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Old 09-21-2015, 05:04 PM
 
6,795 posts, read 6,589,949 times
Reputation: 5411

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It's race and class. Don't let people fool you into thinking it's just "class". Yeah right. I used to be it was just class too, but more I've looked around and duh deeper, more I realized it's pre-conceived perceptions about blacks all around, no matter if your poor or affluent.
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Old 09-21-2015, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,244 posts, read 4,375,674 times
Reputation: 2723
Clayton County's reputation isn't completely unjustified. I think people take it too far, the stereotype. There are plenty of places I would live in Clayco. But this didn't develop overnight...

Large swaths of the county were doomed by design. Large areas are chock full of poorly designed/cheap starter homes. Then you have tons of apartments, which isn't always optimal. Most companies do not keep up with properties plus everyone wants newer and better. So you have large portions of the county that are just not going to stand up to the test of time, thanks to bad developers and poor zoning.

Then you have the loss of school accreditation. That was huge, a total embarrassment for the county. That is a rep you do not shake in a quick amount of time, and rightfully so.

Then you see the willingness in the voters of Clayco to vote in a bat-s#!% crazy sheriff...twice.

In my opinion, the reputation isn't unwarranted. But people do take it to far
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Old 09-21-2015, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Valdosta (Atlanta Native)
3,442 posts, read 2,817,865 times
Reputation: 2148
Quote:
Originally Posted by tikigod311 View Post
Clayton County's reputation isn't completely unjustified. I think people take it too far, the stereotype. There are plenty of places I would live in Clayco. But this didn't develop overnight...

Large swaths of the county were doomed by design. Large areas are chock full of poorly designed/cheap starter homes. Then you have tons of apartments, which isn't always optimal. Most companies do not keep up with properties plus everyone wants newer and better. So you have large portions of the county that are just not going to stand up to the test of time, thanks to bad developers and poor zoning.

Then you have the loss of school accreditation. That was huge, a total embarrassment for the county. That is a rep you do not shake in a quick amount of time, and rightfully so.

Then you see the willingness in the voters of Clayco to vote in a bat-s#!% crazy sheriff...twice.

In my opinion, the reputation isn't unwarranted. But people do take it to far
Old housing can always be redeveloped. Take the older areas of Cobb county for example. There are also some of the greatest designed neighborhoods like Forest Park which can easily be made urban with infill. Also Morrow with it's citywide walking trails. Other than the rushed developments of the 90s-00s Clayton's housing stock is pretty good with marvels such as Lake Spivey, Mundys Mill, and the Panhandle.
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Old 09-21-2015, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Wandering in the Dothraki sea
1,342 posts, read 1,211,705 times
Reputation: 3227
Is Old National technically Clayton? Because that's probably one area that definitely lives up to the reputation
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Old 09-21-2015, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Valdosta (Atlanta Native)
3,442 posts, read 2,817,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JC84 View Post
Is Old National technically Clayton? Because that's probably one area that definitely lives up to the reputation
No it's not Clayton this is one of the ignorant things you hear from people that don't live in South Atlanta.
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Old 09-21-2015, 08:10 PM
 
478 posts, read 583,381 times
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There have been a number of comments posted here regarding the demographics of Clayton County and an implication that there has been recent white flight out of the county. Some perspective is needed.

First of all, according to Census Bureau data found on Wikipedia, in the 2010 Census, the racial makeup of the County was as follows:
White: 18.9%
African American: 66.7%
Hispanic: 13.7%

This compares with the 2000 Census when whites were 37.94%; blacks were 51.55% and Hispanics were 7.5%.

So in the last 15 years, the number or percentage of whites has been cut in half, while the number of blacks and Hispanics has continued to grow. In the big picture, it has been almost 25 years since Clayton had a white majority for their to have been white flight to occur in the first place. From what I can tell, it seems that there may not have been the quick movement of whites out of Clayton which occurred in the 1950's and 60's in SW Atlanta and later in the 70's in Southeast DeKalb. Instead as the normal process occurs where 20% of the population moves every year, when whites moved from Clayton to other parts of the country due to a new job, or as they got older, to an assisted living facility, they were not replaced by other whites, but instead blacks bought their homes.

