Old 09-20-2015, 03:53 PM
 
1,979 posts, read 1,700,881 times
Reputation: 1244
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Its called realism.

It may well improve, but its not going to transform with a mass of new homes and redevelopment. Maybe you get more apartment complexes, primarily near MARTA. But its not going to be the "next big thing." Change is gradual. And it tends to creep from existing good areas, not jump all over the place. Developers take risks, but not outrageous risks.

What's funny is that in my 4 block neighborhood, there are already 3 new infill developer homes, and a custom home going up across the street. In another neighborhood adequately covered by several agents, homes are listed and under contract to well-qualified people within the week. On the other side of town by Camp Creek a whole slew of market rate garden apartments are almost (if not fully) completed online behind the MarketPlace.

Add to that 2 TOD projects, a major GDOT streetscaping project along Main, new commercial and hospitality projects, a new mellow mushroom, along with other new restaurants that have moved in to existing spaces, I would say you are making a lot of assumptions on what you "think" will happen, as opposed to what is ALREADY happening.

And that mentioned above doesn't include the pipeline projects, only some of which I am privy to, or upcoming Ft. Mac development.

My point with all this, is that as the economy continues improving and real estate keeps warming up, the logical progression is to fill in what is still value land ITP (to the South) and close to MARTA and OTP in proximity to the airport.

You can disagree all you want, but again, it isn't stopping it from being current reality. You are just behind the curve by 2-3 years.
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Old 09-20-2015, 04:58 PM
 
Location: n/a
1,189 posts, read 734,595 times
Reputation: 1334
Would love for tri-cities and the hoods from Conley to Cascade be the next big thing.

And being "behind the curves" isn't all bad unless like bubu you're lightyears away!
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Old 09-20-2015, 05:18 PM
 
631 posts, read 1,026,315 times
Reputation: 632
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tryska View Post
What's funny is that in my 4 block neighborhood, there are already 3 new infill developer homes, and a custom home going up across the street. In another neighborhood adequately covered by several agents, homes are listed and under contract to well-qualified people within the week. On the other side of town by Camp Creek a whole slew of market rate garden apartments are almost (if not fully) completed online behind the MarketPlace.

Add to that 2 TOD projects, a major GDOT streetscaping project along Main, new commercial and hospitality projects, a new mellow mushroom, along with other new restaurants that have moved in to existing spaces, I would say you are making a lot of assumptions on what you "think" will happen, as opposed to what is ALREADY happening.

And that mentioned above doesn't include the pipeline projects, only some of which I am privy to, or upcoming Ft. Mac development.

My point with all this, is that as the economy continues improving and real estate keeps warming up, the logical progression is to fill in what is still value land ITP (to the South) and close to MARTA and OTP in proximity to the airport.

You can disagree all you want, but again, it isn't stopping it from being current reality. You are just behind the curve by 2-3 years.

I love to hear that! Why wouldn't South Fulton develop? It's a huge swath of cheap, undeveloped land that's very close to the city, has interstate and marta access, and is relatively close to employment centers. It's only a matter of time.

Will S. Fulton be the next Perimeter? Probably not. The money and corporate presence will probably always stay on the northside, but they will get their slice of the pie. If Porsche decided to take a risk and move their headquarters down there, what's stopping other companies from doing the same?
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Old 09-20-2015, 05:25 PM
 
1,546 posts, read 2,542,202 times
Reputation: 617
Quote:
Originally Posted by lastminutemom View Post
I think a lot of areas took a hit at the recession that were just on the cusp of becoming "something." And with the recession has come lots of doubts about home ownership in general, and job woes for the generation that might be the target market for these communities, and thus the recovery in these areas have been slow.

At some point, for some people, price and location will trump everything else in terms of home purchases.

This was on NPR this week. About how, for may people, their options from a price stand point are becoming increasingly more limited within ATL city limits.
Could you please post the link to the NPR story?
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Old 09-20-2015, 05:38 PM
 
1,546 posts, read 2,542,202 times
Reputation: 617
Quote:
Originally Posted by magnetar View Post
I'm not sure why so many people are splitting hairs over what's considered "southern" when clearly the OP is referring to actual intown CoA as the "southern" part of the Atlanta metro area. As opposed to the northern suburbs. And thus the answer is obviously "yes," Atlanta's most interesting residential, restaurant, and retail developments are all happening in and around the Beltline. Fortunately more of an effort is being made to include housing for existing residents, so it won't be completely gentrified and out of reach for working class people. In Reynoldstown, the Beltline and other city agencies are bringing affordable senior housing to a prime location right near the Beltline. That's the way to ensure the city of Atlanta remains diverse even as property values continue to climb.
Sorry, I'm actually referring to neighborhoods between Grant Park (SE) and Westview (SW) -- the southern beltline neighborhoods.

