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Old 05-09-2016, 12:07 PM
 
9,915 posts, read 6,901,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pemgin View Post
Like it or not, one day people are going to have to confront the reality of the massive amount of resources needed to maintain suburbia. It's pretty clear that what we have now is not sustainable forever.
Agreed. I wonder what the average lane-miles of road / sewer / water lines per taxpayer is in many of these sprawling areas.
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Old 05-09-2016, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,911 posts, read 9,594,157 times
Reputation: 5313
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Nearly everything in the article was a condemnation of zoning, although the author didn't seem to understand it. The most regulated cities, the ones who most want urbanization, are the ones who have the biggest problems with these issues. You could go Houston's route and not have zoning. Atlanta has 40 or 50 different zoning categories. Its ridiculous. DeKalb County dropped about a half dozen of theirs, but they still have a couple dozen categories.

If people want it, developers will build it if government doesn't try to tell them what to build with zoning. Now the results are not going to be NYC type urbanization everywhere. Not everyone wants that.

BTW, alleys are awful. They were popular in the Dallas area into the 70s.
Popular in the 70s? How about 2016?
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Old 05-09-2016, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,911 posts, read 9,594,157 times
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Add NYC, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia..... even London and Paris to the mix. Sprawling suburban areas in all of these cities. It is not an Atlanta phenomenon.

What do those cities have that Atlanta doesn't? Commuter rail. Atlanta has the rail network into the city to do it.
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Old 05-09-2016, 07:02 PM
bu2
 
8,975 posts, read 5,670,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
Popular in the 70s? How about 2016?
I haven't driven around McKinney and Allen and Frisco where the new houses are being built short of 380, 121 and US 75. Our friends in McKinney don't have an alley. Now I know the houses built in the 70s tended to have alleys, but I don't remember all the stuff built in Plano in the 80s/90s having alleys.
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Old 05-09-2016, 07:41 PM
 
5,374 posts, read 4,893,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
BTW, alleys are awful. They were popular in the Dallas area into the 70s.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
Popular in the 70s? How about 2016?
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
I haven't driven around McKinney and Allen and Frisco where the new houses are being built short of 380, 121 and US 75. Our friends in McKinney don't have an alley. Now I know the houses built in the 70s tended to have alleys, but I don't remember all the stuff built in Plano in the 80s/90s having alleys.
My cousin lived in a golf community about a half-mile south of 121 in Plano where the driveway had to be accessed from an alley behind the house. The house was built in 1998.

I don't necessarily mind alleys, especially if it keeps builders from designing houses where the garage looks like the most prominent feature on the front of the house ("a garage with a house attached to it" instead of a house with a garage attached to it).
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Old 05-09-2016, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,911 posts, read 9,594,157 times
Reputation: 5313
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
I haven't driven around McKinney and Allen and Frisco where the new houses are being built short of 380, 121 and US 75. Our friends in McKinney don't have an alley. Now I know the houses built in the 70s tended to have alleys, but I don't remember all the stuff built in Plano in the 80s/90s having alleys.
It's about 50/50 in McKinney. The big Stonebridge Ranch development tended to stay away from alleys, but a lot of the other builders out here are still doing it. Personally don't care for them myself. People tend to park on the curbs even more. And there is something Stepfordish about the way the neighborhood looks with no driveways. Plus it eats into the backyard, or what little of one you get out here.
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Old 05-09-2016, 08:41 PM
 
980 posts, read 550,807 times
Reputation: 694
What do people do in suburbia, especially if you don't have kids?
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Old 05-09-2016, 08:42 PM
 
Location: morningside, atlanta
361 posts, read 454,102 times
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Atlanta suburbs are the worst kind of suburbs. There's no connectivity, no sidewalks, you HAVE to drive. At least in semi-dense suburban areas you have sidewalks and can walk to the nearest shopping center. It's a terrible experience for teenagers who can't or don't drive.
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Old 05-09-2016, 08:50 PM
 
980 posts, read 550,807 times
Reputation: 694
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabasse View Post
Atlanta suburbs are the worst kind of suburbs. There's no connectivity, no sidewalks, you HAVE to drive. At least in semi-dense suburban areas you have sidewalks and can walk to the nearest shopping center. It's a terrible experience for teenagers who can't or don't drive.
Well yes, but part of the problem is that we consider certain places as suburbs when really they should be exurbs. I mean... Think about Decatur and Brookhaven. I'd consider these places suburbs of Atlanta and they both offer decent connectivity and walkibility (in certain parts). But once you start getting 20, 30 miles away from the city, then really you should be considered an exurb in my opinion.
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Old 05-09-2016, 08:54 PM
 
4,013 posts, read 2,292,047 times
Reputation: 1967
I would move to the suburbs if they had heavy rail. Im not doing that commute daily into downtown. Add heavy rail and I would move ASAP
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