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Old 03-04-2016, 03:30 PM
 
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(The Atlanta Journal Constitution's 'Political Insider' blog, Friday, March 4, 2016, 2:58 PM, Eastern Standard Time) CEO to Georgia lawmakers on religious liberty bill: ‘The world is watching’...

Quote:
Gov. Nathan Deal’s biblical case against Georgia’s “religious liberty” proposal provoked a show of support from business behemoths, gay rights activists and left-leaning groups uniting to rally around the Republican. The measure’s supporters, meanwhile, signaled they are digging in for a brutal battle over the last few weeks of the legislative session.

The governor said Thursday he would reject any measure that “allows discrimination in our state in order to protect people of faith,” and urged religious conservatives not to feel threatened by the ruling. He also called on his fellow Republicans pushing for the measure to take a deep breath and “recognize that the world is changing around us.”

Soon, a litany of corporate chieftains who had warned the measure was discriminatory praised the governor’s stance.
(The AJC's 'Political Insider blog') CEO to Georgia lawmakers on religious liberty bill: ‘The world is watching’
CEO to Georgia lawmakers on religious liberty bill: ‘The world is watching’ | Political Insider blog

(Atlanta Journal Constitution/MyAJC.com) Deal: reject ‘religious liberty’ bills that allow discrimination
Deal: reject religious liberty bills that allow discrimination | www.myajc.com
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Old 03-04-2016, 04:41 PM
 
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(Forbes Magazine) "Salesforce CEO Benioff: 'We Will Win In Georgia' Against 'Religious Liberty' Bill"

Quote:
Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff says his approach to social advocacy is simple: defend his employees and customers. And in leading the opposition to a “religious freedom” bill in Georgia that would allow businesses to deny service to same-sex couples, Benioff is confident he’s winning.

“It started in Indiana, where my employees drove us into the issue,” Benioff says. “We had no prior experience dealing with conflict in local legislatures trying to pass these ‘liberty’ bills. We got our experience there and won. And I’m confident we will win in Georgia.”

A year ago, Benioff contested a similar law in the Hoosier state, pulling his $8 billion (revenue) company out of hosting a money-generating conference there and offering to relocate employees. That time, Governor Mike Pence had already signed the bill into law. “We didn’t move fast enough,” Benioff says. But Benioff learned several tactics key for reversing Pence’s decision and prompting revisions to the bill.

Benioff took to Twitter, where he engaged his followers (more than 200,000 today) from the @Benioff handle...

...Benioff’s also developed a knack for rallying other CEOs and companies to his cause. In Georgia that’s meant directly emailing with Unilever CEO Paul Polman, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and billionaire Michael Dell. By making noise on the issue, others come on their own. Benioff points to Virgin, Porsche and Microsoft as companies whose leadership joined the effort on their own. More than 400 businesses are now participating in a group opposing the bill, Georgia Prospers. Says Benioff: “We have to kick it off, but once we get the ball rolling, other CEOs come in.”
Forbes Welcome
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Old 03-04-2016, 04:53 PM
 
1,809 posts, read 783,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnsleyPark View Post
Good analysis. Listening to the GOP debate last night, I think Ted Cruz may proffer up a piece of national legislation that does just what this bill was attempting to do.
I am fairly certain that the extreme right wing will not let this issue go easily and will more than likely continue to file suits in the courts (as they have been doing) in the hopes of a sympathetic ear from a conservative judge at either/or the state and federal level.

I see some sort of a test case going to the Supreme Court sooner or later, to finally determine just what are the limits of religious freedom, in terms of private enterprise. Hopefully, by then we have another liberal or moderate justice to help make the right call on this matter.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
True, but there's been a genuine shifting of attitudes towards the issue over the past 8 years or so--both personally and politically.
Sure, I agree it has been changing, but how much are his views and how much are him pushing the Repub agenda.

Anyway, while running for president wouldn't be likely, a position in the republican party in some other aspect wouldn't be shocking, particularly as they are going to need to find their way likely and he's at least shown some progressing in a Southern/right wing state.
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Old 03-06-2016, 01:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hokiehaven View Post
Sure, I agree it has been changing, but how much are his views and how much are him pushing the Repub agenda.

Anyway, while running for president wouldn't be likely, a position in the republican party in some other aspect wouldn't be shocking, particularly as they are going to need to find their way likely and he's at least shown some progressing in a Southern/right wing state.
By publicly outlining his opposition to this potentially catastrophic religious liberty bill, Governor Deal most certainly is not pushing the Republican agenda, which is to forcefully pushback against last summer's Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage in all 50 states at the behest of the increasingly anxious social and religious conservatives who continue to play a dominant role in Georgia electoral politics.

More than anything else that might have to do with his personal views on same-sex marriage or a push for a post-gubernatorial position in Republican politics, Governor Deal seems to be doing his job as the state's chief administrative executive to protect the state's growing international image and its economic well-being.

Deal also seems to be trying to protect the state's Republican supermajority from itself while also fighting to protect his legacy as the governor who lead the way in helping Georgia to become "Hollywood South" as the 3rd-largest film and TV production center in North America and the 5th-largest film and TV production center on the entire planet.

