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Old 11-01-2017, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,468 posts, read 7,447,268 times
Reputation: 4237

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Quote:
Originally Posted by primaltech View Post
Malls are an outdated concept. The land is probably worth more than the mall. They should tear it down and replace it with a large mixed use development, with retail shopping but also with mid-rise residential and whatnot. Like Avalon.

Same for Gwinnett Place. And heck, all the low-rise, indoor shopping malls from the 20th century. But start with the ones that are clearly failing and dead.
Well Malls aren't completely dying...

What is going on here is well beyond the typical rise of amazon and decline of malls.

Gwinnett has one of the highest ratios of retail square footage per capita in its market area and in the South really.

The Forum and The Shoppes (previously Avenue) in Peacthree Corners and Snelleville already built niche outdoor shopping developments. Two more mall exist in Gwinnett. They are built closer to the county's traditional suburban wealth that is located further from I-85.

Gwinnett Place also has a large concentration of apartments, which are aging at this point. So it is at a low-point on the shifting demographic life-cycle and will likely see improvement within 15-20 years.

Overall, the Mall can go away. We don't even need to replace most of the retail. There is too much retail square footage in the whole area and that is the problem. What I do care about is the area, which is actually doing a bit better lately. What the area really needs is a better balance of jobs. It is the best connected place in the county via local roads and well connected to North Fulton and I-85/316, but it has lost out to most development that went towards Sugarloaf.

What is worth saving is the Macy's, Sears, and Megamart if it can fit into whatever new development could be built. They are actually self-owned and contained building separate from mall itself.
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Old 11-02-2017, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
22 posts, read 14,307 times
Reputation: 25
Myself and another local business owner, met with Northlake Mall in August. We met with mall management as well as the folks over redevelopment for the owners. Our meeting's purpose was for me to present them with a residential real estate market report for the surrounding neighborhoods.

I can't share many details from the meeting, but I can tell you that things are progressing well behind the scenes. Like you, I was concerned about the lack of public announcements and wondered if plans had stalled or been cancelled. I was pleased to learn about all they have been doing to build lines of communication with the county planning department, and lining up tenants. I've witnessed many redevelopments be cancelled or fall short of their promises, I believe this one will likely deliver.

Basically, all the rumors that swirl around are true. The property will no longer be a mall, it will instead be a mixed-use development heavily focused on medical with some office and retail. It will NOT be an Avalon or Atlantic Station style mixed-use. The retail will be focused along Briarcliff Road (where Fork in the Road and MensWearhouse are now). Some retailers will be relocating to the new development and there will be news about the Sears buildings.

They expect to make announcements in the first half of 2018. While it's not as fast as we would hope, they are taking the time to do this right. Due to several aspects of the project, it should be a catalyst for future commercial redevelopment in the area.
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Old 11-02-2017, 04:12 PM
 
13,146 posts, read 21,446,604 times
Reputation: 4259
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLectric View Post
Myself and another local business owner, met with Northlake Mall in August. We met with mall management as well as the folks over redevelopment for the owners. Our meeting's purpose was for me to present them with a residential real estate market report for the surrounding neighborhoods.

I can't share many details from the meeting, but I can tell you that things are progressing well behind the scenes. Like you, I was concerned about the lack of public announcements and wondered if plans had stalled or been cancelled. I was pleased to learn about all they have been doing to build lines of communication with the county planning department, and lining up tenants. I've witnessed many redevelopments be cancelled or fall short of their promises, I believe this one will likely deliver.

Basically, all the rumors that swirl around are true. The property will no longer be a mall, it will instead be a mixed-use development heavily focused on medical with some office and retail. It will NOT be an Avalon or Atlantic Station style mixed-use. The retail will be focused along Briarcliff Road (where Fork in the Road and MensWearhouse are now). Some retailers will be relocating to the new development and there will be news about the Sears buildings.