The initial change in demographics most likely occurred in the numerous 1960 era apartments which line Tara Blvd. and other major thoroughfares. As the apartments aged rents began to fall and as a result, a lower income population and this population included a large number of blacks. The demographics of the local schools began to change and the test scores of the schools began to decline as the schools had a larger number of lower income, transient students from the apartments. At the same time, there was a decline in the number of children form the single family homes as many became empty nesters. So, the final result was the homeowners faced declining home values due to the low ratings of the neighborhood schools.

All of this was unfolding as the larger demographic changes were changing to the north of Clayton. SW Atlanta had become majority black and by the late 1970's, the East Point and College Park. This demographic transformation kept moving south into Clayton County.

To put things in a larger perspective, Clayton County, even in the early 1960's, when it was over 90% white, was not similar to the northern suburbs like Sandy Springs or the Northlake Area of DeKalb which had large populations of college educated professionals. Clayton, instead, had a large blue collar population who worked at the Airport for the airlines (often in aircraft maintenance) or the former Ford plant (where Porsche now has its HQ). There were some higher income pockets like Lake Spivey, but they were more the exception to the rule.

As far as those commenters who have hopes that gentrification will take place in Clayton as has been seen in parts of the City of Atlanta, this is not that likely to occur. Why? Because most of the gentrification which has occurred in Intown areas has happened because of what I call the tailgate effect where there are buyers who desire to live in an area like Virginia Highlands, or Druid Hills, but can't afford it, so they would move into the neighborhood immediately to the south (like Kirkwood or O4W) where they could buy homes for a fraction of the cost. In the early 1990's, there were whites who bought old houses in Kirkwood for less than $50K and fixed them up and they're now worth a fortune.

By contrast, in Clayton County, it is hard to see the nearby, upscale, neighborhood which would serve as a catalyst for gentrification to occur. Overall, given the national income trends, of wages and incomes being stagnant, it is hard to see much catalyst for a large amount of appreciation in real estate which would fuel such a phenomenon/

As to the original posters comment of people whom he has heard who make comments of being afraid just to drive through the County, in all probably they have little reason to, other than as a pass though on their way to and from Florida. This is not to single out Clayton, it is true for most of Metro Atlanta, as every part of the area has most of the retail and restaurants their residents desire close by. The only thing that is different is that higher end retail (which can't be found elsewhere) is in Buckhead and those shoppers who desire to shop there will drive there regardless of where they live. The same is true of higher end non-chain restaurants found in Intown locations.
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Old 09-21-2015, 09:02 PM
 
12,906 posts, read 20,974,770 times
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https://abagond.wordpress.com/2010/1...ace-its-class/
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Old 09-21-2015, 09:49 PM
 
95 posts, read 95,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David1502 View Post
As to the original posters comment of people whom he has heard who make comments of being afraid just to drive through the County, in all probably they have little reason to, other than as a pass though on their way to and from Florida. This is not to single out Clayton, it is true for most of Metro Atlanta, as every part of the area has most of the retail and restaurants their residents desire close by. The only thing that is different is that higher end retail (which can't be found elsewhere) is in Buckhead and those shoppers who desire to shop there will drive there regardless of where they live. The same is true of higher end non-chain restaurants found in Intown locations.
Having little reason to drive through an area is VERY different from saying you are afraid to drive through an area. I have little reason to drive through some northern counties but that doesn't mean I'm AFRAID to drive through them.

I also personally think there is some hope for gentrification even in areas of Clayton that don't have much historical charm or value. Reason? Location location location. Eventually I think even wealthier people will tire of their 1.5+ hour rush hour urban sprawl commutes to Atlanta.
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Old 09-22-2015, 04:40 AM
 
Location: Valdosta (Atlanta Native)
3,442 posts, read 2,817,865 times
Reputation: 2148
Even though Gentrification is nice, it isn't needed. Like stated before Clayton has always been a blue collar county and that doesn't need to change. What we need most is jobs and redevelopment. When we up the income of the citizens who want to work then we can attract more retail which in turn will bring more professional jobs. Jobs is exactly what Clayton is working on too. Take Fort Gillem, and the Tri-cities initiative which will lower taxes for business that come here.
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Old 09-22-2015, 06:52 AM
 
1,756 posts, read 4,918,634 times
Reputation: 548
Blame Cobb County
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