Deal knows that the passage of this bill into law would potentially be catastrophically devastating to the state's international image and its economic fortunes.

Deal also knows that the likely political fallout after the public relations and economic devastation would make the Georgia Republican Party vulnerable and put the GOP's continued dominance and competitiveness in state politics in extreme jeopardy.

Governor Deal and House Speaker David Ralston are the only two things currently standing in the way of a totally unnecessary self-inflicted public relations nightmare and economic Armageddon.

Deal and Ralston saw the massive national and international backlash and resulting economic and political fallout that happened in Indiana after that state's virtual ultra-majority Republican legislature passed into law an ill-advised RFRA (Religious Freedom Restoration Act) bill last spring. Needless to say, Deal and Ralston don't want that type of debacle to happen in Georgia, largely because they know that the fallout would most likely be worse than in Indiana.

(...Indiana's state legislature is ultra-majority Republican because the Republican Party controls 71 of the 100 (or a 71% supermajority) of the seats in the Indiana House of Representatives and 40 of the 50 (or an 80% ultra-majority) of the seats in the Indiana Senate.)

Deal and Ralston know that the public relations and economic fallout would be worse in Georgia than in Indiana because the opponents of this thing are extremely powerful and are already well-organized (and continue to organize and mobilize) at a stage that is much earlier in the legislative process than they were organized in Indiana last year. Deal and Ralston also know that the PR and economic fallout would be worse in Georgia than it was in Indiana last year because Georgia is a much larger state with a larger economy and much more to lose than Indiana.

The opposition to this thing, which is international in scope, would love nothing more than to make an even bigger example out of Georgia than they made out of Indiana last year.

Deal and Ralston also know that such a public relations and economic fallout in Georgia would most likely put the state's currently dominant Republican Party on a fast-track to political ruin with the state's rapidly-changing demographics and the extreme alienation and anger that the state's dominant business community would feel after such a needlessly self-inflicted crisis.

After such a debacle, the state's business community would likely turn away from financially backing Republican politicians like Casey Cagle and instead turn to financially backing Democratic politicians like Jason Carter and Kasim Reed. Without that financial backing, the Georgia Republican Party (which is already having some financial challenges) would possibly shrivel up and die within a decade.

Letting this catastrophically devastating bill pass into law would basically be handing the state of Georgia over to the Democrats on a silver platter at a time when the state's demographics are already trending and accelerating in favor of the Democrats. Letting this bill become law would basically be a pretty good attempt at political suicide for Georgia Republicans.

Deal, who ran for governor to escape a Congressional ethics investigation in Washington and who has turned around his failing finances while serving as governor, is more than likely headed towards retirement after his second and final term as governor ends in 2019 (when he will be 76 years old) and does not appear to be seeking a post-gubernatorial high-profile role in an increasingly volatile Republican Party that potentially may not even exist as we currently know it by that time. Deal instead just seems to be doing his job as governor by attempting to protect this state's image and economy from irreparable harm.
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Old 03-06-2016, 07:18 AM
 
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Good analysis as always, B2R.
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Old 03-06-2016, 08:09 PM
 
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B2R interesting post. He's like Nixon. A crook that does some good things here and there.
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Old 03-08-2016, 01:56 PM
Status: "reppin ALL of Georgia" (set 10 days ago)
 
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A possible comprise has been proposed by Rep. Peake of Macon and Rep. Baskin of Atlanta.

Quote:
State Rep. Allen Peake, a Macon Republican, said he and state Rep. Beth Beskin, R-Atlanta, have devised a possible solution.

Their plan, revealed in an email to Deal’s aides and House Speaker David Ralston obtained Tuesday through a public records request, would strip the Senate proposal of language that would enable faith-based organizations and individuals to opt out of serving couples while keeping the part that states clergy could not be forced to perform a same-sex wedding ceremony.

He would also add a line declaring that no business “shall be required to sell goods or services directly to a religious organization or for a religious or matrimonial ceremony.”

“Guys, as you know I have a gay brother and have serious concerns about the language added in the Senate onto HB 757,” Peake wrote, referring to the legislation. “I sure don’t want us to pass any legislation that would cause him to be denied service or turned away from a restaurant or hotel, just because he is gay.”

He added: “But I also fully understand and support that he should not expect someone to ‘participate’ in his gay wedding, if that participation violated an individual’s religious conviction.”
Some Georgia Republicans eye a middle ground on ‘religious liberty’ debate | Political Insider blog
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Old 03-08-2016, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Vinings
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It's not a religious conviction, though. It's a homophobic conviction, with religion as an excuse. And a shaky one since there's never really been a clear or direct connection between the teachings of Jesus, and bigotry and opposition to homosexuality.

Funny, it's almost as if religion itself were just a big made up excuse to be an a-hole towards other kinds of people and groups, and to assert power and social and legal dominance over them, wherever and whenever it becomes convenient.
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Old 03-08-2016, 03:17 PM
 
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In the south, particular, religion has always been an excuse. Religion was used to justify slavery.
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