Adair Park
Capitol View
Capitol View Manor
High Point Estates
Oakland City
Mechanicsville
Peoplestown
Pittsburgh
Sylvan Hills
The Villages at Carver
Westview

I know its a longer way off, but i'd also be interested to hear about on the Westside

Ashview Heights
Bankhead
Hunter Hills
Just Us
Mozley Park
Washington Park
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Old 09-20-2015, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Valdosta (Atlanta Native)
3,444 posts, read 2,821,201 times
Reputation: 2148
There's no logical evidence that the amenities in the south metro are worse than the north.
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Old 09-20-2015, 06:40 PM
bu2
 
8,975 posts, read 5,670,985 times
Reputation: 3540
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tryska View Post
What's funny is that in my 4 block neighborhood, there are already 3 new infill developer homes, and a custom home going up across the street. In another neighborhood adequately covered by several agents, homes are listed and under contract to well-qualified people within the week. On the other side of town by Camp Creek a whole slew of market rate garden apartments are almost (if not fully) completed online behind the MarketPlace.

Add to that 2 TOD projects, a major GDOT streetscaping project along Main, new commercial and hospitality projects, a new mellow mushroom, along with other new restaurants that have moved in to existing spaces, I would say you are making a lot of assumptions on what you "think" will happen, as opposed to what is ALREADY happening.

And that mentioned above doesn't include the pipeline projects, only some of which I am privy to, or upcoming Ft. Mac development.

My point with all this, is that as the economy continues improving and real estate keeps warming up, the logical progression is to fill in what is still value land ITP (to the South) and close to MARTA and OTP in proximity to the airport.

You can disagree all you want, but again, it isn't stopping it from being current reality. You are just behind the curve by 2-3 years.
There were some new home developments starting at 350-400k near Camp Creek 7-10 years ago. There were also neighborhoods nearby with nearly every 4th home boarded up. There were a few isolated developments where Black professionals moved. That doesn't mean the whole neighborhood was re-developing.

There are typical patterns of redevelopment. Virginia Highlands and Druid Hills get expensive and Candler Park gets hot and people improve homes there. That gets expensive and Kirkwood and East Lake start to get stronger. Schools always are a hindrance.

Redevelopment is slow in Atlanta because of strict zoning and reluctance to change. People resist changes in the character of their neighborhood. When you have existing SFH, its difficult. There's only so much land completely vacant. Its easier when you have underutilized industrial or retail property or old apartments. You have had that in midtown and Inman Park.
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Old 09-20-2015, 06:48 PM
 
246 posts, read 208,154 times
Reputation: 258
I'm late to the party, but the whole notion of "up and coming" on the South side as far as families are concerned (NOT singles--totally different demographic with totally different needs) has much to do with schools and secondly, business.

The reason people even give historic College Park and East Point a second blink, and the reason the price point is what it is in certain areas, is the proximity to Woodward Academy, and secondly, to major employers like DELTA, FAA, Porsche, and on and on. Period. Prices are higher in historic College Park and parts of East Point for a reason. Take just Woodward Academy away, and what do you think would happen, seriously? Families would commute to work from Fayette or Coweta County and send their kids to those schools. Many already do.

The outer areas of East Point, College Park, Riverdale, much of Clayton, etc., unfortunately, are going to have to figure out a way to attract families in order to be sustainable. Large employers, I would think, are a major start. The North side has this, which explains the accelerated growth there. I personally don't like that the south side has been left in the dust this way, but it just is.
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Old 09-20-2015, 07:00 PM
 
1,979 posts, read 1,700,881 times
Reputation: 1244
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
There were some new home developments starting at 350-400k near Camp Creek 7-10 years ago. There were also neighborhoods nearby with nearly every 4th home boarded up. There were a few isolated developments where Black professionals moved. That doesn't mean the whole neighborhood was re-developing.

There are typical patterns of redevelopment. Virginia Highlands and Druid Hills get expensive and Candler Park gets hot and people improve homes there. That gets expensive and Kirkwood and East Lake start to get stronger. Schools always are a hindrance.

Redevelopment is slow in Atlanta because of strict zoning and reluctance to change. People resist changes in the character of their neighborhood. When you have existing SFH, its difficult. There's only so much land completely vacant. Its easier when you have underutilized industrial or retail property or old apartments. You have had that in midtown and Inman Park.
East Point has underutilized industrial, retail and old apartments as well. One complex is currently on the market, an artists cooperative took over a large industrial building and is currently expanding, and one of the worst neighborhoods around here is actually starting to see people buy and rehab. This is quite simply how revitalization works. Why you would think it is impossible on the Southside is beyond me, and some of your comments lead me to believe you haven't actually been down here lately. or maybe even ever.
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