U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-15-2016, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
376 posts, read 196,806 times
Reputation: 297

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
Yes, we don't need these giant slices of asphalt slicing up prime space in our city. A lot of the retired highways in other cities have turned the space back into productive buildings or nice parks.
Can I ask something? I'm just trying to understand your point of view better. Do you regularly move around to different parts of the city during the week or are you someone who rarely leaves their neighborhood?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-15-2016, 12:39 PM
 
10,615 posts, read 7,538,458 times
Reputation: 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTravelinMan View Post
Can I ask something? I'm just trying to understand your point of view better. Do you regularly move around to different parts of the city during the week or are you someone who rarely leaves their neighborhood?
I end up all around (metro / country / world).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2016, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
376 posts, read 196,806 times
Reputation: 297
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
I end up all around (metro / country / world).
Ok, I was just curious.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2016, 01:46 PM
 
10,615 posts, read 7,538,458 times
Reputation: 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTravelinMan View Post
Ok, I was just curious.
Yep. Think visiting a lot of other cities has influenced my views. Had a lot of "this is great! why can't we do this in Atlanta?" moments.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2016, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 22,505,230 times
Reputation: 3886
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
Yep. Think visiting a lot of other cities has influenced my views. Had a lot of "this is great! why can't we do this in Atlanta?" moments.
I have those sorts of moments all the time because I lived my first 40+ years in the Twin Cities.

Let's just say Atlanta (and the State of Georgia) is different from what I was used to various ways.

That doesn't always mean things here are worse, and some things are certainly better, but a lot of things do seem to happen here that I honestly do not understand.

(The weather, by the way, is not better here in my opinion, but I'm one of those strange folks who actually likes getting ice in my beard. )
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2016, 03:02 PM
 
10,615 posts, read 7,538,458 times
Reputation: 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcsteiner View Post
I have those sorts of moments all the time because I lived my first 40+ years in the Twin Cities.

Let's just say Atlanta (and the State of Georgia) is different from what I was used to various ways.

That doesn't always mean things here are worse, and some things are certainly better, but a lot of things do seem to happen here that I honestly do not understand.

(The weather, by the way, is not better here in my opinion, but I'm one of those strange folks who actually likes getting ice in my beard. )
Yeah, to me the ways day to day life vary we eye-opening. Growing up in our suburbs, It just seemed so obvious that getting everywhere by car was a necessity and there is no reason to do it any differently. Traffic is just a way fact of life you have to accept.

Then traveling to other cities, initially expecting to get everywhere driving, and finding how nice day-to-day life was being able to walk the streets and hop on a train where you need to get. Having all these great buildings close together so you have everything you need right there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2016, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
376 posts, read 196,806 times
Reputation: 297
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
Then traveling to other cities, initially expecting to get everywhere driving, and finding how nice day-to-day life was being able to walk the streets and hop on a train where you need to get. Having all these great buildings close together so you have everything you need right there.
Yes I love to travel as well. What you mention is one reason I love to go visit a city like Portland where most everything is either a short walk or streetcar ride away.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2016, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 22,505,230 times
Reputation: 3886
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
Yeah, to me the ways day to day life vary we eye-opening. Growing up in our suburbs, It just seemed so obvious that getting everywhere by car was a necessity and there is no reason to do it any differently. Traffic is just a way fact of life you have to accept.

Then traveling to other cities, initially expecting to get everywhere driving, and finding how nice day-to-day life was being able to walk the streets and hop on a train where you need to get. Having all these great buildings close together so you have everything you need right there.
I haven't traveled that much, and I've only lived in suburbia, but I found both Montreal and London to be refreshing in terms of being walkable (for what I wanted). It was also nice to hop on the LIRR when I was taking a class on Long Island to finally check out parts of NYC and walk around a bit.

It depends on where you are, tho, within a given metro. Every city has areas which are well served by transit and areas which are not.

When I lived in the Twin Cities, I lived in two suburban locations which were not served well at all by transit, and one that was very well served by bus and (now) light rail and also fairly walkable. Based on the first two locations, I would have said the Twin Cities required a car. And it really does. But my third location had a lot of stuff really close. Location, location, location.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2016, 12:02 PM
bu2
 
10,092 posts, read 6,471,161 times
Reputation: 4208
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcsteiner View Post
I haven't traveled that much, and I've only lived in suburbia, but I found both Montreal and London to be refreshing in terms of being walkable (for what I wanted). It was also nice to hop on the LIRR when I was taking a class on Long Island to finally check out parts of NYC and walk around a bit.

It depends on where you are, tho, within a given metro. Every city has areas which are well served by transit and areas which are not.

When I lived in the Twin Cities, I lived in two suburban locations which were not served well at all by transit, and one that was very well served by bus and (now) light rail and also fairly walkable. Based on the first two locations, I would have said the Twin Cities required a car. And it really does. But my third location had a lot of stuff really close. Location, location, location.
Then there is also this humorous perspective. Its Houston vs. NY, but could be any number of cities vs. NY (or many other dense cities):


ďDuring my time there, I figured out a lotóabout Houston. My hometown, I realized, is easy. The mail comes on time. You donít have to wait for an hour, crammed in a small space with dozens of other people, just to get a prescription. You can use a full-size grocery cart at the grocery store. You donít have to ask an employee to use his hook to pull down a package of toilet paper for you. You donít have to lug your heavy groceries six blocks home. You donít reach the end of May and find yourself trudging through sludgy gray ice, incredulous that it can still be soÖdarnÖcold. You donít find yourself freezing, needing a restroom, waiting for a train that never comes, before giving up and spending money you donít have on a cab. Instead, you get to drive.


Thatís what I learned about Houston during my time in New York. What did I learn about New York? Itís a great place to visit. In the very late springtime.ď

Houston vs. NYC, Austin’s rail fail, Tokyo’s free market in land use, CA zoning impacts, and more - Opportunity Urbanist
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2016, 12:35 PM
 
5,129 posts, read 3,324,134 times
Reputation: 3408
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Then there is also this humorous perspective. Its Houston vs. NY, but could be any number of cities vs. NY (or many other dense cities):


[i]ďDuring my time there, I figured out a lotóabout Houston. My hometown, I realized, is easy. The mail comes on time. You donít have to wait for an hour, crammed in a small space with dozens of other people, just to get a prescription. You can use a full-size grocery cart at the grocery store. You donít have to ask an employee to use his hook to pull down a package of toilet paper for you. You donít have to lug your heavy groceries six blocks home. You donít reach the end of May and find yourself trudging through sludgy gray ice, incredulous that it can still be soÖdarnÖcold. You donít find yourself freezing, needing a restroom, waiting for a train that never comes, before giving up and spending money you donít have on a cab. Instead, you get to drive.


Thatís what I learned about Houston during my time in New York. What did I learn about New York? Itís a great place to visit. In the very late springtime.ď
True. It all depends on what you want. I live in Atlanta. The epicenter for my line of work is NYC. You know why I don't live in NYC? Because I can't stand it for more than a couple of days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:27 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top