They expect to make announcements in the first half of 2018. While it's not as fast as we would hope, they are taking the time to do this right. Due to several aspects of the project, it should be a catalyst for future commercial redevelopment in the area.
Will the other, functioning department stores remain?
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Old 11-02-2017, 04:52 PM
 
8,010 posts, read 9,859,187 times
Reputation: 5959
How, exactly, do medical offices serve as a catlyst for growth?
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Old 11-02-2017, 04:59 PM
 
28,633 posts, read 25,417,911 times
Reputation: 9884
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
How, exactly, do medical offices serve as a catlyst for growth?
Look at the areas around Pill Hill, Emory and Piedmont.
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Old 11-02-2017, 06:30 PM
 
2,252 posts, read 1,277,118 times
Reputation: 1563
Malls can still succeed if done right.
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Old 11-02-2017, 08:36 PM
 
8,010 posts, read 9,859,187 times
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Yeah, I just don't buy it. You know what other mall is surrounded by medical offices? Greenbriar.
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Old 11-02-2017, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
22 posts, read 14,307 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
How, exactly, do medical offices serve as a catlyst for growth?
The catalyst for growth I was referencing are the retailers that will relocate to the redeveloped mall. They will leave behind at least one current development that will likely then be redeveloped, hopefully starting a chain reaction of redevelopments.

How do medical offices serve as a catalyst? Simple, medical offices provide jobs with decent wages. One thing Northlake could use, and something planned in Northlake Mall's redevelopment is sit-down restaurants. Medical employees will help support lunch business for the restaurants. Without a strong lunch business, restaurants struggle to do well.
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Old 11-03-2017, 11:31 AM
 
8,010 posts, read 9,859,187 times
Reputation: 5959
I understand the logic, but a lot more goes into the equation than that. If medical employees is all it takes to support sit-down restaurants, why aren't there any around Grady?

Do you know many people who work in medical offices? How many of them routinely take hour long lunch breaks and go to sit-down restaurants? Why aren't sit-down restaurants thriving around Greenbriar? Plenty of medical offices there...

I think you're looking at things far too simply. Given Northlake's proximity to Emory, Northside, and St. Josephs, is there even a strong demand for medical office space in the area?

I'm not a believer that medical offices spur growth. They are also giant buildings that are useless and empty after 5 or 6pm, unless they are major hospitals. Good luck with it, but I'm not having a lot of faith in Northlake upon hearing this news.
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Old 11-03-2017, 11:56 AM
 
28,633 posts, read 25,417,911 times
Reputation: 9884
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
I understand the logic, but a lot more goes into the equation than that. If medical employees is all it takes to support sit-down restaurants, why aren't there any around Grady?

Do you know many people who work in medical offices? How many of them routinely take hour long lunch breaks and go to sit-down restaurants? Why aren't sit-down restaurants thriving around Greenbriar? Plenty of medical offices there...

I think you're looking at things far too simply. Given Northlake's proximity to Emory, Northside, and St. Josephs, is there even a strong demand for medical office space in the area?

I'm not a believer that medical offices spur growth. They are also giant buildings that are useless and empty after 5 or 6pm, unless they are major hospitals. Good luck with it, but I'm not having a lot of faith in Northlake upon hearing this news.
Development is more complex than that. Medical offices alone don't necessarily spur development, any more than mass transit alone does. Safety in of itself doesn't necessarily create development, nor do good schools or large parks.

But all of these elements can be important parts of the mix.

For example, many doctors like to live near their offices. That also applies to many of their employees. That has an impact on housing, as well as shopping, dining and other amenities.

And of course zillions of patients will be coming to medical offices. Many of them will want to dine somewhere nearby, or perhaps shop or do other things in the vicinity. I'll give an example of this from personal experience. We have an elderly friend who needs to go to Emory every couple of months for a check up and we normally take her. Almost every time, we'll all go over to a restaurant in the area that we normally wouldn't otherwise visit. Sometimes while we're waiting we'll do other errands in the area.

So there's a lot more involved than just restaurants for employees.

Medical offices tend to be pretty stable, too. They typically represent a substantial economic investment.

Last edited by arjay57; 11-03-2017 at 12:52 PM..
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